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R. J. Martin [4]R. J. J. Martin [1]
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  1.  3
    Changing the Educational Landscape: Philosophy, Women, and Curriculum.R. J. Martin - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44:221-221.
  2.  16
    Explaining John Freind's "History of Physick".R. J. J. Martin - 1988 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (4):399.
  3.  10
    Connections of Conversation-Based Conferences to the Foundations of Radical Constructivism.R. J. Martin - 2015 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (1):88-90.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Designing Academic Conferences in the Light of Second-Order Cybernetics” by Laurence D. Richards. Upshot: The aim of this commentary is to emphasize connections between conversation-based conferences and the foundations of radical constructivism. The Richards article needs no defense - everything said here is already implied within his text. Nevertheless, drawing out the context may be helpful in showing how his suggestions are rooted in the constructivist project.
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  4.  4
    How Change Happens with Difficulty.R. J. Martin - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 12 (1):109-110.
    Open peer commentary on the article “A Cybernetic Approach to Contextual Teaching and Learning” by Philip Baron. Upshot: I consider implications of Baron’s article on change in university education. In particular, I address the problem of why change happens with difficulty and how the principles and practices of second-order cybernetics that Baron discusses are applicable beyond South Africa to a wide range of situations.
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  5.  4
    The Importance - and the Difficulty - of Moving Beyond Linear Causality.R. J. Martin - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):521-524.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Cybernetic Foundations for Psychology” by Bernard Scott. Upshot: This commentary considers linear causality as an underlying model in science and in psychology and the difficulty of changing paradigms to include circularity and other concepts.
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