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  1.  91
    But Bill . . . ?R. Melvin Keiser - 2009 - Tradition and Discovery 36 (2):43-49.
    Fascinated by Tradition and Discovery’s appreciation for Bill Poteat (35:2), I express my gratitude for his brilliant Socratic teaching and graceful mentoring; explore his evocative thought that carried further and integrated Polanyi’s tacit dimension, Merleau-Ponty’s mindbody, Wittgenstein’s linguistic meaning, and Buber’s I and Thou—all except Buber discussed in Tradition and Discovery—and look as well at his other central concerns with imagination, the dialogical, and the differences between spoken and written meaning; engage Bill in some Poteatian meditations interrogating his comments on (...)
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  2.  34
    Inaugurating Postcritical Philosophy: A Polanyian Meditation on Creation and Conversion in Augustine's Confessions.R. Melvin Keiser - 1987 - Zygon 22 (3):317-337.
  3.  49
    Reflection, Structure, and Psyche in Postcritical Perspective.R. Melvin Keiser - 1986 - Tradition and Discovery 14 (1):21-29.
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  4.  48
    More on Polanyi and Tillich on Participative Knowing.R. Melvin Keiser, Durwood Foster, Richard Gelwick & Donald Musser - 2010 - Tradition and Discovery 37 (3):19-27.
    This discussion, featuring short comments by R. Melvin Keiser, Durwood Foster, Richard Gelwick and Donald Musser, grew out of articles in TAD 35:3 (2008-2009) on connections and disconnections between the thought of Polanyi and Tillich (featuring essays by Foster and Gelwick with a response from Musser). Keiser raises questions about perspectives articulated in the earlier articles and Foster, Gelwick and Musser respond here.
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  5.  36
    Roots of Relational Ethics: Responsibility in Origin and Maturity in H. Richard Niebuhr.R. Melvin Keiser - 1996 - Oup Usa.
    H. Richard Nieburh's major work, which he did not live to complete, was to be on theological ethics. Based on the published and unpublished writings that Niebuhr completed during the last decade of his life, Roots of Relational Ethics demonstrates that Niebuhr's conception of responsibility was the culmination of his thought about self, God, Christ, the church, ethics and decision-making, and social evil. R. Melvin Keiser examines the limitations and potential of Niebuhr's use of responsibility in comparison with relevant themes (...)
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