Results for 'R. Sigurdson'

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  1.  8
    Jacob Burckhardt's Liberal-Conservatism.R. Sigurdson - 1992 - History of Political Thought 13 (3):487.
    Without in any way denying that �Burckhardt�s political thought is culture-critique in its essence�, I want to suggest that the task ahead for Burckhardt scholarship is to attempt to do something that Burckhardt himself refused to do, namely to outline a Burckhardtian political philosophy and prepare an analysis of its key principles. What, we have to ask ourselves, is the relationship between Burckhardt the politically astute cultural historian and a Burckhardtian political philosophy? How, for instance, do Burckhardt''s various writings reveal (...)
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  2.  22
    Slavoj Žižek, the Death Drive, and Zombies: A Theological Account.Ola Sigurdson - 2013 - Modern Theology 29 (3):361-380.
    In this article, I discuss the question of the hybridity of the religious and the secular through the example of the Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek and his psychoanalytically inspired notion of the undead. The undead is Žižek's rendering of the Freudian death drive, and as the undead is instantiated in the popular culture cliché of the zombies, we need to look no further than to George A. Romero's classic zombie movie Night of the Living Dead from 1968. Thus, this article (...)
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  3.  13
    Beyond Secularism? Towards a Post‐Secular Political Theology.Ola Sigurdson - 2010 - Modern Theology 26 (2):177-196.
    In this article I analyse some of the reasons for a recent, resurgent interest in religion and theology by political philosophers and relate this interest to an inherent instability in modernity itself. In the first part I describe the landscape of current political philosophy with a particular emphasis on radical philosophers. In the second part I describe how the liberal distinction between religion and politics generates a theological instability due to the effective disappearance of the social embodiment of religion within (...)
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  4.  9
    A Hermeneutic of Hope: Problematising Žižek’s Apocalypticism.Ola Sigurdson - 2016 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 10 (2).
    In this paper, I wish to problematize Slavoj Žižek’s use of the apocalyptic tradition in his political philosophy, especially focusing on the consequences it has for his understanding of hope. Especially, I find his strong emphasis on the disjunction between the state before and after the radical event implies a radical discontinuity between the present state and the state of emancipation, that the possibility falls away of any kind of criteria for a useful distinction between authentic and inauthentic events. Such (...)
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  5.  11
    Pascal Crozet;, Annick Horiuchi . Traduire, transposer, naturaliser: La formation d’une langue scientifique moderne hors des frontieres de l’Europe au XIXe siecle. xxx + 262 pp. Paris: L’Harmattan, 2004. [REVIEW]Jon Sigurdson - 2005 - Isis 96 (1):127-128.
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  6. Theology and Marxism in Eagleton and Žižek: A Conspiracy of Hope.Ola Sigurdson - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
  7. I—R. M. Sainsbury and Michael Tye: An Originalist Theory of Concepts.R. M. Sainsbury & Michael Tye - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):101-124.
    We argue that thoughts are structures of concepts, and that concepts should be individuated by their origins, rather than in terms of their semantic or epistemic properties. Many features of cognition turn on the vehicles of content, thoughts, rather than on the nature of the contents they express. Originalism makes concepts available to explain, with no threat of circularity, puzzling cases concerning thought. In this paper, we mention Hesperus/Phosphorus puzzles, the Evans-Perry example of the ship seen through different windows, and (...)
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  8.  33
    I—R. Jay Wallace: Duties of Love.R. Jay Wallace - 2012 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):175-198.
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  9.  16
    Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer.Creso Sá, Andrew Kretz & Kristjan Sigurdson - 2013 - Minerva 51 (4):443-464.
    Our historical study of Canada’s main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism—a response to Canada’s perceived dependency on the United States’ science and technology. Technological nationalism provided a symbol for producing a shared understanding of the desirability and appropriateness of technology transfer that legitimated the commercial activities of university scientists.
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  10. The Body Unbound: Philosophical Perspectives on Politics, Embodiment and Religion.Marius Timmann Mjaaland, Ola Sigurdson & Sigríður Þorgeirsdóttir (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
     
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  11.  44
    R.S. Peters and Moral Education, 1: The Justification of Procedural Principles.R. J. Royce - 1983 - Journal of Moral Education 12 (3):174-181.
    Abstract In this article, which is the first of two to examine the ideas of R. S. Peters on moral education, consideration is given to his justificatory arguments found in Ethics and Education. Here he employs presupposition arguments to show to what anyone engaging in moral discourse is committed. The result is a group of procedural principles which are recommended to be employed in moral education. This article is an attempt to examine the presupposition arguments Peters employs, to comment on (...)
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  12.  81
    The Objectivity of Morality: R. G. Swinburne.R. G. Swinburne - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (195):5-20.
    If I say “we are now living in England” or “grass is green in summer’ or ‘the cat is on the mat’ what I say will normally be true or false—the statements are true if they correctly report how things are, or correspond to the facts; and if they do not do these things, they are false. Such a statement will only fail to have a truth-value if its referring expressions fail to refer ; or if the statement lies on (...)
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  13.  19
    The Lonely Crowd: A Study of the Changing American Character. By R. L. Meier and E. C. Banfield.R. L. Meier - 1951 - Ethics 62 (2):135-136.
  14.  51
    Normativity and the Will: R. Jay Wallace.R. Jay Wallace - 2004 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 55:195-216.
    If there is room for a substantial conception of the will in contemporary theorizing about human agency, it is most likely to be found in the vicinity of the phenomenon of normativity. Rational agency is distinctively responsive to the agent's acknowledgment of reasons, in the basic sense of considerations that speak for and against the alternatives for action that are available. Furthermore, it is natural to suppose that this kind of responsiveness to reasons is possible only for creatures who possess (...)
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  15.  12
    A Note on ${\Bf R}$-Mingle and Sobociński's Three-Valued Logic.R. Zane Parks - 1972 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 13 (2):227-228.
  16.  24
    The Christian Wager: R. G. SWINBURNE.R. G. Swinburne - 1969 - Religious Studies 4 (2):217-228.
    On what grounds will the rational man become a Christian? It is often assumed by many, especially non-Christians, that he will become a Christian if and only if he judges that the evidence available to him shows that it is more likely than not that the Christian theological system is true, that, in mathematical terms, on the evidence available to him, the probability of its truth is greater than half. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate whether or (...)
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  17.  27
    Moral Tales: R. A. Sharpe.R. A. Sharpe - 1992 - Philosophy 67 (260):155-168.
    In the 11th chapter of the second book of Samuel, we read how King David saw Bathsheba in the evening: ‘v.2. And it came to pass in an eveningtide, that David arose from off his bed, and walked upon the roof of the king's house: and from the roof he saw a woman washing herself; and the woman was very beautiful to look upon.’.
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  18.  79
    What Logic Should We Think With?: R. M. Sainsbury.R. M. Sainsbury - 2002 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 51:1-17.
    Logic ought to guide our thinking. It is better, more rational, more intelligent to think logically than to think illogically. Illogical thought leads to bad judgment and error. In any case, if logic had no role to play as a guide to thought, why should we bother with it? The somewhat naïve opinions of the previous paragraph are subject to attack from many sides. It may be objected that an activity does not count as thinking at all unless it is (...)
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  19.  43
    The Greeks and the Irrational. By E. R. Dodds. Pp. Ix + 327. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press , 1951. 37s. 6d. [REVIEW]H. J. Rose & E. R. Dodds - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73 (105):176-177.
    In this philosophy classic, which was first published in 1951, E. R. Dodds takes on the traditional view of Greek culture as a triumph of rationalism. Using the analytical tools of modern anthropology and psychology, Dodds asks, "Why should we attribute to the ancient Greeks an immunity from 'primitive' modes of thought which we do not find in any society open to our direct observation?" Praised by reviewers as "an event in modern Greek scholarship" and "a book which it would (...)
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  20.  25
    God, Christ and Possibilities: R. L. STURCH.R. L. Sturch - 1980 - Religious Studies 16 (1):81-84.
    I propose to begin with some fairly unexciting and uncontroversial remarks about possibility-statements, and then in their light to examine two problems philosophers have raised about certain statements of this kind which might be made in Christian theology where it touches on the doctrine of the Incarnation.
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  21.  53
    A Late and Shifting Foundation: A Commentary on Djulbegovic, B., Guyatt, G. H. & Ashcroft, R. E. (2009) Cancer Control, 16, 158–168. [REVIEW]Mark R. Tonelli - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):907-909.
  22.  30
    Russell on Acquaintance: R. M. Sainsbury.R. M. Sainsbury - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 20:219-244.
    In Russell's Problems of Philosophy, acquaintance is the basis of thought and also the basis of empirical knowledge. Thought is based on acquaintance, in that a thinker has to be acquainted with the basic constituents of his thoughts. Empirical knowledge is based on acquaintance, in that acquaintance is involved in perception, and perception is the ultimate source of all empirical knowledge.
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  23.  20
    Plato's Earlier Dialectic. By R. Robinson. 2nd Edition. Pp. X + 286. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1953. 25s. [REVIEW]J. Tate & R. Robinson - 1955 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 75:168-169.
  24.  50
    Completely Mitotic R.E. Degrees.R. G. Downey & T. A. Slaman - 1989 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 41 (2):119-152.
  25. The Argument From Design—a Defence: R. G. SWINBURNE.R. G. Swinburne - 1972 - Religious Studies 8 (3):193-205.
    Mr Olding's recent attack on my exposition of the argument from design gives me an opportunity to defend the central theses of my original article. My article pointed out that there were arguments from design of two types—those which take as their premisses regularities of copresence and those which take as their premisses regularities of succession. I sought to defend an argument of the second type. One merit of such an argument is that there is no doubt about the truth (...)
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  26. Could Kant Have Been A Utilitarian?*: R. M. Hare.R. M. Hare - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (1):1-16.
    … the supreme end, the happiness of all mankind. The law concerning punishment is a Categorical Imperative; and woe to him who rummages around in the winding paths of a theory of happiness, looking for some advantage to be gained by releasing the criminal from punishment or by reducing the amount of it.
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  27.  49
    R. Budd Dwyer: A Case Study in Newsroom Decision Making.Patrick R. Parsons & William E. Smith - 1988 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 3 (1):84 – 94.
    In late January of 1987, the State Treasurer of Pennsylvania, R. Budd Dwyer, shot himself to death in front of a dozen reporters and camera crews during a news conference in his office. Much was subsequently made in the popular press, and within the profession, about the difficult ethical decision television journalists were faced with in determining how much of the very graphic suicide tape to air. A review of the literature in this area suggests, however, that journalists have established (...)
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  28. R. Buckminster Fuller on Education.R. Buckminster Fuller - 1979 - University of Massachusetts Press.
     
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  29.  70
    On Philosophy's Progress: From Plato to Wittgenstein : R. Read.R. Read - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (3):341-367.
    I argue that the type of progress exhibited by philosophy is not that exhibited by science, but rather is akin to the kind of progress exhibited be someone becoming ‘older and wiser’. However, as actually-existing philosophy has gotten older, it has not always gotten wiser. As an illustration, I consider Rawls's conception of justification. I argue that Rawls's notion of what it is to have a philosophical justification exhibits no progress at all from Euthyphro's. In fact, drawing on a remark (...)
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  30. HARE, R. M. - The Language of Morals. [REVIEW]R. B. Braithwaite - 1954 - Mind 63:249.
     
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  31. A Philosophical Autobiography: R. M. Hare.R. M. Hare - 2002 - Utilitas 14 (3):269-305.
    I had a strange dream, or half-waking vision, not long ago. I found myself at the top of a mountain in the mist, feeling very pleased with myself, not just for having climbed the mountain, but for having achieved my life's ambition, to find a way of answering moral questions rationally. But as I was preening myself on this achievement, the mist began to clear, and I saw that I was surrounded on the mountain top by the graves of all (...)
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  32.  22
    The Problem of the Divine Eternity: R. L. STURCH.R. L. Sturch - 1974 - Religious Studies 10 (4):487-493.
    The ‘traditional’ view among philosophical theologians, that God is eternal not merely in the sense of being everlasting but in the sense of being outside time altogether, has come under sharp criticism in recent years, both from biblical theologians and from philosophers. It is against the latter form of attack, particularly as represented by the detailed criticisms of Professor Nelson Pike, that I wish to try and defend the notion of a divine timelessness.
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  33.  13
    Educability and Group Differences By Arthur R. Jensen.R. Darrell Bock - 1974 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 17 (4):594-597.
  34.  23
    The Post‐Secular Condition: Religion, Modernity, Politics – By Ola Sigurdson.Jan‐Olav Henriksen - 2011 - Modern Theology 27 (3):528-530.
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  35.  5
    Theology and Marxism in Eagleton and Zizek: A Conspiracy of Hope. By Ola Sigurdson. Pp. X, 243, Basingstoke/NY, Palgrave Macmillan 2012, £58.00. [REVIEW]Hugo Meynell - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (3):518-519.
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  36. Responsibility and the Moral Sentiments.R. Jay Wallace - 1994 - Harvard University Press.
    R. Jay Wallace argues in this book that moral accountability hinges on questions of fairness: When is it fair to hold people morally responsible for what they do? Would it be fair to do so even in a deterministic world? To answer these questions, we need to understand what we are doing when we hold people morally responsible, a stance that Wallace connects with a central class of moral sentiments, those of resentment, indignation, and guilt. To hold someone responsible, he (...)
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  37.  13
    R.G. Collingwood's Definition of Historical Knowledge.R. B. Smith1 - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (3):350-371.
    R.G. Collingwood defined historical knowledge as essentially ‘scientific’, and saw the historian's task as the ‘re-enactment of past thoughts’. The author argues the need to go beyond Collingwood, first by demonstrating the authenticity of available evidence, and secondly, using Namier as an example, by considering methodology as well as epistemology, and the need to relate past thoughts to their present context. The ‘law of the consumption of time’ encourages historians to focus on landmark events, theories and generalisations, thus breaking from (...)
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  38.  21
    R.G. Collingwood's Definition of Historical Knowledge.R. B. Smith1 - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (3):350-371.
    R.G. Collingwood defined historical knowledge as essentially ‘scientific’, and saw the historian's task as the ‘re-enactment of past thoughts’. The author argues the need to go beyond Collingwood, first by demonstrating the authenticity of available evidence, and secondly, using Namier as an example, by considering methodology as well as epistemology, and the need to relate past thoughts to their present context. The ‘law of the consumption of time’ encourages historians to focus on landmark events, theories and generalisations, thus breaking from (...)
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  39.  24
    Splitting Properties of R. E. Sets and Degrees.R. G. Downey & L. V. Welch - 1986 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (1):88-109.
  40.  35
    PFA Implies ADL(R).John R. Steel - 2005 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 70 (4):1255 - 1296.
  41. Ultimate Responsibility and Dumb Luck*: ALFRED R. MELE.Alfred R. Mele - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):274-293.
    My topic lies on conceptual terrain that is quite familiar to philosophers. For others, a bit of background may be in order. In light of what has filtered down from quantum mechanics, few philosophers today believe that the universe is causally deterministic. That is, to use Peter van Inwagen's succinct definition of “determinism,” few philosophers believe that “there is at any instant exactly one physically possible future.” Even so, partly for obvious historical reasons, philosophers continue to argue about whether free (...)
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  42.  28
    Philosophies of Education: R. J. Haack.R. J. Haack - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (196):159-176.
    It is commonly supposed that the philosophy of education is not a reputable area of concern for a philosopher. I have never heard a coherent, sustained and successful case made for this view. Only vague remarks about ‘autonomy’ and narrowly protectionist views of philosophy are ventured. So I shall not discuss the matter further. I shall simply be content to side with Plato, Aristotle, Comenius, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill and Dewey, who thought that educational issues fell within the province of (...)
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  43. Dworkin on Equality of Resources: Hal R. Varian.Hal R. Varian - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):110-125.
    This essay is a review of Ronald Dworkin's recent essay on equality of resources. Many of the ideas discussed by Dworkin have also been examined by economists with, I believe, considerable insight. Unfortunately, economists tend to write for economists, not for philosophers, and their insights are seldom communicated properly to noneconomists. Of course, the same criticism can be levied on philosophers! But perhaps legal theorists are less subject to this criticism. One of the great contributions of Dworkin is that he (...)
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  44.  35
    Classifications of Degree Classes Associated with R.E. Subspaces.R. G. Downey & J. B. Remmel - 1989 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 42 (2):105-124.
    In this article we show that it is possible to completely classify the degrees of r.e. bases of r.e. vector spaces in terms of weak truth table degrees. The ideas extend to classify the degrees of complements and splittings. Several ramifications of the classification are discussed, together with an analysis of the structure of the degrees of pairs of r.e. summands of r.e. spaces.
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  45.  96
    ACT-R: A Higher-Level Account of Processing Capacity.John R. Anderson, Christian Lebiere, Marsha Lovett & Lynne Reder - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):831-832.
    We present an account of processing capacity in the ACT-R theory. At the symbolic level, the number of chunks in the current goal provides a measure of relational complexity. At the subsymbolic level, limits on spreading activation, measured by the attentional parameter W, provide a theory of processing capacity, which has been applied to performance, learning, and individual differences data.
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  46.  71
    Moore's Defence of Common Sense: A Reappraisal After Fifty Years: R. E. Tully.R. E. Tully - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (197):289-306.
    G. E. Moore's ‘A Defence of Common Sense’ has generated the kind of interest and contrariety which often accompany what is new, provocative, and even important in philosophy. Moore himself reportedly agreed with Wittgenstein's estimate that this was his best article, while C. D. Broad has lamented its very great but largely unfortunate influence. Although the essay inspired Wittgenstein to explore the basis of Moore's claim to know many propositions of common sense to be true, A. J. Ayer judges its (...)
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  47.  73
    Questions About the Meaning of Life: R. W. HEPBURN.R. W. Hepburn - 1966 - Religious Studies 1 (2):125-140.
    Claims about ‘the meaning of life’ have tended to be made and discussed in conjunction with bold metaphysical and theological affirmations. For life to have meaning, there must be a comprehensive divine plan to give it meaning, or there must be an intelligible cosmic process with a ‘telos’ that a man needs to know if his life is to be meaningfully orientated. Or, it is thought to be a condition of the meaningfulness of life, that values should be ultimately ‘conserved’ (...)
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  48.  14
    The Interpretation of Plato's Republic. By N. R. Murphy. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1951. Pp. Vii + 247. 18s.J. Tate & N. R. Murphy - 1954 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:200-201.
  49.  28
    Form in Aristotle: Universal or Particular?: R. D. Sykes.R. D. Sykes - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (193):311-331.
    In this paper I ask whether in Aristotle's metaphysical system the form of a non-living sensible substance, such as the form of this house, is or is not universal. I argue that his position as it stands is self-contradictory, and then try to give some account of the pressures that led to this central contradiction in Aristotle's metaphysical thought.
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  50.  25
    Optimism and Pessimism: STEWART R. SUTHERLAND.Stewart R. Sutherland - 1981 - Religious Studies 17 (4):537-548.
    My argument will be that our understanding of human beings, which is what I take the Christian doctrine of man to be concerned with, will benefit considerably from an examination of two different but related clusters of human attitudes which can be found respectively under the headings ‘optimism’ and ‘pessimism’. There are many pitfalls in the way of such an enterprise, and occasionally some prejudices to be overcome. For example L. E. Loemker in the relevant articles in the Encyclopedia of (...)
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