Results for 'R2P (Responsibility to Protect)'

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  1. Responsibility to Protect and Militarized Humanitarian Intervention: When and Why the Churches Failed to Discern Moral Hazard.Esther D. Reed - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):308-334.
    This essay addresses moral hazards associated with the emerging doctrine of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). It reviews the broad acceptance by the Vatican and the World Council of Churches of the doctrine between September 2003 and September 2008, and attempts to identify grounds for more adequate investigation of the moral issues arising. Three themes are pursued: how a changing political context is affecting notions of sovereignty; the authority that can approve or refuse the use of force; and plural foundations (...)
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    Responsibility to Protect and Militarized Humanitarian Intervention.Esther D. Reed - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):183-208.
    My essay “Responsibility to Protect and Militarized Humanitarian Intervention: When and Why the Churches Failed to Discern Moral Hazard” (JRE 40.2) called for more questioning engagement with R2P than the broadly uncritical welcome given by the churches to the doctrine between September 2003 and September 2008. In response to Luke Glanville's reply, this essay identifies further reasons for caution before accepting R2P and so-called humanitarian wars alongside defensive wars as paradigmatically justified. It is structured with reference to the tests in (...)
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    In Defense of the Responsibility to Protect.Luke Glanville - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):169-182.
    This essay responds to Esther Reed's recent critique of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principle in this journal. It argues that Reed fundamentally misunderstands and misrepresents R2P. Her critique of R2P would have served well as a critique of the earlier concept of humanitarian intervention had it been penned in the late 1990s. But most of the problems and dangers that Reed identifies are in reality the very problems and dangers that R2P seeks to overcome, and I suggest that it (...)
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  4. From Humanitarian Intervention (HI) to Responsibility to Protect (R2P).Dorota Gierycz - 2010 - Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):110-128.
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    Framing and Reframing R2P—a Responsibility to Protect Humanity From Evil.Christof Royer - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-24.
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    Muslim Governance and the Duty to Protect.Irene Oh - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):15-19.
    In this response to Johnson, Oh reaffirms the scholarly vision of Kelsay and Twiss, elaborates upon Muslim perspectives on human rights, and questions the emphasis on violent humanitarian interventions as part of the Responsibility to Protect mandate. Oh suggests that, in light of the historical relationship between Muslim and non-Muslim states and the aftermath of the second Iraq War, more consideration be given to the rebuilding of Muslim-majority societies. Oh also highlights the concept of duty as a religiously based ideal (...)
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    Kant and the Responsibility to Protect.Jennifer Mei Sze Ang - 2015 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):37-51.
    Since the World Summit endorsed the Responsibility to Protect document in 2005, a growing number of governments have begun to shape their foreign policies with R2P in mind. This paper seeks to clarify the basis, the nature, and the extent of our duty-to-others in the situations specified by R2P by bringing together current concerns and discussions surrounding the conceptualization of R2P as an imperfect duty. I begin by demonstrating that our imperfect duties to others are not optional, that Kantian imperfect (...)
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    Allies in Tension: Identifying and Bridging the Rift Between R2p and Just War.Henrik Friberg-Fernros - 2011 - Journal of Military Ethics 10 (3):160-173.
    Abstract It has become almost commonplace to regard the concepts of Responsibility to Protect (R2P) and Just War as not only compatible but rather closely connected. Contrary to this position I argue here that some Just War criteria are in significant tension with R2P. This tension results from the fact that Just War only makes war permitted while R2P prescribes an obligation. But R2P and Just War not only are in significant tension, but also suffer from inverted weaknesses: R2P is (...)
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    Justified Drone Strikes Are Predicated on R2P Norms.Todd Burkhardt - 2015 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (2):167-176.
    The US has conducted or routinely conducts personality and signature drone strikes into Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, and most likely other states as well. The US does this in order to disrupt, dismantle, and defeat terrorist organizations. In some of these attacks, states have given their expressed or tacit consent to the US to conduct these drone strikes. However, some states do not consent to the US conducting kinetic drone strikes within their territory. In these cases, it seems (...)
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    Global Policy and the United Nations.John W. Lango - 2009 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):105-115.
    President Barack Obama should strive to realize the ideal goals expressed in the UN Charter. Accordingly, the concept of U.S. foreign policy should be replaced by a concept of UN global policy. Relatedly, the traditional concept of national security should be replaced by a cosmopolitan concept of global state and human security. Topics discussed include the role of the Security Council, the responsibility to protect (R2P), just war principles, UN peacekeeping operations, genocide in Darfur, treaties and other sources of international (...)
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