Results for 'RNA world'

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  1. Mitochondrial Uncoupling Proteins Regulate Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Expression: Crosstalk Between Cellular and Endocrine Metabolic Regulators Suggested by RNA Interference and Genetic Studies.Sukhbir S. Dhamrait, Cecilia Maubaret, Ulrik Pedersen-Bjergaard, David J. Brull, Peter Gohlke, John R. Payne, Michael World, Birger Thorsteinsson, Steve E. Humphries & Hugh E. Montgomery - 2016 - Bioessays 38:S107-S118.
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  2.  23
    Are RNA Viruses Vestiges of an RNA World?Susie Fisher - 2010 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (1):121-141.
    This paper follows the circuitous path of theories concerning the origins of viruses from the early years of the twentieth century until the present, considering RNA viruses in particular. I focus on three periods during which new understandings of the nature of viruses guided the construction and reconstruction of origin hypotheses. During the first part of the twentieth century, viruses were mostly viewed from within the framework of bacteriology and the discussion of origin centered on the “degenerative” or the “retrograde (...)
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  3.  6
    Getting From an RNA World to Modern Cells Just Got a Little Easier.Anthony M. Poole - 2006 - Bioessays 28 (2):105-108.
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  4.  6
    Ideas in Theoretical Biology Preservation of Relics From the RNA World Through Natural Selection, Symbiosis and Horizontal Gene Transfer.Julian Chela-Flores - 1996 - Acta Biotheoretica 44 (2):169-177.
  5. Specific Labeling: An Effective Tool to Explore the RNA World.Yu Liu, Rui Sousa & Yun-Xing Wang - 2016 - Bioessays 38 (2):192-200.
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  6.  57
    An Interpretive Review of the Origin of Life Research.David Penny - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):633-671.
    Life appears to be a natural property of matter, but the problem of its origin only arose after early scientists refuted continuous spontaneous generation. There is no chance of life arising ‘all at once’, we need the standard scientific incremental explanation with large numbers of small steps, an approach used in both physical and evolutionary sciences. The necessity for considering both theoretical and experimental approaches is emphasized. After describing basic principles that are available (including the Darwin-Eigen cycle), the search for (...)
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  7.  3
    Introns First.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (3):196-203.
    Knowing how introns originated should greatly enhance our understanding of the information we carry in our DNA. Gilbert’s suggestion that introns initially arose to facilitate recombination still stands, though not for the reason he gave. Reanney’s alternative, that evolution, from the early “RNA world” to today’s DNA-based world, would require the ability to detect and correct errors by recombination, now seems more likely. Consistent with this, introns are richer than exons in the potential to extrude the stem-loop structures (...)
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  8.  5
    On the Semio-Mathematical Nature of Codes.Yair Neuman & Ophir Nave - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (1):99-111.
    The relational structure of RNA, DNA, and protein bears an interesting similarity to the determination problem in category theory. In this paper, we present this deep-structure similarity and use it as a springboard for discussing some abstract properties of coding in various systems. These abstract properties, in turn, may shed light on the evolution of the DNA world from a semiotic perspective. According to the perspective adopted in this paper, living systems are not information processing systems but “meaning-making” systems. (...)
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  9.  71
    Are the Different Hypotheses on the Emergence of Life as Different as They Seem?Iris Fry - 1995 - Biology and Philosophy 10 (4):389-417.
    This paper calls attention to a philosophical presupposition, coined here the continuity thesis which underlies and unites the different, often conflicting, hypotheses in the origin of life field. This presupposition, a necessary condition for any scientific investigation of the origin of life problem, has two components. First, it contends that there is no unbridgeable gap between inorganic matter and life. Second, it regards the emergence of life as a highly probable process. Examining several current origin-of-life theories. I indicate the implicit (...)
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  10.  9
    Directed Evolution: A Historical Exploration Into an Evolutionary Experimental System of Nanobiotechnology, 1965–2006. [REVIEW]Eun-Sung Kim - 2008 - Minerva 46 (4):463-484.
    This study explores the history of nanotechnology from the perspective of protein engineering, which differs from the history of nanotechnology that has arisen from mechanical and materials engineering; it also demonstrates points of convergence between the two. Focusing on directed evolution—an experimental system of molecular biomimetics that mimics nature as an inspiration for material design—this study follows the emergence of an evolutionary experimental system from the 1960s to the present, by detailing the material culture, practices, and techniques involved. Directed evolution, (...)
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  11.  11
    How the Discovery of Ribozymes Cast RNA in the Roles of Both Chicken and Egg in Origin-of-Life Theories.Neeraja Sankaran - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (4):741-750.
    Scientific theories about the origin-of-life theories have historically been characterized by the chicken-and-egg problem of which essential aspect of life was the first to appear, replication or self-sustenance. By the 1950s the question was cast in molecular terms and DNA and proteins had come to represent the carriers of the two functions. Meanwhile, RNA, the other nucleic acid, had played a capricious role in origin theories. Because it contained building blocks very similar to DNA, biologists recognized early that RNA could (...)
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  12.  14
    Sorry, Darwin: Chemistry Never Made the Transition to Biology.Bhakti Niskama Shanta - 2011 - Science and Scientist (scienceandscientist.org/biology) and Darwin Under Siege (scienceandscientist.org/Darwin).
    The term biology is of Greek origin meaning the study of life. On the other hand, chemistry is the science of matter, which deals with matter and its properties, structure, composition, behavior, reactions, interactions and the changes it undergoes. The theory of abiogenesis maintains that chemistry made a transition to biology in a primordial soup. To keep the naturalistic ‘inanimate molecules to human life’ evolution ideology intact, scientists must assemble billions of links to bridge the gap between the inanimate chemicals (...)
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  13.  2
    Molecular Biologists, Biochemists, and Messenger RNA: The Birth of a Scientific Network. [REVIEW]Jean-Paul Gaudillière - 1996 - Journal of the History of Biology 29 (3):417 - 445.
    This paper investigated the part played by collaborative practices in chaneling the work of prominent biochemists into the development of molecular biology. The RNA collaborative network that emerged in the 1960s in France encompassed a continuum of activities that linked laboratories to policy-making centers. New institutional frameworks such as the DGRST committees were instrumental in establishing new patterns of funding, and in offering arenas for multidisciplinary debates and boundary assessment. It should be stressed however, that although this collaborative network was (...)
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  14.  17
    Rethinking Quasispecies Theory: From Fittest Type to Cooperative Consortia.Luis Villarreal & Guenther Witzany - 2013 - World Journal of Biological Chemistry 4:79-90.
    Recent investigations surprisingly indicate that single RNA "stem-loops" operate solely by chemical laws that act without selective forces, and in contrast, self-ligated consortia of RNA stem-loops operate by biological selection. To understand consortial RNA selection, the concept of single quasi-species and its mutant spectra as drivers of RNA variation and evolution is rethought here. Instead, we evaluate the current RNA world scenario in which consortia of cooperating RNA stem-loops are the basic players. We thus redefine quasispecies as RNA quasispecies (...)
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  15.  18
    Evolution in Biological and Non-Biological Systems: The Origins of Life.Isaac Salazar-Ciudad - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (1):26-37.
    A replicator is simply something that makes copies of itself. There are hypothetical replicators (e.g., self-catalyzing chemical cycles) that are suspected to be unable to exhibit heritable variation. Variation in any of their constituent molecules would not lead them to produce offspring with those new variant molecules. Copying, such as in DNA replication or in xerox machines, allows any sequence to be remade and then sequence variations to be inherited. This distinction has been used against non-RNA-world hypotheses: without RNA (...)
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  16.  10
    Archives or Palimpsests? Bacterial Genomes Unveil a Scenario for the Origin of Life.Antoine Danchin - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (1):52-61.
    The three processes needed to create life, compartmentalization, metabolism, and information transfer (memory stored in nucleic acids and manipulation operated by proteins) are embedded in organized genome features. The core of life puts together growth and maintenance (which drives survival), while life in context explores and exploits specific niches. Analysis of gene persistence in a large number of genomes shows that the former constitutes the paleome, which recapitulates the three phases of the origin of life: metabolism of small molecules on (...)
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  17. The Origin of Life II: How Did It Begin?Paul Davies - manuscript
    The problem of how a mixture of chemicals can spontaneously transform themselves into even a simple living organism remains one of the great outstanding challenges to science. Various primordial soup theories have been proposed in which chemical self- organization brings about the required level of complexity. Major conceptual obstacles remain, however, such as the emergence of the genetic code, and the “chicken-and-egg” problem concerning which came first: nucleic acids or proteins. Currently fashionable is the so-called RNA world theory, which (...)
     
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  18.  6
    Self-Organizing Dynamics of a Minimal Protocell.Walter Riofrio - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:185-191.
    In this paper, we present an argument showing why the general properties of a self-organizing system (e.g. being far from equilibrium) may be too weak to characterize biological and proto-biological systems. The special character of biological systems, tell us that its distinctive capacities could have been developed in pre-biotic times. In other words, the basic properties of life would be better comprehended if we think that they were much more likely early in time. We developed a conceptual proposal on the (...)
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  19. Mind and World.John McDowell - 1994 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    Much as we would like to conceive empirical thought as rationally grounded in experience, pitfalls await anyone who tries to articulate this position, and ...
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  20.  16
    Us Irbs Confronting Research in the Developing World.Robert L. Klitzman - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (2):63-73.
    Increasingly, US-sponsored research is carried out in developing countries, but how US Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) approach the challenges they then face is unclear.METHODS: I conducted in-depth interviews of about 2 hours each, with 46 IRB chairs, directors, administrators and members. I contacted the leadership of 60 IRBs in the United States (US) (every fourth one in the list of the top 240 institutions by National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding), and interviewed IRB leaders from 34 (55%).RESULTS: US IRBs face (...)
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  21.  33
    The End of the World After the End of Finitude: On a Recently Prominent Speculative Tone in Philosophy.Jussi Backman - 2017 - In Marcia Cavalcante Schuback & Susanna Lindberg (eds.), The End of the World: Contemporary Philosophy and Art. London: Rowman and Littlefield International. pp. 105-123.
    The chapter studies the speculative realist critique of the notion of finitude and its implications for the theme of the "end of the world" as a teleological and eschatological idea. It is first explained how Quentin Meillassoux proposes to overcome both Kantian and Heideggerian "correlationist" approaches with his speculative thesis of absolute contingency. It is then shown that Meillassoux's speculative materialism also dismantles the close link forged by Kant between the teleological ends of human existence and a teleological notion (...)
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  22.  56
    Against Permitted Exploitation in Developing World Research Agreements.Danielle M. Wenner - 2016 - Developing World Bioethics 16 (1):36-44.
    This paper examines the moral force of exploitation in developing world research agreements. Taking for granted that some clinical research which is conducted in the developing world but funded by developed world sponsors is exploitative, it asks whether a third party would be morally justified in enforcing limits on research agreements in order to ensure more fair and less exploitative outcomes. This question is particularly relevant when such exploitative transactions are entered into voluntarily by all relevant parties, (...)
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  23.  10
    Clinical Trials and Scid Row: The Ethics of Phase 1 Trials in the Developing World.Jonathan Kimmelman - 2007 - Developing World Bioethics 7 (3):128–135.
    ABSTRACTRelatively little has been written about the ethics of conducting early phase clinical trials involving subjects from the developing world. Below, I analyze ethical issues surrounding one of gene transfer’s most widely praised studies conducted to date: in this study, Italian investigators recruited two subjects from the developing world who were ineligible for standard of care because of economic considerations. Though the study seems to have rendered a cure in these two subjects, it does not appear to have (...)
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  24.  12
    The Reporting of Irb Review in Journal Articles Presenting Hiv Research Conducted in the Developing World.Robert L. Klitzman, Kelly Kleinert, Hoda Rifai-Bashjawish & L. E. U. Shiung - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):161-169.
    Objectives: We investigated how often journal articles reporting on human HIV research in four developing world countries mention any institutional review boards (IRBs) or research ethics committees (RECs), and what factors are involved.Methods: We examined all such articles published in 2007 from India, Nigeria, Thailand and Uganda, and coded these for several ethical and other characteristics.Results: Of 221 articles meeting inclusion criteria, 32.1% did not mention IRB approval. Mention of IRB approval was associated with: biomedical (versus psychosocial) research (P (...)
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  25.  2
    Systemic Negligence: Why It Is Morally Important for Developing World Bioethics.Chhanda Chakraborti - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):208-213.
    In the context of clinical and non-clinical biomedical practices, negligence is usually understood as a lapse of a specific professional duty by a healthcare worker or by a medical facility. This paper tries to delineate systemic negligence as another kind of negligence in the context of health systems, particularly in developing countries, that needs to be recognized and addressed. Systemic negligence is not just a mere collection of stray incidences of medical errors and system failures in a health system, but (...)
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  26. Real World Justice.Thomas Pogge - 2004 - Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):29-53.
    Despite a high and growing global average income, billions of human beings are still condemned to lifelong severe poverty with all its attendant evils of low life expectancy, social exclusion, ill health, illiteracy, dependency, and effective enslavement. We citizens of the rich countries are conditioned to think of this problem as an occasion for assistance. Thanks in part to the rationalizations dispensed by our economists, most of us do not realize how deeply we are implicated, through the new global economic (...)
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  27.  90
    Consciousness and the World.Brian O'Shaughnessy - 2000 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Brian O'Shaughnessy puts forward a bold and original theory of consciousness, one of the most fascinating but puzzling aspects of human existence. He analyses consciousness into purely psychological constituents, according pre-eminence to its epistemological power; the result is an integrated picture of the conscious mind in its natural physical setting. Consciousness and the World is a rich and exciting book, a major contribution to our understanding of the mind.
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  28. Being There: Putting Brain, Body, and World Together Again.Andy Clark - 1997 - MIT Press.
    In treating cognition as problem solving, Andy Clark suggests, we may often abstract too far from the very body and world in which our brains evolved to guide...
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  29.  70
    Zwart and Franssen's Impossibility Theorem Holds for Possible-World-Accounts but Not for Consequence-Accounts to Verisimilitude.Gerhard Schurz & Paul Weingartner - 2010 - Synthese 172 (3):415 - 436.
    Zwart and Franssen’s impossibility theorem reveals a conflict between the possible-world-based content-definition and the possible-world-based likeness-definition of verisimilitude. In Sect. 2 we show that the possible-world-based content-definition violates four basic intuitions of Popper’s consequence-based content-account to verisimilitude, and therefore cannot be said to be in the spirit of Popper’s account, although this is the opinion of some prominent authors. In Sect. 3 we argue that in consequence-accounts , content-aspects and likeness-aspects of verisimilitude are not in conflict with (...)
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  30.  14
    The Development of Non-Coding RNA Ontology.Jingshan Huang, Karen Eilbeck, Barry Smith, Judith Blake, Deijing Dou, Weili Huang, Darren Natale, Alan Ruttenberg, Jun Huan, Michael Zimmermann, Guoqian Jiang, Yu Lin, Bin Wu, Harrison Strachan, Nisansa de Silva & Mohan Vamsi Kasukurthi - 2016 - International Journal of Data Mining and Bioinformatics 15 (3):214--232.
    Identification of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has been significantly improved over the past decade. On the other hand, semantic annotation of ncRNA data is facing critical challenges due to the lack of a comprehensive ontology to serve as common data elements and data exchange standards in the field. We developed the Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO) to handle this situation. By providing a formally defined ncRNA controlled vocabulary, the NCRO aims to fill a specific and highly needed niche in semantic annotation of (...)
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  31. Kant and Cosmopolitanism: The Philosophical Ideal of World Citizenship.Pauline Kleingeld - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive account of Kant’s cosmopolitanism, highlighting its moral, political, legal, economic, cultural, and psychological aspects. Contrasting Kant’s views with those of his German contemporaries, and relating them to current debates, Pauline Kleingeld sheds new light on texts that have been hitherto neglected or underestimated. In clear and carefully argued discussions, she shows that Kant’s philosophical cosmopolitanism underwent a radical transformation in the mid 1790s and that the resulting theory is philosophically stronger than is usually thought. Using (...)
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  32.  87
    Self and World.Quassim Cassam - 1997 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Self and World is an exploration of the nature of self-awareness. Quassim Cassam challenges the widespread and influential view that we cannot be introspectively aware of ourselves as objects in the world. In opposition to the views of many empiricist and idealistic philosophers, including Hume, Kant and Wittgenstein, he argues that the self is not systematically elusive from the perspective of self-consciousness, and that consciousness of our thoughts and experiences requires a sense of our thinking, experiencing selves as (...)
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  33. On Considering a Possible World as Actual.Robert Stalnaker - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (75):141-156.
    [Robert Stalnaker] Saul Kripke made a convincing case that there are necessary truths that are knowable only a posteriori as well as contingent truths that are knowable a priori. A number of philosophers have used a two-dimensional model semantic apparatus to represent and clarify the phenomena that Kripke pointed to. According to this analysis, statements have truth-conditions in two different ways depending on whether one considers a possible world 'as actual' or 'as counterfactual' in determining the truth-value of the (...)
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  34.  40
    The “Relation” Between Science and Religion in the Pluralistic Landscape of Today's World.Zainal Abidin Bagir - 2015 - Zygon 50 (2):403-417.
    The attempt to expand the discourse of science and religion by considering the pluralistic landscape of today's world requires not only adding new voices from more religious traditions but a rethinking of the basic categories of the discourse, that is, “science,” “religion,” and the notion that the main issue to be investigated is the relationship between the two. Making use of historical studies of science and religion discourse and a case study from Indonesia, this article suggests a rethinking of (...)
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  35. Creating a Better World: Towards the University of Wisdom.Nicholas Maxwell - 2011 - In Ronald Barnett (ed.), The Future University: Ideas and Possibilities. Routledge.
    Universities need to change dramatically in order to help humanity make progress towards as good a world as possible.
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  36. Reclaiming Third World Feminism: Or Why Transnational Feminism Needs Third World Feminism.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2014 - Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 12 (1).
    Third World and transnational feminisms have emerged in opposition to white second-wave feminists’ single-pronged analyses of gender oppression that elided Third World women’s multiple and complex oppressions in their various social locations. Consequently, these feminisms share two “Third World feminist” mandates: First, feminist analyses of Third World women’s oppression and resistance should be historically situated; and second, Third World women’s agency and voices should be respected. Despite these shared mandates, they have diverged in their proper (...)
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  37. The Poetic Experience of the World.Mathew Abbott - 2010 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (4):493-516.
    In this article I develop Heidegger's phenomenology of poetry, showing that it may provide grounds for rejecting claims that he lapses into linguistic idealism. Proceeding via an analysis of the three concepts of language operative in the philosopher's work, I demonstrate how poetic language challenges language's designative and world-disclosive functions. The experience with poetic language, which disrupts Dasein's absorption by emerging out of equipmentality in the mode of the broken tool, brings Dasein to wonder at the world's existence (...)
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  38.  9
    The Non-Coding RNA Ontology : A Comprehensive Resource for the Unification of Non-Coding RNA Biology.Huang Jingshan, Eilbeck Karen, Barry Smith, A. Blake Judith, Dou Dejing, Huang Weili, A. Natale Darren, Ruttenberg Alan, Huan Jun & T. Zimmermann Michael - 2016 - Journal of Biomedical Semantics 7 (1).
    In recent years, sequencing technologies have enabled the identification of a wide range of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Unfortunately, annotation and integration of ncRNA data has lagged behind their identification. Given the large quantity of information being obtained in this area, there emerges an urgent need to integrate what is being discovered by a broad range of relevant communities. To this end, the Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO) is being developed to provide a systematically structured and precisely defined controlled vocabulary for the (...)
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  39.  35
    Propagating Organization: An Enquiry.Kauffman Stuart, K. Logan Robert, Este Robert, Goebel Randy, Hobill David & Shmulevich Ilya - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):27-45.
    Our aim in this article is to attempt to discuss propagating organization of process, a poorly articulated union of matter, energy, work, constraints and that vexed concept, “information”, which unite in far from equilibrium living physical systems. Our hope is to stimulate discussions by philosophers of biology and biologists to further clarify the concepts we discuss here. We place our discussion in the broad context of a “general biology”, properties that might well be found in life anywhere in the cosmos, (...)
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  40. Self, World and Space: The Meaning and Mechanisms of Ego- and Allocentric Spatial Representation. [REVIEW]Rick Grush - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (1):59-92.
    b>: The problem of how physical systems, such as brains, come to represent themselves as subjects in an objective world is addressed. I develop an account of the requirements for this ability that draws on and refines work in a philosophical tradition that runs from Kant through Peter Strawson to Gareth Evans. The basic idea is that the ability to represent oneself as a subject in a world whose existence is independent of oneself involves the ability to represent (...)
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  41.  32
    Experimentum Scholae: The World Once More … But Not (Yet) Finished.Jan Masschelein - 2011 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):529-535.
    Inspired by Hannah Arendt, this contribution offers an exercise of thought as an attempt to distil anew the original spirit of what education means. It tries to articulate the event or happening that the word names, the experiences in which this happening manifests itself and the (material) forms that constitute it or make it find/take (its) place. Starting from the meaning of scholè as ‘free time’ or ‘undestined and unfinished time’ it further explores scholè as the time of attention which (...)
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  42. How to Read Moore's "Proof of an External World".Kevin Morris & Consuelo Preti - 2015 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 4 (1).
    We develop a reading of Moore’s “Proof of an External World” that emphasizes the connections between this paper and Moore’s earlier concerns and strategies. Our reading has the benefit of explaining why the claims that Moore advances in “Proof of an External World” would have been of interest to him, and avoids attributing to him arguments that are either trivial or wildly unsuccessful. Part of the evidence for our view comes from unpublished drafts which, we believe, contain important (...)
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  43. Is Logic in the Mind or in the World?Gila Sher - 2011 - Synthese 181 (2):353 - 365.
    The paper presents an outline of a unified answer to five questions concerning logic: (1) Is logic in the mind or in the world? (2) Does logic need a foundation? What is the main obstacle to a foundation for logic? Can it be overcome? (3) How does logic work? What does logical form represent? Are logical constants referential? (4) Is there a criterion of logicality? (5) What is the relation between logic and mathematics?
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  44. An Argument for External World Skepticism From the Appearance/Reality Distinction.Moti Mizrahi - 2016 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 6 (4):368-383.
    In this paper, I argue that arguments from skeptical hypotheses for external world skepticism derive their support from a skeptical argument from the distinction between appearance and reality. This skeptical argument from the appearance/reality distinction gives the external world skeptic her conclusion without appealing to skeptical hypotheses and without assuming that knowledge is closed under known entailments. If this is correct, then this skeptical argument from the appearance/reality distinction poses a new skeptical challenge that cannot be resolved by (...)
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  45.  5
    The PIWI‐Interacting RNA Molecular Pathway: Insights From Cultured Silkworm Germline Cells.Kazuhiro Sakakibara & Mikiko C. Siomi - forthcoming - Bioessays.
    The PIWI-interacting RNA pathway, one of the major eukaryotic small RNA silencing pathways, is a genome surveillance system that silences selfish genes in animal gonads. piRNAs guide PIWI protein to target genes through Watson–Crick RNA–RNA base-parings. Loss of piRNA function causes genome instability, inducing failure in gametogenesis and infertility. Studies using fruit flies and mice as key experimental models have resulted in tremendous progress in understanding the mechanism underlying the piRNA pathway. Recent work using cultured silkworm germline cells has also (...)
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  46.  5
    Free Associations Mirroring Self- and World-Related Concepts: Implications for Personal Construct Theory, Psycholinguistics and Philosophical Psychology.Martin Kuška, Radek Trnka, Aleš A. Kuběna & Jiří Růžička - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology (7):art.n. 981, 1-13.
    People construe reality by using words as basic units of meaningful categorization. The present theory-driven study applied the method of a free association task to explore how people express the concepts of the world and the self in words. The respondents were asked to recall any five words relating with the word world. Afterwards they were asked to recall any five words relating with the word self. The method of free association provided the respondents with absolute freedom to (...)
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  47. How Can Our Human World Exist and Best Flourish Embedded in the Physical Universe? A Letter to an Applicant to a New Liberal Studies Course.Nicholas Maxwell - 2014 - On the Horizon 22 (1).
    In this paper I sketch a liberal studies course designed to explore our fundamental problem of thought and life: How can our human world exist and best flourish embedded as it is in the physical universe? The fundamental character of this problem provides one with the opportunity to explore a wide range of issues. What does physics tell us about the universe and ourselves? How do we account for everything physics leaves out? How can living brains be conscious? If (...)
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  48.  82
    The Phenomenological Life-World Analysis and the Methodology of the Social Sciences.Thomas Eberle - 2010 - Human Studies 33 (2-3):123-139.
    This Alfred Schutz Memorial Lecture discusses the relationship between the phenomenological life-world analysis and the methodology of the social sciences, which was the central motive of Schutz’s work. I have set two major goals in this lecture. The first is to scrutinize the postulate of adequacy, as this postulate is the most crucial of Schutz’s methodological postulates. Max Weber devised the postulate ‘adequacy of meaning’ in analogy to the postulate of ‘causal adequacy’ (a concept used in jurisprudence) and regarded (...)
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  49.  32
    The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction.John Leslie - 1996 - Routledge.
    Are we in imminent danger of extinction? Yes, we probably are, argues John Leslie in his chilling account of the dangers facing the human race as we approach the second millenium. The End of the World is a sobering assessment of the many disasters that scientists have predicted and speculated on as leading to apocalypse. In the first comprehensive survey, potential catastrophes - ranging from deadly diseases to high-energy physics experiments - are explored to help us understand the risks. (...)
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  50. Leibniz and the Necessity of the Best Possible World.Martin Pickup - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (3):507-523.
    (2014). Leibniz and the Necessity of the Best Possible World. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 92, No. 3, pp. 507-523. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2014.889724.
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