Results for 'RFID'

25 found
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  1. RFID: The Next Serious Threat to Privacy. [REVIEW]Vance Lockton & Richard S. Rosenberg - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (4):221-231.
    Radio Frequency Identification, or RFID, is a technology which has been receiving considerable attention as of late. It is a fairly simple technology involving radio wave communication between a microchip and an electronic reader, in which an identification number stored on the chip is transmitted and processed; it can frequently be found in inventory tracking and access control systems. In this paper, we examine the current uses of RFID, as well as identifying potential future uses of the technology, (...)
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  2.  23
    Technology Regulation Policy for Business Ethics: An Example of RFID in Supply Chain Management. [REVIEW]Wei Zhou & Selwyn Piramuthu - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):327-340.
    With the increase in use of a technology, its misuse possibility also increases in general. Moreover, there are instances where new technologies are implemented without thoroughly testing for vulnerabilities. We consider RFID, a disruptive technology, and related vulnerabilities in existing supply chain applications from an ethics perspective. We develop an extended ethics model to incorporate the effects of emerging information and communication technologies, specifically that of RFID systems, including technology selection, social consequences, and practitioners’ rationality. We introduce a (...)
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  3.  13
    RFID: Human Agency and Meaning in Information-Intensive Environments.N. Katherine Hayles - 2009 - Theory, Culture and Society 26 (2-3):47-72.
    RFID tags, small microchips no bigger than grains of rice, are currently being embedded in product labels, clothing, credit cards, and the environment, among other sites. Activated by the appropriate receiver, they transmit information ranging from product information such as manufacturing date, delivery route, and location where the item was purchased to the name, address, and credit history of the person holding the card. Active RFIDs have the capacity to transmit data without having to be activated by a receiver; (...)
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  4. Ethical Implications of Implantable Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Tags in Humans.Kenneth R. Foster & Jan Jaeger - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):44 – 48.
    This article reviews the use of implantable radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags in humans, focusing on the VeriChip (VeriChip Corporation, Delray Beach, FL) and the associated VeriMed patient identification system. In addition, various nonmedical applications for implanted RFID tags in humans have been proposed. The technology offers important health and nonhealth benefits, but raises ethical concerns, including privacy and the potential for coercive implantation of RFID tags in individuals. A national discussion is needed to identify the limits of (...)
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  5.  8
    Reordering the “World of Things”: The Sociotechnical Imaginary of RFID Tagging and New Geographies of Responsibility.Ulrike Felt & Susanne Öchsner - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (5):1425-1446.
    The aim of this study is to investigate radio frequency identification tagging as a form of sociotechnical experimentation and the kinds of sociotechnical futures at stake in this experimentation. For this purpose, a detailed analysis of a publicly available promotional video by a tag producer for the fashion industry, a sector widely using RFID tags, was analysed in detail. The results of the study indicated that the sociotechnical imaginary of RFID tagging gravitates around the core value of perfect (...)
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  6. Curbing Economic Crime with RFID Enabled Currency.Lorne D. Booker & Nick Bontis - 2010 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 5 (1/2):26-37.
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  7.  24
    Opinion Exchange Convergence Support Using RFID Tags.Wataru Sunayama & Yoshifumi Shimizu - 2011 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 26 (5):527-535.
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  8.  13
    Geometry Based Analysis of an Alternative RFID Interrogator Placement for Electronic Vehicle Identification.A. J. Hoffman, A. Pretorius & Y. Wang - unknown
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  9.  16
    RFID and Corporate Responsibility: Hidden Costs in RFID Implementation.Mehmet Barut, Robert Brown, Nicole Freund, Jonathan May & Elizabeth Reinhart - 2006 - Business and Society Review 111 (3):287-303.
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  10.  15
    La RFID : un risque de traçage généralisé : Traçabilité et réseaux.Michel Arnaud - 2009 - Hermès: La Revue Cognition, communication, politique 53 (1):109.
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  11.  4
    La RFID : un risque de traçage généralisé : Traçabilité et réseaux.Michel Arnaud - 2009 - Hermes 53:109.
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  12.  11
    Implantable Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Tags Are Not Tattoos.Ari Z. Zivotofsky, Naomi T. S. Zivotofsky & Alan Jotkowitz - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):52-53.
  13. O./Weigelin, L. I Deiters, W. I Ritz, A. I Kaltenborn, R.: Ein-satzbereiche und Potenziale der RFID-Technologie im Deutschen Gesundheits-wesen. Stuttgart. [REVIEW]Ki Koch Gassner - 2007 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 1.
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  14. Special Session on Computational Intelligence Approaches and Methods for Security Engineering-A Study on the Improvement of Military Logistics System Using RFID.Mingyun Kang, Minseong Ju, Taihoon Kim, Geuk Leek & Kyung Sung - 2006 - In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 1098-1102.
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  15.  54
    An Ethical Exploration of Privacy and Radio Frequency Identification.Alan R. Peslak - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):327-345.
    This manuscript reviews the background of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) as well as the ethical foundations of individual privacy. This includes a historical perspective on personal privacy, a review of the United States Constitutional privacy interpretations, the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, European Union Regulations, as well as the positions of industry and advocacy groups. A brief review of the information technology ethics literature is also included. The RFID privacy concerns are three-fold: pre-sales activities, sales transaction activities, (...)
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  16.  29
    An Enquiry Into the Ethical Efficacy of the Use of Radio Frequency Identification Technology.David M. Wasieleski & Mordechai Gal-Or - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):27-40.
    This paper provides an in-depth analysis of the privacy rights dilemma surrounding radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. As one example of ubiquitous information system, RFID has multitudinous applications in various industries and businesses across society. The use of this technology will have to lead to a policy setting dilemma in that a balance between individuals’ privacy concerns and the benefits that they derive from it must be drawn. After describing the basic RFID technology some of its most (...)
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  17.  77
    Chips, Tags and Scanners: Ethical Challenges for Radio Frequency Identification. [REVIEW]Dara J. Glasser, Kenneth W. Goodman & Norman G. Einspruch - 2007 - Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):101-109.
    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems identify and track objects, animals and, in principle, people. The ability to gather information obtained by tracking consumer goods, government documents, monetary transactions and human beings raises a number of interesting and important privacy issues. Moreover, RFID systems pose an ensemble of other ethical challenges related to appropriate uses and users of such systems. This paper reviews a number of RFID applications with the intention of identifying the technology’s benefits and possible misuses. (...)
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  18.  33
    Ethical Considerations and Proposed Guidelines for the Use of Radio Frequency Identification: Especially Concerning its Use for Promoting Public Safety and National Security. [REVIEW]Vladimir Labay & Amber McKee Anderson - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):265-272.
    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is quickly growing in its applications. A variety of uses for the technology are beginning to be developed, including chips which can be used in identification cards, in individual items, and for human applications, allowing a chip to be embedded under the skin. Such chips could provide numerous benefits ranging from day-to-day convenience to the increased ability of the federal government to adequately ensure the safety of its citizens. However, there are also valid concerns about (...)
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  19.  39
    The Introduction of Online Authentication as Part of the New Electronic National Identity Card in Germany.Torsten Noack & Herbert Kubicek - 2010 - Identity in the Information Society 3 (1):87-110.
    This chapter provides an analysis of the long process of introducing an electronic identity for online authentication in Germany. This process is described as a multi-facet innovation, involving actors from different policy fields shifting over time. The eID process started in the late ‘90s in the context of eGovernment and eCommerce with the legislation on e-signatures, which were supposed to allow for online authentication of citizens. When after 5 years it was recognized that this was not the case, a new (...)
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  20.  31
    Philosophy, Privacy, and Pervasive Computing.Diane P. Michelfelder - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (1):61-70.
    Philosophers and others concerned with the moral good of personal privacy most often see threats to privacy raised by the development of pervasive computing as primarily being threats to the loss of control over personal information. Two reasons in particular lend this approach plausibility. One reason is that the parallels between pervasive computing and ordinary networked computing, where everyday transactions over the Internet raise concerns about personal information privacy, appear stronger than their differences. Another reason is that the individual devices (...)
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  21.  22
    Nanotechnology and Privacy.Jeroen van den Hoven - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):215-228.
    The development of ever smaller integrated circuits at the sub-micron and nanoscale—in accordance with Moore’s Law—drives the production of very small tags, smart cards, smart labels and sensors. Nanoelectronics and submicron technology supports surveillance technology which is practically invisible. I argue that one of the most urgent and immediate concerns associated with nanotechnology is privacy. Computing in the twenty-first century will not only be pervasive and ubiquitous, but also inconspicuous. If these features are not counteracted in design, they will facilitate (...)
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  22.  11
    Nanotechnology and Privacy.Jeroen van den Hoven - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):215-228.
    The development of ever smaller integrated circuits at the sub-micron and nanoscale—in accordance with Moore’s Law—drives the production of very small tags, smart cards, smart labels and sensors. Nanoelectronics and submicron technology supports surveillance technology which is practically invisible. I argue that one of the most urgent and immediate concerns associated with nanotechnology is privacy. Computing in the twenty-first century will not only be pervasive and ubiquitous, but also inconspicuous. If these features are not counteracted in design, they will facilitate (...)
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  23.  12
    Creating Practical Cyborgs.Kevin Warwick - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (1):159-181.
    In this paper we consider the creative realisation of new beings — namely, cyborgs. These can be brought about in a number of ways, and several versions are discussed. A key feature is merging biological and technological sections into an overall living operational whole. A practical look is taken at how the use of implant and electrode technology can be employed to open up new paths between humans/animals and technology, especially linking the brain directly with external entities. Actual experimentation in (...)
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    Le Rôle de la Communication Dans l'Adoption d'Une Technologie Innovante.André Delaforge & Nicolas Moinet - 2008 - Hermes 50:157.
    L'adoption d'une technologie innovante ne s'explique pas simplement par l'adéquation d'une offre à une demande. À partir de l'analyse de la trajectoire de la technologie RFID est posée l'hypothèse qu'il n'existe pas d'innovation réussie sans co-construction de connaissances partagées par l'ensemble des acteurs intéressés au sein d'un espace public. Travailler sur l'innovation nécessite donc de parcourir cette chaîne qui transforme l'information en connaissances par un processus complexe de communication.The adoption of innovative technology can not be explained simply by the (...)
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  25. Quattro matrimoni e un funerale: problemi etici nel futuro dell’interfaccia cervello-computer.Kevin Warwick & Cinzia Battistella - 2007 - Teoria 27 (2):19-26.
    In this paper we take a look at four different types of practical technical connection linking humans and/or animals with technology – four weddings. Each, in its own way, proffers up ethical issues that really need to be considered and dealt with now. In the first two cases we talk about the RFID implants and the robots. In the latter two cases the implants link the human brain and computers directly together and in doing so also raise questions regarding (...)
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