Results for 'R. G. Kuehni'

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  1.  25
    Color Matching and Color Naming: A Response to Roberts and Schmidtke.R. G. Kuehni & C. L. Hardin - 2015 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (2):199-205.
    In their article ‘In defense of incompatibility, objectivism, and veridicality about color’ P. Roberts and K. Schmidtke offer the results of an experiment supposed to show that if selection of colored samples representing unique hues for subjects has a greater inter-subject variability than identification of sample pairs with no perceptual difference between them the result provides support for the philosophical concept of color realism. On examining the results in detail, we find that, according to standard statistical methodology, the relative magnitude (...)
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  2.  83
    The Objectivity of Morality: R. G. Swinburne.R. G. Swinburne - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (195):5-20.
    If I say “we are now living in England” or “grass is green in summer’ or ‘the cat is on the mat’ what I say will normally be true or false—the statements are true if they correctly report how things are, or correspond to the facts; and if they do not do these things, they are false. Such a statement will only fail to have a truth-value if its referring expressions fail to refer ; or if the statement lies on (...)
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  3.  26
    The Christian Wager: R. G. SWINBURNE.R. G. Swinburne - 1969 - Religious Studies 4 (2):217-228.
    On what grounds will the rational man become a Christian? It is often assumed by many, especially non-Christians, that he will become a Christian if and only if he judges that the evidence available to him shows that it is more likely than not that the Christian theological system is true, that, in mathematical terms, on the evidence available to him, the probability of its truth is greater than half. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate whether or (...)
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  4. The Argument From Design—a Defence: R. G. SWINBURNE.R. G. Swinburne - 1972 - Religious Studies 8 (3):193-205.
    Mr Olding's recent attack on my exposition of the argument from design gives me an opportunity to defend the central theses of my original article. My article pointed out that there were arguments from design of two types—those which take as their premisses regularities of copresence and those which take as their premisses regularities of succession. I sought to defend an argument of the second type. One merit of such an argument is that there is no doubt about the truth (...)
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  5.  22
    Faith and the Existence of God: R. G. Swinburne.R. G. Swinburne - 1988 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 24:121-143.
    Arguments move from premises to conclusions. The premises state things taken temporally for granted; if the argument works, the premises provide grounds for affirming the conclusion. A valid deductive argument is one in which the premises necessitate, that is, entail, the conclusion. What I shall call a ‘correct’ inductive argument is one in which the premises in some degree probabilify the conclusion, but do not necessitate it. More precisely, in what I shall call a correct P -inductive argument the premises (...)
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  6.  49
    Privacy, Control, and Talk of Rights: R. G. FREY.R. G. Frey - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):45-67.
    An alleged moral right to informational privacy assumes that we should have control over information about ourselves. What is the philosophical justification for this control? I think that one prevalent answer to this question—an answer that has to do with the justification of negative rights generally—will not do.
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  7.  8
    Physical Determinism: R. G. Swinburne.R. G. Swinburne - 1969 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 3:155-168.
    The object of this paper is to examine what evidence we can have for or against the truth of determinism, a doctrine often set forward by the proposition ‘every event has a cause’. I understand in this context by the cause of an event a set of prior conditions jointly sufficient for the occurrence of the event. Since the determinist is concerned with all physical states and not merely with changes of states, which are most naturally termed events, we may (...)
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  8. .R. G. Swinburne - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
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  9.  17
    Suicide and Self-Inflicted Death: R. G. Frey.R. G. Frey - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (216):193-202.
    The most common view of suicide today is that it is intentional self-killing. 1 Because of the self-killing component, suicide is often described as self-inflicted death or as dying by one's own hand, and the victim is in turn often described as having done himself to death or as having taken his own life. But must one's death be self-inflicted in order to be suicide? The answer, I want to suggest, is arguably no.
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  10.  40
    Mind, History, and Dialectic. The Philosophy of R. G. Collingwood.Alan Donagan, R. G. Collingwood & Louis O. Mink - 1970 - History and Theory 9 (3):363.
  11.  11
    Morals, Reasons, and Animals.R. G. Frey - 1989 - Ethics 100 (1):191-192.
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  12. Personal Identity.R. G. Swinburne - 1974 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74:231 - 247.
    EMPIRICIST THEORIES OF PERSONAL IDENTITY STATE THAT THE IDENTITY OF A PERSON OVER TIME IS A MATTER OF BODILY CONTINUITY AND/OR SIMILARITY OF MEMORY AND CHARACTER. IN CONTRAST, THIS PAPER ARGUES THAT WHILE BODILY CONTINUITY AND SIMILARITY OF MEMORY AND CHARACTER ARE EVIDENCE OF PERSONAL IDENTITY, THEY DO NOT CONSTITUTE IT. IT IS SOMETHING UNDEFINABLE. THE DIFFICULTY OF KNOWING WHAT TO SAY IN PUZZLE CASES DOES NOT SHOW THAT PERSONAL IDENTITY EXISTS IN DIFFERENT DEGREES OR THAT WE HAVE TO MAKE (...)
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  13.  66
    Falsifiability of Scientific Theories.R. G. Swinburne - 1964 - Mind 73 (291):434-436.
  14.  10
    R. G. Collingwood on the Identity of Thoughts.Heikki Saari - 1989 - Dialogue 28 (1):77-89.
    R. G. Collingwood's re-enactment doctrine has been widely discussed in recent years by his commentators. However, most philosophers who discuss the re-enactment doctrine touch only briefly on his view of the identity of thoughts. This is surprising because Collingwood claims that the historian's successful re-enactment of the thought behind the historical agent's action involves re-thinking the same thought as the agent and not merely a copy of his thought.
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  15. The Principles of Art.R. G. Collingwood - 1938 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This treatise on aesthetics criticizes various psychological theories of art, offers new theories and interpretations, and draws important inferences concerning ...
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  16.  50
    Completely Mitotic R.E. Degrees.R. G. Downey & T. A. Slaman - 1989 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 41 (2):119-152.
  17. Interests and Rights: The Case Against Animals.R. G. Frey - 1980 - Oxford University Press.
  18. The Argument From Design.R. G. Swinburne - 1968 - Philosophy 43 (165):199 - 212.
    ARGUMENTS FROM DESIGN TO THE EXISTENCE OF GOD MAY TAKE AS THEIR PREMISS EITHER THE EXISTENCE OF REGULARITIES OF COPRESENCE OR THE EXISTENCE OF REGULARITIES OF SUCCESSION. THERE ARE NO VALID FORMAL OBJECTIONS TO A CAREFULLY ARTICULATED ARGUMENT OF THE LATTER TYPE. AGAINST SUCH AN ARGUMENT NONE OF THE OBJECTIONS IN HUME’S "DIALOGUES" HAVE ANY WORTH. THE ARGUMENT MAY HOWEVER GIVE ONLY A SMALL DEGREE OF SUPPORT TO ITS CONCLUSION.
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  19. Miracles.R. G. Swinburne - 1968 - Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):320-328.
    (I UNDERSTAND BY A MIRACLE, A VIOLATION OF A LAW OF NATURE BY A GOD.) A VIOLATION OF A LAW OF NATURE IS THE OCCURRENCE OF A NON-REPEATABLE COUNTER-INSTANCE TO IT. CONTRARY TO HUME’S VIEW, THERE COULD BE GOOD HISTORICAL EVIDENCE BOTH THAT A VIOLATION HAD OCCURRED AND THAT IT WAS DUE TO THE ACT OF A GOD.
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  20. An Essay on Metaphysics.R. G. Collingwood - 1940 - Oxford University Press.
    One of the great Oxford philosopher's finest works, Essay on Metaphysics considers the nature of philosophy, and puts forward Collingwood's original and influential theories of causation, presuppositions, and the logic of question and answer. This new edition includes three fascinating unpublished pieces that illuminate and amplify the Essay.
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  21.  13
    An Autobiography.R. G. Collingwood - 1939 - New York: Etc.]Oxford University Press.
  22.  23
    Retractions in the Medical Literature: How Many Patients Are Put at Risk by Flawed Research?R. G. Steen - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):688-692.
    Background Clinical papers so flawed that they are eventually retracted may put patients at risk. Patient risk could arise in a retracted primary study or in any secondary study that draws ideas or inspiration from a primary study. Methods To determine how many patients were put at risk, we evaluated 788 retracted English-language papers published from 2000 to 2010, describing new research with humans or freshly derived human material. These primary papers—together with all secondary studies citing them—were evaluated using ISI (...)
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  23.  17
    The Philosophy of Karl Popper.R. G. Swinburne & P. A. Schilpp - 1975 - Philosophical Quarterly 25 (101):365.
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  24.  61
    Goals, Luck, and Moral Obligation: R. G. Frey.R. G. Frey - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):297-316.
    In Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy, Bernard Williams is rather severe on what he thinks of as an ethics of obligation. He has in mind by this Kant and W. D. Ross. For many, obligation seems the very core of ethics and the moral realm, and lives more generally are seen through the prism of this notion. This, according to Williams, flattens out our lives and moral experience and fails to take into account things which are obviously important to (...)
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  25. Analyticity, Necessity and Apriority.R. G. Swinburne - 1975 - Mind 84 (334):225-243.
    THE PAPER BEGINS BY CONSIDERING THREE ALTERNATIVE DEFINITIONS OF "ANALYTIC," ONE IN TERMS OF LOGICAL TRUTH, ONE IN TERMS OF THE MEANINGS OF WORDS, AND ONE IN TERMS OF SELF-CONTRADICTION OR INCOHERENCE. NEXT, FIVE DEFINITIONS OF "NECESSARY" ARE CONSIDERED, ONE IN TERMS OF ANALYTICITY, AND ONE PICKING OUT THE BROADER KIND OF LOGICAL NECESSITY DISCUSSED BY KRIPKE AND PLANTINGA. FINALLY, THREE DEFINITIONS OF "A PRIORI" ARE CONSIDERED. ONLY ON A FEW OF THESE DEFINITIONS DO THE CATEGORIES OF ANALYTIC, NECESSARY, AND (...)
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  26.  38
    Classifications of Degree Classes Associated with R.E. Subspaces.R. G. Downey & J. B. Remmel - 1989 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 42 (2):105-124.
    In this article we show that it is possible to completely classify the degrees of r.e. bases of r.e. vector spaces in terms of weak truth table degrees. The ideas extend to classify the degrees of complements and splittings. Several ramifications of the classification are discussed, together with an analysis of the structure of the degrees of pairs of r.e. summands of r.e. spaces.
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  27. Grue.R. G. Swinburne - 1968 - Analysis 28 (4):123.
    CONTRARY TO GOODMAN’S VIEW, A CLEAR DISTINCTION CAN BE MADE BETWEEN QUALITATIVE AND POSITIONAL PREDICATES. HENCE WE CAN EXPLAIN THAT WE OUGHT TO PROJECT ’GREEN’ RATHER THAN ’GRUE’ BECAUSE THE LATTER IS A POSITIONAL PREDICATE, RATHER THAN BECAUSE THE LATTER IS LESS WELL ENTRENCHED. A PREDICATE IS POSITIONAL IF, TO FIND OUT AS CERTAINLY AS WE CAN WHETHER IT APPLIES TO AN OBJECT, WE HAVE TO FIND OUT THE LATTER’S SPATIO-TEMPORAL LOCATION.
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  28.  25
    Splitting Properties of R. E. Sets and Degrees.R. G. Downey & L. V. Welch - 1986 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (1):88-109.
  29.  17
    Selected Writings, 1909-1953.R. G. Swinburne, Hans Reichenbach, Maria Reichenbach & Robert S. Cohen - 1980 - Philosophical Quarterly 30 (119):152.
  30.  81
    Knowledge of past and future.R. G. Swinburne - 1966 - Analysis 26 (5):166.
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  31.  53
    Duty and the Will of God.R. G. Swinburne - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):213 - 227.
    For a theist, a man's duty is to conform to the announced will of God. Yet a theist who makes this claim about duty is faced with a traditional dilemma first stated in Plato's Euthyphro—are actions which are obligatory, obligatory because God makes them so, or does God urge us to do them because they are obligatory anyway? To take the first horn of this dilemma is to claim that God can of his free choice make any action obligatory or (...)
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  32. An Essay on Philosophical Method.R. G. Collingwood - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    James Connelly and Giuseppina D'Oro present a revised edition of R. G. Collingwood's classic work of 1933, supplementing the original text with important related writings from Collingwood's manuscripts which appear here for the first time. The editors also contribute a substantial new introduction, and the volume will be welcomed by all historians of twentieth-century philosophy.
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  33.  23
    Logic, Philosophy, and History. A Study in the Philosophy of History Based on the Work of R. G. Collingwood.Eugene O. Golob, Anthony F. Russell, Brooke Williams & R. G. Collingwood - 1986 - History and Theory 25 (2):215.
  34.  13
    How Should We Measure Informed Choice? The Case of Cancer Screening.R. G. Jepson - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (4):192-196.
    Informed choice is increasingly recognised as important in supporting patient autonomy and ensuring that people are neither deceived nor coerced. In cancer screening the emphasis has shifted away from just promoting the benefits of screening to providing comprehensive information to enable people to make an informed choice. Cancer screening programmes in the UK now have policies in place which state that it is their responsibility to ensure that individuals are making an individual informed choice. There is a need to evaluate (...)
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  35.  10
    The Idea of Nature.R. G. Collingwood - 1945 - Greenwood Press.
  36. R.G. Collingwood: A Philosophy of Art.Aaron Ridley (ed.) - 1998 - Phoenix.
    Many philosophers have been interested in aesthetics, but Collingwood was passionate about art. His theories were never merely theoretical: aesthetics for him was a vivid, vibrant thing, to be experienced immediately in worked paint and in sculptured stones, in poetry and music. Art and life were no dichotomy for Collingwood - for how could you have one without the other? Works of art were created in and for the real world, to be enjoyed by real people, to enchant to enhance. (...)
     
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  37.  65
    Mythology and Monuments of Ancient Athens.G. C. R., Jane E. Harrison & Margaret de G. Verrall - 1890 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 11:218.
  38.  72
    R. G. Collingwood's Philosophy of History: PHILOSOPHY.W. H. Walsh - 1947 - Philosophy 22 (82):153-160.
    Philosophy of history is not a subject which has hitherto attracted much attention in this country. Preoccupation with the methods and achievements of the natural sciences, and distaste for the sort of rationale of history as a whole which Hegel and others offered under the title in the early nineteenth century, have served to make most British philosophers accord its problems only the most casual recognition. It is therefore all the more interesting to find an English writer of unusual powers (...)
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  39.  41
    Churchland's Metamers.Rolf G. Kuehni & C. L. Hardin - 2010 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):81-92.
    Paul Churchland proposed a conceptual framework for translating reflectance profiles into a space he takes to be the color qualia space. It allows him to determine color metamers of spectral surface reflectances without reference to the characteristics of visual systems, claiming that the reflectance classes that it specifies correspond to visually determined metamers. We advance several objections to his method, show that a significant number of reflectance profiles are not placed into the space in agreement with the qualia solid, and (...)
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  40.  26
    Undecidability of L(F∞) and Other Lattices of R.E. Substructures.R. G. Downey - 1986 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 32:17-26.
  41.  19
    Paideia.R. G. A. & Werner Jaeger - 1935 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 55 (4):257.
  42.  18
    Objective Knowledge: An Evolutionary Approach.R. G. Swinburne - 1973 - Philosophical Books 14 (2):17-20.
  43.  12
    XIII—Personal Identity.R. G. Swinburne - 1974 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74 (1):231-247.
  44.  23
    The New Leviathan.R. G. Collingwood - 1942 - Clarendon Press.
    The New Leviathan, originally published in 1942, a few months before the author's death, is the book which R. G. Collingwood chose to write in preference to ...
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  45.  13
    R.G. Collingwood's Definition of Historical Knowledge.R. B. Smith1 - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (3):350-371.
    R.G. Collingwood defined historical knowledge as essentially ‘scientific’, and saw the historian's task as the ‘re-enactment of past thoughts’. The author argues the need to go beyond Collingwood, first by demonstrating the authenticity of available evidence, and secondly, using Namier as an example, by considering methodology as well as epistemology, and the need to relate past thoughts to their present context. The ‘law of the consumption of time’ encourages historians to focus on landmark events, theories and generalisations, thus breaking from (...)
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  46.  21
    R.G. Collingwood's Definition of Historical Knowledge.R. B. Smith1 - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (3):350-371.
    R.G. Collingwood defined historical knowledge as essentially ‘scientific’, and saw the historian's task as the ‘re-enactment of past thoughts’. The author argues the need to go beyond Collingwood, first by demonstrating the authenticity of available evidence, and secondly, using Namier as an example, by considering methodology as well as epistemology, and the need to relate past thoughts to their present context. The ‘law of the consumption of time’ encourages historians to focus on landmark events, theories and generalisations, thus breaking from (...)
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  47.  98
    Did Socrates Commit Suicide?R. G. Frey - 1978 - Philosophy 53 (203):106 - 108.
    It is rarely, if at all, thought that Socrates committed suicide; but such was the case, or so I want to suggest. My suggestion turns not upon any new interpretation of ancient sources but rather upon seeking a determination of the concept of suicide itself.
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  48.  40
    The Argument for Design.R. G. Swinburne - 1984 - In J. Houston (ed.), Philosophy. Handsel Press. pp. 199-.
    The object of this paper is to show that there are no valid formal objections to the argument from design, so long as the argument is articulated with sufficient care. In particular I wish to analyse Hume's attack on the argument in Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion and to show that none of the formal objections made therein by Philo have any validity against a carefully articulated version of the argument.
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  49.  88
    Scientific Realism and the Plasticity of Mind By Paul M. Churchland Cambridge University Press, 1979, 157 Pp., £8.50. [REVIEW]R. G. Swinburne - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (212):273-.
  50.  28
    Intervals and Sublattices of the R.E. Weak Truth Table Degrees, Part I: Density.R. G. Downey - 1989 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 41 (1):1-26.
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