17 found
Order:
  1.  22
    The Neoteric Poets.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (01):167-.
    In 50 B.C. Cicero writes to Atticus as follows : ‘Brundisium uenimus VII Kalend. Decembr. usi tua felicitate nauigandi; ita belle nobis flauit ab Epiro lenissimus Onchesmites. hunc si cui boles pro tuo uendito.’ The antonomasia, the euphonic sibilance, and the mannered rhythm are all prominent in Cicero's hexameter. The line is a humorously concocted example of affected and Grecizing narrative. But it is also a line which, Atticus is to suppose, would value; presumably therefore it is meant to hit (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  2.  18
    Horace odes book 1 and the alexandrian edition of alcaeus.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (02):542-558.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  13
    Vergil and the Politics of War.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (01):188-.
    The Romans had various ways of justifying their imperial aims and methods, some high-minded, some less so. We find in particular that they could give honourable and satisfying explanations of their aims and methods in war. Here for example is Cicero: quare suscipienda quidem bella sunt ob earn causam, ut sine iniuria in pace uiuatur; parta autem uictoria conseruandi ii, qui non crudeles in bello, non immanes fuerunt, ut maiores nostri Tusculanos, Aequos…in ciuitatem etiam acceperunt, at Carthaginem…funditus sustulerunt…mea quidem sententia (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  33
    A Hard Look at Catullus.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (01):34-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  7
    Ciris 89–91.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1975 - Classical Quarterly 25 (01):156-.
    The most popular emendation has been Heinsius's somnia sunt. I find the tone of this misplaced. Thepoet has since 66 laboriously catalogued variant aetiologies of Scylla monstrum. It is inappropriate that he should immediately follow this with the statement that all of them were ‘fancy’ or ‘nonsense’. For a start, we may note that the summation quidquid et ut quisque … presumably includes the version of Homer, to whose authority the poet had appealed in the case of the erroneous contamination (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  17
    Ciris 85–6.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1971 - The Classical Review 21 (03):323-324.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  25
    Love and death: Laodamia and Protesilaus in Catullus, Propertius, and others1.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):200-.
    In one form or another an elevated, pleasure-transcending view of love is common, we might say natural. For readers of Latin poetry Catullus is perhaps the most impressive spokesman. In many respects, of course, Catullus is special. His particular values and choice of terminology, in his time and situation, mark him out from his crowd; in the Roman world indeed, ‘whole love’, perhaps rather its utterance, is hard to document before him. But a belief that love is powerful and profound, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  12
    Love and death: Laodamia and Protesilaus in Catullus, Propertius, and others.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (1):200-212.
    In one form or another an elevated, pleasure-transcending view of love is common, we might say natural. For readers of Latin poetry Catullus is perhaps the most impressive spokesman. In many respects, of course, Catullus is special. His particular values and choice of terminology, in his time and situation, mark him out from his crowd; in the Roman world indeed, ‘whole love’, perhaps rather its utterance, is hard to document before him. But a belief that love is powerful and profound, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  5
    Notes on Catullus.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52 (2):600-608.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  23
    Review. A Companion to the Study of Virgil. N Horsfall [ed].R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (2):383-384.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  39
    Servitium Amoris.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (01):117-.
    In this paper I shall be examining the nature and provenance of what many people state or imply to be a traditional, conventional, even trite figure of speech: the Augustan Elegists' figure of the ‘seruitium amoris’’. It is indeed a very frequent image in the Elegists. As. F. O. Copley says: ‘Of all the figures used by the Roman elegists, probably none is quite so familiar as that of the lover as slave.’’ But frequency does not equal triteness nor traditionality.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  13
    The Dating of the Ciris.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1971 - Classical Quarterly 21 (01):233-.
    Once we have accepted that the Ciris stems from neither Virgil nor Gallus, but was written by a post-Virgilian poetaster, the obvious task for us is to try and formulate some more specific idea of the date of the poem. I think that it has been sufficiently proved that the Ciris is not only post-Virgilian, but post-Ovidian in origin, including as it does unquestionable imitations of that author. But this, to date, is really as far as we have got. It (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  21
    The Dating of the Ciris.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1971 - Classical Quarterly 21 (1):233-253.
    Once we have accepted that theCirisstems from neither Virgil nor Gallus, but was written by a post-Virgilian poetaster, the obvious task for us is to try and formulate some more specific idea of the date of the poem. I think that it has been sufficiently proved that theCirisis not only post-Virgilian, but post-Ovidian in origin, including as it does unquestionable imitations of that author. But this, to date, is really as far as we have got. It is the purpose of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  35
    A Hard Look at Catullus David O. Ross: Style and Tradition in Catullus. Pp.viii + 188. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1969. Cloth, £2.90 net. [REVIEW]R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (01):34-37.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  33
    Infelix Virgo Daniel Knecht: Ciris: Authenticité, histoire du texte, édition et commentaire critiques. Pp. xc+169. Bruges: De Tempel, 1970. Cloth. [REVIEW]R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (02):168-171.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  6
    An Approach to Roman Poetry. [REVIEW]R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (2):218-221.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  7
    Transiet Aetas Qvam Cito. [REVIEW]R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1980 - The Classical Review 30 (1):20-22.