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Rebecca Dresser [140]Rebecca S. Dresser [7]R. Dresser [6]
  1. Dworkin on Dementia: Elegant Theory, Questionable Policy.Rebecca Dresser - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (6):32-38.
    When patients have progressive and incurable dementia, should their advance directives always be followed? Contra Dworkin, Dresser argues that when patients remain able to enjoy and participate in their lives, directives to hasten death should sometimes be disregarded.
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  2. Advance euthanasia directives: a controversial case and its ethical implications.David Gibbes Miller, Rebecca Dresser & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):84-89.
    Authorising euthanasia and assisted suicide with advance euthanasia directives is permitted, yet debated, in the Netherlands. We focus on a recent controversial case in which a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease was euthanised based on her AED. A Dutch euthanasia review committee found that the physician performing the euthanasia failed to follow due care requirements for euthanasia and assisted suicide. This case is notable because it is the first case to trigger a criminal investigation since the 2002 Dutch euthanasia law (...)
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  3.  19
    Wanted.Rebecca Dresser - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (1):24-29.
  4.  61
    Quality of Life and Non-Treatment Decisions for Incompetent Patients: A Critique of the Orthodox Approach.Rebecca S. Dresser & John A. Robertson - 1989 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 17 (3):234-244.
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  5.  36
    Wanted Single, White Male for Medical Research.Rebecca Dresser - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (1):24.
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  6. Quality of Life and Non-Treatment Decisions for Incompetent Patients: A Critique of the Orthodox Approach.Rebecca S. Dresser & John A. Robertson - 1989 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 17 (3):234-244.
  7.  13
    The Reasonable Person Standard for Research Disclosure: A Reasonable Addition to the Common Rule.Rebecca Dresser - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):194-202.
    The revised Common Rule adopts the reasonable person standard to guide research disclosure. Some members of the research community contend that the standard is confusing and ill-suited to the research oversight system. Yet the revised rule is not as radical as it might seem. During the 1970s, judges started using the standard to evaluate negligence claims brought by injured patients who said doctors had failed to obtain informed consent to the harmful procedures. In its influential Belmont Report, the National Commission (...)
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  8.  11
    Experimentation without Representation.Rebecca Dresser - 2018 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 40 (2):3-7.
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  9.  19
    The Limited Value of Dementia‐Specific Advance Directives.Rebecca Dresser - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (2):4-5.
    Many people are worried about developing dementia, fearing the losses and burdens that accompany the condition. Dementia‐specific advance directives are intended to address dementia's progressive effects, allowing individuals to express their treatment preferences for different stages of the condition. But enthusiasm for dementia‐specific advance directives should be tempered by recognition of the legal, ethical, and practical issues they raise. Dementia‐specific advance directives are a simplistic response to a complicated situation. Although they enable people to register their future care preferences, in (...)
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  10.  22
    First-in-Human Trial Participants: Not a Vulnerable Population, but Vulnerable Nonetheless.Rebecca Dresser - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):38-50.
    Translational science is a 21st century mission. Government officials and industry leaders are making huge investments in an attempt to transform more basic science discoveries into therapeutic applications. Scientists and policymakers express great excitement about the medical advances that could come with the current bench-to-bedside campaign.A key step in translational science is the move from animal and other preclinical studies to initial human testing. Researchers ability to predict human effects is limited, and first-in-human tests present significant uncertainty. Participants in this (...)
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  11.  27
    First-in-Human Trial Participants: Not a Vulnerable Population, but Vulnerable Nonetheless.Rebecca Dresser - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):38-50.
    The 21st-century translational science campaign could lead to an increase in first-in-human trials. As tests of investigational interventions move from the laboratory to human research, scientists, officials, and review committees should address ongoing concerns about the ethics of FIH trials. In this article, I describe three ethical considerations relevant to all FIH trials: the requirement for adequate preclinical research; study design safeguards; and choice of subject population. I also examine specific ethical considerations relevant to the three subject populations involved in (...)
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  12.  41
    The ubiquity and utility of the therapeutic misconception.Rebecca Dresser - 2002 - Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):271-294.
    The term “therapeutic misconception” was coined in 1982 by Paul Appelbaum, Loren Roth, and Charles Lidz. Appelbaum and his colleagues interviewed participants in several psychiatric studies, including a drug trial with a placebo control arm. Appelbaum's group found that many people were unaware of the differences between participating in a study and receiving treatment in the clinical setting. Rather than understanding these differences, study participants tended to believe that therapy and research were governed by the same primary goal: to advance (...)
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  13.  14
    A Tangled Web: Deception in Everyday Dementia Care.Rebecca Dresser - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (2):257-262.
    Care workers and families often engage in deception in everyday interactions with people affected by dementia. While benevolent deception can be justified, there are often more respectful and less risky ways to help people with dementia seeking to make sense of their lives.
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  14.  12
    Ourselves, with Dementia.Rebecca Dresser - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (4):3-3.
    Fear of dementia leads some people to demand an opportunity to choose death over life with the illness. They want the power to make advance euthanasia directives and to refuse hand feeding at some point in the dementia process. But the choices we make in advance aren't always suited to the people we become. Experts and family members say people with dementia often adapt, becoming content with their lives. People should care about their future selves with dementia. Their advance instructions (...)
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  15.  25
    Off-Label Prescribing: A Call for Heightened Professional and Government Oversight.Rebecca Dresser & Joel Frader - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):476-486.
    Under current U.S. law, physicians may prescribe drugs and devices in situations not covered on the label approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Those supporting this system say that requiring FDA approval for off-label uses would unnecessarily impede the delivery of benefits to patients. Patients do benefit from off-label prescribing that is supported by sound scientific and medical evidence. In the absence of such evidence, however, off-label prescribing can expose patients to risky and ineffective treatments. The medical community and (...)
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  16.  12
    Off-Label Prescribing: A Call for Heightened Professional and Government Oversight.Rebecca Dresser & Joel Frader - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):476-486.
    Off-label prescribing is an integral part of contemporary medicine. Many patients benefit when they receive drugs or devices under circumstances not specified on the label approved by the Food and Drug Administration. An off-label use may provide the best available intervention for a patient, as well as the standard of care for a particular health problem. In oncology, pediatrics, geriatrics, obstetrics, and other practice areas, patient care could not proceed without off-label prescribing. When scientific and medical evidence justify off-label uses, (...)
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  17.  16
    Silent partners: human subjects and research ethics.Rebecca Dresser - 2017 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    Subject perspectives : the missing element in research ethics -- Personal knowledge and study participation -- The everyday ethics of human research -- The hidden world of subjects : rule-breaking in clinical trials -- Participants as partners in genetic research -- Terminally ill patients and the right to try experimental drugs -- Embedded ethics in developing country research -- Research subjects as literary subjects -- How to hear subjects.
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  18.  13
    Medical choices and changing selves.Rebecca Dresser - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (6):403-403.
    In The Harm Principle, Personal Identity and Identity-Relative Paternalism,1 Wilkinson offers a thoughtful argument about medical decision-making and Derek Parfit’s reductionist account of personal identity. I agree that Parfit’s account can contribute to the ethical analysis of patients’ choices. My own work in this area emphasises challenges the reductionist account presents to conventional understanding of advance treatment directives, particularly in cases involving people with dementia.2 I have also urged people making directives to consider the harm their directives could impose on (...)
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  19.  35
    Subversive Subjects: Rule‐Breaking and Deception in Clinical Trials.Rebecca Dresser - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):829-840.
    Research subjects do not always conform to research requirements. When their personal interests conflict with the demands of participation, some subjects surreptitiously break the rules. These subjects are subversive — they undermine the research endeavor. In rejecting the restrictions research imposes, subversive subjects diminish the value of research results. From one vantage point, subversive subjects engage in unethical behavior. They create risks to themselves and others; they also disregard ethical responsibilities to adhere to research agreements and tell the truth. At (...)
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  20.  11
    Subversive Subjects: Rule-Breaking and Deception in Clinical Trials.Rebecca Dresser - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):829-840.
    Scientific reports about clinical research appear objective and straightforward. They describe a study's findings, methods, subject population, number of subjects, and contribution to existing knowledge. The overall picture is pristine: the research team establishes the requirements of study participation and subjects conform to these requirements. Readers are left with the impression that everything was done correctly, by the book.In other places, however, one finds a different and messier picture of clinical research. In this picture, research subjects deviate from the prescribed (...)
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  21.  14
    Law, Ethics, and the Patient Preference Predictor.R. Dresser - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (2):178-186.
    The Patient Preference Predictor (PPP) is intended to improve treatment decision making for incapacitated patients. The PPP would collect information about the treatment preferences of people with different demographic and other characteristics. It could be used to indicate which treatment option an individual patient would be most likely to prefer, based on data about the preferences of people who resemble the patient. The PPP could be incorporated into existing US law governing treatment for incapacitated patients, although it is unclear whether (...)
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  22.  91
    Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field.Leili Fatehi, Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey McCullough, Ralph Hall, Frances Lawrenz, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Cortney Jones, Stephen A. Campbell, Rebecca S. Dresser, Arthur G. Erdman, Christy L. Haynes, Robert A. Hoerr, Linda F. Hogle, Moira A. Keane, George Khushf, Nancy M. P. King, Efrosini Kokkoli, Gary Marchant, Andrew D. Maynard, Martin Philbert, Gurumurthy Ramachandran, Ronald A. Siegel & Samuel Wickline - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):716-750.
    Nanomedicine is yielding new and improved treatments and diagnostics for a range of diseases and disorders. Nanomedicine applications incorporate materials and components with nanoscale dimensions where novel physiochemical properties emerge as a result of size-dependent phenomena and high surface-to-mass ratio. Nanotherapeutics and in vivo nanodiagnostics are a subset of nanomedicine products that enter the human body. These include drugs, biological products, implantable medical devices, and combination products that are designed to function in the body in ways unachievable at larger scales. (...)
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  23.  47
    Review essay / making up our minds: Can law survive cognitive science?Rebecca Dresser - 1991 - Criminal Justice Ethics 10 (1):27-40.
    Lynne Rudder Baker, Saving Belief: A Critique of Physicalism Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987, xii + 177 pp. Daniel C. Dennett, The Intentional Stance Cambridge: MIT Press, 1987, xi + 388 pp. Paul M. Churchland, Matter and Consciousness Cambridge: MIT Press, revised edition, 1988, xii + 184 pp.
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  24.  50
    Advance Directives and Discrimination against People with Dementia.Rebecca Dresser - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):26-27.
    In the article “On Avoiding Deep Dementia,” Norman Cantor defends a position that I suspect many readers share. In my years writing and speaking on advance directives and dementia, I've found that most people support one of two positions. They are convinced either that advance choices should control the treatment dementia patients receive or that the welfare of a person with dementia should sometimes take priority over earlier choices. As Cantor points out, I support the second position.I agree with several (...)
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  25.  32
    Building an Ethical Foundation for First-in-Human Nanotrials.Rebecca Dresser - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):802-808.
    Novel nanomedical interventions require human testing to evaluate their safety and effectiveness. To establish a proper evidentiary basis for human trials, nanomedical innovations must first be subjected to animal and other laboratory testing. But it is uncertain whether the traditional laboratory approaches to safety evaluation will supply adequate information on nanotechnology risks to humans. This uncertainty, together with other features of nanomedical innovation, heightens the ethical challenges in conducting FIH nanotrials.
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  26.  19
    Building an Ethical Foundation for First-in-Human Nanotrials.Rebecca Dresser - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):802-808.
    The biomedical literature and popular media are full of upbeat reports about the health benefits we can expect from medical innovations using nanotechnology. Some particularly enthusiastic reports portray nanotechnology as one of the innovations that will lead to a significantly extended human life span. Extreme enthusiasts predict that nanotechnology “will ultimately enable us to redesign and rebuild, molecule by molecule, our bodies and brains….”Nanomaterials have special characteristics that could contribute to improved patient care. But the same characteristics that make nanotechnology (...)
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  27.  22
    “Right to Try” Laws: The Gap between Experts and Advocates.Rebecca Dresser - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (3):9-10.
    The year 2014 brought a new development in the bioethics “laboratory of the states.” Five states adopted “right to try” laws intended to promote terminally ill patients' access to investigational drugs. Many more state legislatures are now considering such laws. The campaign for right to try laws is the latest move in an ongoing effort to give seriously ill patients access to drugs whose safety and effectiveness remain largely unknown. Although scientists and policy‐makers oppose the right to try approach, it (...)
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  28.  27
    Stem Cell Research as Innovation: Expanding the Ethical and Policy Conversation.Rebecca Dresser - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):332-341.
    In 1998, researchers established the first human embryonic stem cell line. Their scientific triumph triggered an ethics and policy argument that persists today. Bioethicists, religious leaders, government officials, patient advocates, and scientists continue to debate whether this research poses a promise, a threat, or a mixed ethical picture for society.Scientists are understandably excited about the knowledge that could come from studying human embryonic stem cells. Most of them believe these cells offer a precious opportunity to learn more about why diseases (...)
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  29. Stem Cell Research as Innovation: Expanding the Ethical and Policy Conversation.Rebecca Dresser - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):332-341.
    Research using human embryonic stem cells raises an array of complex ethical issues, including, but by no means limited to, the moral status of developing human life. Unfortunately much of the public discussion fails to take into account this complexity. Advocacy for liberal and conservative positions on human embryonic stem cell research can be simplistic and misleading. Ethical concepts such as truth-telling, scientific integrity, and social justice should be part of the debate over federal support for human embryonic stem cell (...)
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  30.  33
    Bound to Treatment: The Ulysses Contract.Rebecca Dresser - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (3):13-16.
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  31.  23
    The Human Use of Animals: Case Studies in Ethical Choice.F. Barbara Orlans, Tom L. Beauchamp, Rebecca Dresser, David B. Morton & John P. Gluck - 1998 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The first set of case studies on animal use, this volume offers a thorough, up-to-date exploration of the moral issues related to animal welfare. Its main purpose is to examine how far it is ethically justifiable to harm animals in order to benefit mankind. An excellent introduction provides a framework for the cases and sets the background of philosophical and moral concepts underlying the subject. Sixteen original, previously unpublished essays cover controversies associated with the human use of animals in a (...)
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  32. Advance directives, self-determination, and personal identity.Rebecca Dresser - 1989 - In Chris Hackler, Ray Moseley & Dorothy E. Vawter (eds.), Advance Directives in Medicine. Praeger. pp. 155--70.
     
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  33.  13
    Enlisting the Experts: Experienced Research Participants in Study Planning.Rebecca Dresser - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):20-22.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 20-22.
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  34.  14
    The UN Challenge to Guardianship and Surrogate Decision‐Making.Rebecca Dresser - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (2):4-6.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 2, Page 4-6, March‐April 2022.
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  35.  87
    Bioethics and Cancer: When the Professional Becomes Personal.Rebecca Dresser - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (6):14-18.
    In 2006, I was diagnosed with cancer. This began a crash course in real-world medical ethics. Having cancer was awful, but it was instructive, too. The experience gave me a new understanding of what my profession is about. Individuals in the bioethics field often address topics related to cancer, such as medical decision-making, the patient-physician relationship, clinical trials, and access to health care. Yet few engaged in this work have lived with cancer themselves. Experience as a cancer patient or family (...)
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  36.  24
    ""Confronting the" near irrelevance" of advance directives.Rebecca Dresser - 1994 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (1):55-56.
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  37.  26
    Treatment decisions and changing selves.Rebecca Dresser - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (12):975-976.
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  38.  83
    Professionals, conformity, and conscience.Rebecca Dresser - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (6):9-10.
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  39.  18
    Toward a Humane Death with Dementia.Rebecca Dresser - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (3):38-40.
    In this issue, Paul Menzel and M. Colette Chandler‐Cramer propose a novel advance directive. Besides giving competent people the opportunity to refuse future life‐prolonging medical interventions, they say, advance directives should give people the opportunity to refuse ordinary food and water if they later experience severe dementia.This proposal is both appealing and unsettling. It is appealing because it offers some relief to people seeking to avoid the prolonged decline and extreme incapacity they have witnessed in relatives and friends with advanced (...)
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  40.  45
    Response to: ‘Dementia and advance directives: some empirical and normative concerns’ by Jongsma et al.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Gibbes Miller & Rebecca Dresser - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):95-96.
    We are grateful to Jongsma et al 1 for their interest in our article analysing the case of ‘Mrs A’, a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease who received euthanasia based on her advance euthanasia directive.2 Their commentary criticises two elements of our analysis. First, the authors believe our reasons for doubting that Mrs A had the capacity to write and revise an AED rely on ‘partial’ empirical data and rest on normative errors. Second, they use two of our statements to (...)
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  41.  21
    Payments to research participants: The importance of context.Rebecca Dresser - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):47.
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  42.  41
    Standards for Family Decisions: Replacing Best Interests with Harm Prevention.Rebecca Dresser - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):54-55.
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  43. Dworkin on Dementia.Rebecca Dresser - 2006 - In Stephen A. Green & Sidney Bloch (eds.), An anthology of psychiatric ethics. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 297--301.
     
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  44.  8
    When science offers salvation: patient advocacy and research ethics.Rebecca Dresser - 2001 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    "Patient advocates can help make research more ethical, but advocacy raises ethical issues of its own.
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  45.  27
    Cosmetic reproductive services and professional integrity.Rebecca Dresser - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):11 – 12.
  46.  32
    Pre-emptive suicide, precedent autonomy and preclinical Alzheimer disease.Rebecca Dresser - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):550-551.
    It's not unusual to hear someone say, ‘I'd rather be dead than have Alzheimer's’. In ‘Alzheimer Disease and Preemptive Suicide’,1 Dena Davis explains why this is a reasonable position. People taking this position will welcome the discovery of biomarkers permitting very early AD diagnosis, Davis suggests, for this will enable more of them to end their lives while they remain motivated and able to do so. At the same time, Davis observes, people would have less reason to resort to the (...)
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  47.  63
    Standards for animal research: Looking at the middle.Rebecca Dresser - 1988 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (2):123-143.
    Much of the public debate over laboratory animal use has focused on either the scientist's demand for absolute freedom of inquiry, or the abolitionist's demand for an end to animal use in science. Yet many recent proposals for reform seek instead to balance the interests of laboratory animals in avoiding harm against the interests of research beneficiaries in continued animal use. This essay is an analysis of the intermediate reform positions and their underlying ethical principles. Keywords: animal research, animal experimentation, (...)
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  48.  42
    The curious case of off-label use.Rebecca Dresser - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (3):9-11.
  49.  35
    On Legalizing Physician‐Assisted Death for Dementia.Rebecca Dresser - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (4):5-6.
    Last November, soon after Colorado became the latest state to authorize physician-assisted suicide, National Public Radio's The Diane Rehm Show devoted a segment to legalization of “physician assistance in dying,” a label that refers to both physician-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia. Although the segment initially focused on PAD in the context of terminal illness in general, it wasn't long before PAD's potential application to dementia patients came up. A caller said that her mother had Alzheimer's disease and was being (...)
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  50.  29
    Suicide Attempts and Treatment Refusals.Rebecca Dresser - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (3):10-11.
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