15 found
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  1. The Psychopath. Emotion and the Brain.R. J. R. Blair, D. Mitchell & K. Blair - 2005 - Blackwell.
    Psychopaths continue to be demonised by the media and estimates suggest that a disturbing percentage of the population has psychopathic tendencies. This timely and controversial new book summarises what we already know about psychopathy and antisocial behavior and puts forward a new case for its cause - with far-reaching implications. Presents the scientific facts of psychopathy and antisocial behavior. Addresses key questions, such as: What is psychopathy? Are there psychopaths amongst us? What is wrong with psychopaths? Is psychopathy due to (...)
     
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  2. Responding to the Emotions of Others: Dissociating Forms of Empathy Through the Study of Typical and Psychiatric Populations.R. J. R. Blair - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):698-718.
    Empathy is a lay term that is becoming increasingly viewed as a unitary function within the field of cognitive neuroscience. In this paper, a selective review of the empathy literature is provided. It is argued from this literature that empathy is not a unitary system but rather a loose collection of partially dissociable neurocognitive systems. In particular, three main divisions can be made: cognitive empathy , motor empathy, and emotional empathy. The two main psychiatric disorders associated with empathic dysfunction are (...)
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  3. What Emotional Responding is to Blame It Might Not Be to Responsibility.R. J. R. Blair - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (2):pp. 149-151.
  4. Passive Avoidance Learning in Individuals with Psychopathy: Modulation by Reward but Not by Punishment.R. J. R. Blair, D. G. V. Mitchell, A. Leonard, S. Budhani, K. S. Peschardt & C. Newman - 2004 - Personality and Individual Differences 37:1179–1192.
    This study investigates the ability of individuals with psychopathy to perform passive avoidance learning and whether this ability is modulated by level of reinforcement/punishment. Nineteen psychopathic and 21 comparison individuals, as defined by the Hare Psychopathy Checklist Revised (Hare, 1991), were given a passive avoidance task with a graded reinforcement schedule. Response to each rewarding number gained a point reward specific to that number (i.e., 1, 700, 1400 or 2000 points). Response to each punishing number lost a point punishment specific (...)
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  5. Somatic Markers and Response Reversal: Is There Orbitofrontal Cortex Dysfunction in Boys With Psychopathic Tendencies?R. J. R. Blair, E. Colledge & D. G. V. Mitchell - 2001 - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 29 (6):499-511.
    This study investigated the performance of boys with psychopathic tendencies and comparison boys, aged 9 to 17 years, on two tasks believed to be sensitive to amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex func- tioning. Fifty-one boys were divided into two groups according to the Psychopathy Screening Device (PSD, P. J. Frick & R. D. Hare, in press) and presented with two tasks. The tasks were the gambling task (A. Bechara, A. R. Damasio, H. Damasio, & S. W. Anderson, 1994) and the Intradimensional/ (...)
     
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  6. Risky Decisions and Response Reversal: Is There Evidence of Orbitofrontal Cortex Dysfunction in Psychopathic Individuals?D. G. V. Mitchell, E. Colledge & R. J. R. Blair - 2002 - Neuropsychologia 40:2013–2022.
    This study investigates the performance of psychopathic individuals on tasks believed to be sensitive to dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) functioning. Psychopathic and non-psychopathic individuals, as defined by the Hare psychopathy checklist revised (PCL-R) [Hare, The Hare psychopathy checklist revised, Toronto, Ontario: Multi-Health Systems, 1991] completed a gambling task [Cognition 50 (1994) 7] and the intradimensional/extradimensional (ID/ED) shift task [Nature 380 (1996) 69]. On the gambling task, psychopathic participants showed a global tendency to choose disadvantageously. Specifically, they showed an (...)
     
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  7.  45
    Moral Judgment and Psychopathy.R. J. R. Blair - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):296-298.
    Recent interest in emotion as the basis for moral development began with work involving individuals with psychopathic tendencies, and a recent paper with this population has allowed fresh insights (Glenn, Iyer, Graham, Koleva, & Haidt, 2009). Two main conclusions suggested by this paper are: (i) that systems involved in different forms of morality can be differentiated; and (ii) that systems involved in justice reasoning likely include amygdala and/or ventromedial prefrontal cortex, even if the specifics of their functional contribution to justice (...)
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  8.  19
    A Cognitive Neuroscience Approach to Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Phobia.Karina S. Blair & R. J. R. Blair - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (2):133-138.
  9.  41
    Affect and the Moral‐Conventional Distinction.R. J. R. Blair - 1997 - Journal of Moral Education 26 (2):187-196.
    Abstract The effect of inducing negative, positive or neutral affect on the recall of moral and conventional transgressions and positive moral and conventional acts was examined. It was found that inducing negative affect was associated with higher recall of moral transgressions while inducing positive affect was associated with higher recall of positive moral acts. Affect induction condition did not have a significant effect on the recall of the conventional transgressions or positive acts. The results are interpreted within the Violence Inhibition (...)
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  10.  15
    Should Affective Arousal Be Grounded in Perception-Action Coupling?R. J. R. Blair - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (1):109-110.
    Decety (2011) considers the cognitive neuroscience of empathy and, in particular, his three-component model of empathic responding. His position is highly influential with its emotional awareness/understanding and emotional regulation components representing clear extensions of previous theorizing on empathy. In this brief commentary, I will critically consider the third of his components: affective arousal. In particular, I will consider the implications of the literature to the proposed computations, based on perception—action coupling, that underlie this component of his model. I will suggest (...)
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  11.  27
    Putting Cognition Into Sociopathy.R. J. R. Blair & John Morton - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):548-548.
    We make three suggestions with regard to Mealey's work. First, her lack of a cognitive analysis of the sociopath results in underspecified mappings between sociobiology and behavior. Second, the developmental literature indicates that Mealey's implicit assumption, that moral socialisation is achieved through punishment, is invalid. Third, we advance the use of causal modelling to map the developmental relationships between biology, cognition, and behaviour.
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  12. Dolan, RJ, 109 Fletcher, EC., 109 Frackowiak, RSJ, 109 Frith, CD, 109 Frith, U., 109.W. Badecker, S. C. Baker, J. M. Beale, R. J. R. Blair, F. Cara, N. Chater, F. C. Keil, M. Miozzo, P. Mitchell & Da Norman - 1995 - Cognition 57:329.
     
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  13.  13
    Computations in Extraversion.C. Fine & R. J. R. Blair - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):521-523.
    We make two suggestions with regard to Depue & Collins's target article. First, regarding the functioning of MOC13, we provide data indicating that, contrary to D&C's apparent position, this structure is not necessary for instrumental conditioning. Second, we suggest that D&C's approach would be advanced by reference to formal computational theory, in particular the work of Grossberg. We suggest that an integration of Grossberg 's and D&C's models can provide a more complete account of extraversion.
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  14. Asmuth, J., B51.J. Atkinson, E. Balaban, E. Barenholtz, D. Bavelier, R. J. R. Blair, K. Breckenridge, N. Burgess, B. Butterworth, J. Call & J. Collins - 2006 - Cognition 101:545-546.
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  15.  21
    Emotion-Based Learning Systems and the Development of Morality.R. J. R. Blair - 2017 - Cognition 167:38-45.
    In this paper it is proposed that important components of moral development and moral judgment rely on two forms of emotional learning: stimulus-reinforcement and response-outcome learning. Data in support of this position will be primarily drawn from work with individuals with the developmental condition of psychopathy as well as fMRI studies with healthy individuals. Individuals with psychopathy show impairment on moral judgment tasks and a pronounced increased risk for instrumental antisocial behavior. It will be argued that these impairments are developmental (...)
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