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Rachael Wiseman
University of Liverpool
  1.  9
    Metaphysical Animals: How Four Women Brought Philosophy Back to Life.Clare Mac Cumhaill & Rachael Wiseman - 2022 - London, UK: Chatto and Windus.
    'Philosophy in a world of women. I reflected, talking with Mary, Pip and Elizabeth, how much I love them.' Two brilliant young scholars uncover the major philosophical contributions of four women whose ideas could have changed the course of twentieth-century thought. Written with energy, expertise and panache, The Quartet is a page-turning blend of research and recovery, storytelling, and a call to arms. Iris Murdoch, Philippa Foot, Mary Midgley and Elizabeth Anscombe were great friends and comrades in the intellectual trenches, (...)
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  2. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Anscombe’s Intention.Rachael Wiseman - 2016 - Routledge.
    G. E. M. Anscombe’s Intention is a classic of twentieth-century philosophy. The work has been enormously influential despite being a dense and largely misunderstood text. It is a standard reference point for anyone engaging with philosophy of action and philosophy of psychology. In this Routledge Philosophy GuideBook, Rachael Wiseman: situates _Intention_ in relation to Anscombe’s moral philosophy and philosophy of mind considers the influence of Aquinas, Aristotle, Frege, and Wittgenstein on the method and content of _Intention_ adopts a structure for (...)
     
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  3. What Am I and What Am I Doing?Rachael Wiseman - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy 114 (10):536-550.
    There is a deep connection between Anscombe’s argument that ‘I’ is not a referring expression and Intention’s account of practical knowledge and knowledge without observation. The assumption that the so-called “no-reference thesis” can be resisted while the account of action set out in her book INTENTION is embraced is based on a misunderstanding of the argument of “The First Person” and the status of its conclusion; removing that misunderstanding helps to illuminate the concept of practical knowledge and brings into view (...)
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  4.  21
    Anscombe on Brute Facts and Human Affairs.Rachael Wiseman - 2020 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 87:85-99.
    In ‘Modern Moral Philosophy’ Anscombe writes: ‘It is not profitable at present for us to do moral philosophy. It should be laid aside at any rate until we have an adequate philosophy of psychology, in which we are conspicuously lacking’. In consideration of this Anscombe appeals to the relation of ‘brute-relative-to’ which holds between facts and descriptions of human affairs. This paper describes the reorientation in philosophy of action that this relation aims to effect and examines the claim that this (...)
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  5.  15
    What If the Private Linguist Were a Poet? Iris Murdoch on Privacy and Ethics.Rachael Wiseman - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):224-234.
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  6. Assertion: New Philosophical Essays. Edited by Jessica Brown and Herman Cappelen. [REVIEW]Rachael Wiseman - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):832-835.
    The Philosophical Quarterly, Volume 63, Issue 253, Page 832-835, October 2013.
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  7.  55
    The Misidentification of Immunity to Error Through Misidentification.Rachael Wiseman - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy 116 (12):663-677.
    Sidney Shoemaker credits Wittgenstein’s Blue Book with identifying a special kind of immunity to error that is characteristic of ‘I’ in its “use as subject”. This immunity to error is thought by Shoemaker, and by many following him, to be central to the meaning of ‘I’ and thus to the topics of self-knowledge, self-consciousness and personal memory. This paper argues that Wittgenstein’s work does not contain the thesis, nor any version of the thesis, that there is a use of ‘I’—‘use (...)
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  8.  41
    No Morality, No Self: Anscombe’s Radical Skepticism, Written by James Doyle. [REVIEW]Rachael Wiseman - 2019 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 9 (4):357-363.
  9.  83
    The Intended and Unintended Consequences of Intention.Rachael Wiseman - forthcoming - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
    This paper examines the context in which Anscombe wrote Intention—focusing on the years 1956–1958. At this time Anscombe was engaged in a number of battles against her university, her colleagues, and, ultimately, “the spirit of the age,” which included her public opposition to Oxford University’s decision to award Harry Truman an honorary degree. Intention, I show, must be understood as a product of the explicitly ethical and political debates in which Anscombe was involved. Understanding the intention with which she wrote (...)
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  10.  13
    IV—Wittgenstein, Anscombe and the Need for Metaphysical Thinking.Rachael Wiseman - 2022 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 122 (2):71-95.
    Metaphysicians are in the business of making and defending modal claims—claims about how things must, or could or could not be. Wittgenstein’s opposition to necessity claims, along with his various negative remarks about ‘metaphysical’ uses of language, makes it seem almost a truism that Wittgenstein was opposed to metaphysics. In this paper I want to make a case for rejecting that apparent truism. My thesis is that it is illuminating to characterize what Wittgenstein and Anscombe are doing in their philosophical (...)
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  11.  4
    Midgley, Mary. What Is Philosophy For? London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018. Pp. 232. $68.00 ; $22.95. [REVIEW]Rachael Wiseman - 2019 - Ethics 130 (2):277-284.
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  12. Sensation and the Grammar of Life: Anscombe’s Procedure and Her Purpose.Clare Mac Cumhaill & Rachael Wiseman - forthcoming - In Heather Logue and Louise Richardson (ed.), Purpose and Procedure in Philosophy of Perception.
    Anscombe’s published writings, lectures and notes on sensation point toward a sophisticated critique of sense-data, representationalist and direct realist theories of perception (in both their historical and contemporary forms), and a novel analysis of the concept of sensation. Her philosophy of perception begins with the traditional question, ‘What are the objects of sensation?’, but the response is a grammatical rather than ontological enquiry. What, she asks, are the characteristics of the grammatical object of sensation verbs? Anscombe’s answer is: sensation verbs (...)
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  13.  57
    Assertion: New Philosophical Essays. [REVIEW]Rachael Wiseman - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):832-835.
    © 2013 The Editors of The Philosophical QuarterlyEach of the essays brought together in this volume by Brown and Cappelen is of a high standard. Each, in its own right, makes a novel contribution to one or other of the book's central topics: the nature of assertion and the epistemic norm of assertion. So there is much for philosophers of language and epistemologists to engage with in this volume.In their introduction, the editors set out the collection's two aims: first, ‘to (...)
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  14.  42
    Private Objects and the Myth of the Given.Rachael Wiseman - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (1):175-189.
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  15.  27
    Book Review of Wittgenstein on Thought and Will by Roger Teichmann. [REVIEW]Rachael Wiseman - 2017 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 6 (2):91-95.
    Review of Teichmann, Roger, _Wittgenstein on Thought and Will_. New York/Oxford: Routledge, 2015. 180 pages.
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  16.  10
    Portraits of Integrity: 26 Case Studies From History, Literature and Philosophy.Amber Carpenter & Rachael Wiseman (eds.) - 2020 - Bloomsbury Publishing.
    Portraits of Integrity depicts more than 20 historical, fictional and contemporary figures whose character or life raises questions about what integrity is and how it is perceived. Integrity might be culturally bound, but this diverse set of portraits demonstrates that it is not the special preserve of any one culture. Portraits of Socrates, Mencius, Rama and Job, alongside the aspirational 16th-century couple John and Dorothy Kaye, civil rights activist Ella Baker and an anonymous banker, highlight the persisting – sometimes conflicting (...)
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  17. Interrupting the Conversation: Donald MacKinnon, Wartime Tutor of Anscombe, Midgley, Murdoch and Foot.Clare Mac Cumhaill & Rachael Wiseman - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy of Education.
    Elizabeth Anscombe, Mary Midgley, Iris Murdoch and Philippa Foot all studied at Oxford University during World War Two. One of their wartime tutors was Donald MacKinnon. This paper gives a broad overview of MacKinnon’s philosophical outlook as it was developing at this time. Four talks from between 1938 and 1941 – ‘And the Son of Man That Thou Visiteth Him’ (1938), ‘What Is a Metaphysical Statement?’ (1940), ‘The Function of Philosophy in Education’ (1941) and ‘Revelation and Social Justice’ (1941) – (...)
     
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  18. The Importance of Murdoch's Early Encounters with Anscombe and Marcel.Clare Mac Cumhaill & Rachael Wiseman - forthcoming - In Silvia Panizza & Mark Hopwood (eds.), The Murdochian Mind.
    In his reference letter for Murdoch’s 1947 fellowship application at Newnham College, Cambridge, her erstwhile Oxford undergraduate tutor, Donald MacKinnon, remarks that Murdoch is ‘on the threshold of creative work of a high order’. This chapter outlines the nature of that ‘creative work’ and its early development. We show how Murdoch’s close study of the Christian existentialist philosopher and playwright Gabriel Marcel (1883–1973) came to inflect both her early critique of Jean Paul Sartre’s existentialism and her first attempts to show (...)
     
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  19.  23
    The Anscombean Mind.Adrian Haddock & Rachael Wiseman (eds.) - 2021 - Routledge.
    "G. E. M. Anscombe is one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century. Known primarily for influencing research in action theory and moral philosophy, her work also has relevance in the study of metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, philosophy of religion, and politics. The Anscombian Mind provides a comprehensive survey of Anscombe's thought, not only placing it in its historical context but also exploring its enduring significance in contemporary debates. Divided into three clear parts, 24 chapters (...)
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  20.  18
    Anscombe's Intention: A Review of Anton Ford, Jennifer Hornsby and Frederick Stoutland , Essays on Anscombe's 'Intention'[REVIEW]Rachael Wiseman - 2015 - Jurisprudence 6 (1):182-193.