Results for 'Rachel Dixon'

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  1.  23
    What difference does income make for Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) members in California? Comparing lower-income and higher-income households.Julia Soelen Kim, Rachel Surls, Natasha Simpson, Kate Munden-Dixon, Cindy Fake, Libby Christensen, Katharine Bradley & Ryan Galt - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (2):435-452.
    In the U.S. there has been considerable interest in connecting low-income households to alternative food networks like Community Supported Agriculture. To learn more about this possibility we conducted a statewide survey of CSA members in California. A total of 1149 members from 41 CSAs responded. Here we answer the research question: How do CSA members’ socioeconomic and demographic backgrounds, household conditions potentially interfering with membership, and CSA membership experiences vary between lower-income households and higher-income households? We divided members into LIHHs (...)
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  2.  51
    Brief report time course of attentional bias for threat scenes: Testing the vigilance‐avoidance hypothesis.Karin Mogg, Brendan Bradley, Felicity Miles & Rachel Dixon - 2004 - Cognition and Emotion 18 (5):689-700.
  3. Darwinism and Human Dignity.Ben Dixon - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (1):23 - 42.
    James Rachels argued against the possibility of finding some moral capacity in humans that confers upon them a unique dignity. His argument contends that Darwinism challenges such attempts, because Darwinism predicts that any morally valuable capacity able to bestow a unique dignity is likely present to a degree within both humans and non-human animals alike. I make the case, however, that some of Darwin's own thoughts regarding the nature of conscience provide a springboard for criticising Rachels's claim here. Using Darwin's (...)
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  4.  96
    Kant's Rationalist Aesthetics.Rachel Zuckert - 2007 - Kant Studien 98 (4):443-463.
    It is quite standard, even banal, to describe Kant's project in the Critique of Pure Reason [KrV] as a critical reconciliation of rationalism and empiricism, most directly expressed in Kant's claim that intuitions and concepts are two distinct, yet equally necessary, and necessarily interdependent sources of cognition. Similarly, though Kant rejects both the rationalist foundation of morality in the concept of perfection and that of the empiricists in feeling or in the moral sense, one might broadly characterize Kant's moral philosophy (...)
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  5.  60
    Is There Kantian Art Criticism?Rachel Zuckert - 2013 - In Stefano Bacin, Alfredo Ferrarin, Claudio La Rocca & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Kant und die Philosophie in weltbürgerlicher Absicht. Akten des XI. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Boston: de Gruyter. pp. 343-356.
    Kant’s theory of taste might suggest that there cannot be any legitimate, useful art criticism, which guides others’ art appreciation: on the Kantian view, each of us must judge for him- or herself, autonomously, not follow the judgments of others; and no empirical concepts, or empirical knowledge, is supposed to be relevant for making a judgment of taste. Thus, it would seem, we should not follow others who have superior knowledge of art, because they have such knowledge. Despite these elements (...)
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  6.  36
    Herder's Naturalist Aesthetics.Rachel Zuckert - 2019 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Rachel Zuckert provides the first overarching account of Johann Gottfried Herder's complex aesthetic theory. She guides the reader through Herder's texts, showing how they relate to eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European philosophy of art, and focusing on two main concepts: aesthetic naturalism, the view that art is natural to and naturally valuable for human beings as organic, embodied beings, and - unusually for Herder's time - aesthetic pluralism, the view that aesthetic value takes many diverse and culturally (...)
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  7.  61
    Studies A, B, and C merger.Rachel A. Ankeny, James Ladyman & Darrell Rowbottom - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
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  8.  26
    Episodic elaboration: Investigating the structure of retrieved past events and imagined future events.Rachel J. Anderson, Lien Peters & Stephen A. Dewhurst - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:112-124.
  9. Leslie on Generics.Rachel Katharine Sterken - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (9):2493-2512.
    This paper offers three objections to Leslie’s recent and already influential theory of generics :375–403, 2007a, Philos Rev 117:1–47, 2008): her proposed metaphysical truth-conditions are subject to systematic counter-examples, the proposed disquotational semantics fails, and there is evidence that generics do not express cognitively primitive generalisations.
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  10.  17
    Book Forum.Rachel A. Ankeny - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 84:101330.
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  11.  39
    Canadian Figure Skaters, French Judges, and Realism in Sport.Nicholas Dixon - 2003 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (2):103-116.
  12.  69
    Adaptive Naturalism in Herder’s Aesthetics.Rachel Zuckert - 2015 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 36 (2):269-293.
    I discuss an apparent tension between two aspects of Johann Gottfried Herder’s aesthetic theory: his emphasis on and endorsement of art’s cultural embeddedness and historical variation, and his reliance on natural norms of artistic value. I propose that Herder’s essay, “Shakespeare,” suggests a possible resolution to this tension, a position I call “adaptive naturalism.” On this view, aesthetic value comprises a work’s capacity to promote the exercise of human natural capacities in harmony with the (natural or social) environment. Thus such (...)
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  13.  64
    Lying to Insurance Companies: The Desire to Deceive among Physicians and the Public.Rachel M. Werner, G. Caleb Alexander, Angela Fagerlin & Peter A. Ubel - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):53-59.
    This study examines the public's and physicians' willingness to support deception of insurance companies in order to obtain necessary healthcare services and how this support varies based on perceptions of physicians' time pressures. Based on surveys of 700 prospective jurors and 1617 physicians, the public was more than twice as likely as physicians to sanction deception (26% versus 11%) and half as likely to believe that physicians have adequate time to appeal coverage decisions (22% versus 59%). The odds of public (...)
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  14.  34
    On private events and brain events.Norman F. Dixon - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):29-30.
  15.  83
    Generics, Covert Structure and Logical Form.Rachel Katharine Sterken - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (5):503-529.
    The standard view amongst philosophers of language and linguists is that the logical form of generics is quantificational and contains a covert, unpronounced quantifier expression Gen. Recently, some theorists have begun to question the standard view and rekindle the competing proposal, that generics are a species of kind-predication. These theorists offer some forceful objections to the standard view, and new strategies for dealing with the abundance of linguistic evidence in favour of the standard view. I respond to these objections and (...)
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  16.  27
    Regulation and the social licence for medical research.Mary Dixon-Woods & Richard E. Ashcroft - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):381-391.
    Regulation and governance of medical research is frequently criticised by researchers. In this paper, we draw on Everett Hughes’ concepts of professional licence and professional mandate, and on contemporary sociological theory on risk regulation, to explain the emergence of research governance and the kinds of criticism it receives. We offer explanations for researcher criticism of the rules and practices of research governance, suggesting that these are perceived as interference in their mandate. We argue that, in spite of their complaints, researchers (...)
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  17.  28
    The Role of Defaultness in Affecting Pleasure: The Optimal Innovation Hypothesis Revisited.Rachel Giora, Shir Givoni, Vered Heruti & Ofer Fein - 2017 - Metaphor and Symbol 32 (1):1-18.
    The Optimal Innovation Hypothesis, following from the Graded Salience Hypothesis, is being reviewed and revisited. The attempt is to expand the notion of Optimal Innovation to allow it to apply to both stimuli’s coded meanings as well as their noncoded, constructed interpretations. According to the Optimal Innovation Hypothesis, Optimal Innovations, when devised, will be more pleasing than nonoptimally innovative counterparts. Unlike such competitors, Optimal Innovations deautomatize familiar coded alternatives, which invoke unconditional responses alongside novel but distinct ones, allowing both responses (...)
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  18. Beyond prejudice: Are negative evaluations the problem and is getting us to like one another more the solution?John Dixon, Mark Levine, Steve Reicher, Kevin Durrheim, Dominic Abrams, Mark Alicke, Michal Bilewicz, Rupert Brown, Eric P. Charles & John Drury - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):411-425.
    For most of the history of prejudice research, negativity has been treated as its emotional and cognitive signature, a conception that continues to dominate work on the topic. By this definition, prejudice occurs when we dislike or derogate members of other groups. Recent research, however, has highlighted the need for a more nuanced and “inclusive” (Eagly 2004) perspective on the role of intergroup emotions and beliefs in sustaining discrimination. On the one hand, several independent lines of research have shown that (...)
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  19.  14
    Boundaries of reasoning in cases: The visual psychoanalysis of René Spitz.Rachel Weitzenkorn - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (3-4):66-84.
    This article argues that the foundational separation between psychoanalysis and experimental psychology was challenged in important ways by psychoanalytic infant researchers. Through a close examination of American psychoanalyst René Spitz, it extends John Forrester’s conception of reasoning in cases outside classic psychoanalytic practices. Specifically, the article interrogates the foundations of reasoning in cases—the individual, language, and the doctor–patient relationship—to show how these are reimagined in relation to the structures of American developmental psychology. The article argues that the staunch separation of (...)
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  20.  78
    Where’s the problem? Considering Laing and Esterson’s account of schizophrenia, social models of disability, and extended mental disorder.Rachel Cooper - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (4):295-305.
    In this article, I compare and evaluate R. D. Laing and A. Esterson’s account of schizophrenia as developed in Sanity, Madness and the Family, social models of disability, and accounts of extended mental disorder. These accounts claim that some putative disorders should not be thought of as reflecting biological or psychological dysfunction within the afflicted individual, but instead as external problems. In this article, I consider the grounds on which such claims might be supported. I argue that problems should not (...)
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  21.  57
    Why is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders so hard to revise? Path-dependence and “lock-in” in classification.Rachel Cooper - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 51:1-10.
  22.  25
    What can data trusts for health research learn from participatory governance in biobanks?Richard Milne, Annie Sorbie & Mary Dixon-Woods - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    New models of data governance for health data are a focus of growing interest in an era of challenge to the social licence. In this article, we reflect on what the data trust model, which is founded on principles of participatory governance, can learn from experiences of involving and engagement of members of the public and participants in the governance of large-scale biobanks. We distinguish between upstream and ongoing governance models, showing how they require careful design and operation if they (...)
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  23. Risk, doubt, and transmission.Rachel Elizabeth Fraser - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (10):2803-2821.
    Despite their substantial appeal, closure principles have fallen on hard times. Both anti-luck conditions on knowledge and the defeasibility of knowledge look to be in tension with natural ways of articulating single-premise closure principles. The project of this paper is to show that plausible theses in the epistemology of testimony face problems structurally identical to those faced by closure principles. First I show how Lasonen-Aarnio’s claim that there is a tension between single premise closure and anti-luck constraints on knowledge can (...)
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  24.  65
    Learning to see food justice.Beth A. Dixon - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):175-184.
    Ethical perception involves seeing what is ethically salient about the particular details of the world. This kind of seeing is like informed judgment. It can be shaped by what we know and what we come to learn about, and by the development of moral virtue. I argue here that we can learn to see food justice, and I describe some ways to do so using three narrative case studies. The mechanism for acquiring this kind of vision is a “food justice (...)
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  25.  91
    Sport, Parental Autonomy, and Children’s Right to an Open Future.Nicholas Dixon - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (2):147-159.
  26.  49
    Reference and Form.Rachel Goodman - forthcoming - In Alex Grzankowski & Anthony Savile (eds.), Thought: its Origin and Reach. Essays in Honour of Mark Sainsbury. Routledge.
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  27.  13
    “It's Like a Kick in the Teeth”: The Emergence of Novel Predictors of Burnout in Frontline Workers During Covid-19.Rachel C. Sumner & Elaine L. Kinsella - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The context of Covid-19 has offered an unusual cultural landscape for examining how workers view their own position relative to others, and how individuals respond to prolonged exposure to workplace stress across different sectors and cultures. Through our recent work tracking the well-being of frontline workers in the UK and Ireland, we have uncovered additional psychological factors that have not been accounted for in previous models of occupational stress or burnout. In recent months, frontline workers have worked to protect the (...)
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  28.  21
    Reconsidering euripides' Bellerophon.Dustin W. Dixon - 2014 - Classical Quarterly 64 (2):493-506.
    No consensus has been reached about the reconstruction of Euripides' fragmentary tragedyBellerophon, but two suggestions have not received the serious attention they deserve. The first is that Stheneboea is a character in the play, and the second that Euripides does not depict Bellerophon as an atheist or an impious hero. In this paper, I shall reconsider both of these suggestions. In fact, the addition of Stheneboea to thedramatis personaeallows us to correct the second problem, as I shall propose that Stheneboea, (...)
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  29.  12
    Sociological Theory: Pretence and Possibility.Keith Dixon - 1975 - Philosophical Review 84 (3):435-437.
  30. Visible and informational persistence in iconic memory.P. Dixon & V. Dilollo - 1987 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):350-350.
     
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  31. Wells versus Kipling.James Main Dixon - 1921 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 2 (2):97.
  32. Traditions, trends, and innovations.D. L. Horton & T. R. Dixon - 1968 - In T. Dixon & Deryck Horton (eds.), Verbal Behavior and General Behavior Theory. Prentice-Hall. pp. 572--581.
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  33.  20
    Patterns of Joint Improvisation in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.Rachel-Shlomit Brezis, Lior Noy, Tali Alony, Rachel Gotlieb, Rachel Cohen, Yulia Golland & Nava Levit-Binnun - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  34. Dragging and Sweeping: Queer Temporalities of Care for Historical Debris.Rachel Silverbloom - 2023 - Diacritics 51 (2):84-106.
    This essay argues that we need practices for tending to what has been discarded as "historical debris" in order to generate queer socialities and meanings that refuse the dominant heteronormative, capitalist, and white supremacist privileging of futurity, novelty, and productivity. Artist and city planner Theaster Gates's transformative work takes root in Chicago's South Side, where he has renovated abandoned buildings into dynamic community spaces for celebrating and generating Black history, art, and culture. The essay reads Gates's artistic-activist practice through Elizabeth (...)
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  35.  2
    Badly Needed Distinctions and Departures from Duality in Cancel Wars a Review of Cancel Wars by Sigal Ben Porath.Rachel Wahl - forthcoming - Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-5.
  36. The social forms and functions of bioethics in the United Kingdom.Richard E. Ashcroft & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2011 - In Catherine Myser (ed.), Bioethics Around the Globe. Oxford University Press.
     
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  37.  12
    Business Ethics on the Internet: 2.N. Ben Fairweather & Steve Dixon - 1998 - Business Ethics 7 (2):73-80.
  38.  10
    Intellectual Border Crossings.Janet Dixon Keller & Alison D. Goebel - 2007 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 35 (2):129-129.
  39.  17
    A Logical Statement of Grammatical Theory as Contained in Halliday's `Categories of the Theory of Grammar.'Linguistic Science and Logic.J. F. Staal & Robert M. W. Dixon - 1966 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 31 (4):668.
  40.  3
    A procedure for adaptive control of the interaction between acoustic classification and linguistic decoding in automatic recognition of continuous speech.C. C. Tappert & N. R. Dixon - 1974 - Artificial Intelligence 5 (2):95-113.
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  41.  33
    Sensation: A relativist's view.W. Dixon Ward - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):208-209.
  42.  13
    Economics and the act.David Wilson & William Dixon - 2004 - Social Epistemology 18 (1):71 – 84.
  43.  11
    Ethics and education research.Rachel Brooks - 2014 - Los Angeles: SAGE. Edited by Kitty Te Riele & Meg Maguire.
    Drawn from the authors' experiences in the UK, Australia and mainland Europe and with contributions from across the globe, this clear and accessible book includes a wide range of examples. The authors show the reader how to: identify ethical issues which may arise with any research project, gain informed consent, provide information in the right way to participants, and present and disseminate findings in line with ethical guidelines.
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  44.  19
    Structural Deprioritization and Stigmatization of Mental Health Concerns in the Educational Setting.Rachel C. Conrad & Rebecca Weintraub Brendel - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (10):67-69.
    Volume 20, Issue 10, October 2020, Page 67-69.
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  45.  37
    First Do No Harm?: What Role Should Considerations of Potential Harm Play in Revising the DSM?Rachel Cooper - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):103-113.
    Guidelines for revisions to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition asked those proposing certain types of revision to consider potential harms to patients. Specifically, those proposing new diagnoses were to consider whether ‘the harm that arises from the adoption of the proposed diagnosis exceed[s] the benefit that would accrue to affected individuals’, and potential for harm was cited as a possible reason for keeping a diagnosis in the appendix rather than promoting it to the main classification. The (...)
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  46. "Hands Tied: a roundtable on Maria Lassnig and Ayesha Hameed" (5th edition).Rachel Aumiller, Sam Dolbear, Nadine El-Enany, Amelia Groom, Clio Nicastro, Anja Sunhyun Michaelsen & M. Ty - 2021 - Another Gaze: A Journal for Film and Feminism 5:34-42.
    'Hands Tied' brings together two very different films about hands: Maria Lassnig's Palmistry (1973) and Ayesha Hameed's A Rough History (of the Destruction of Fingerprints) (2016). These works are contextualised and their scope extended further by a roundtable discussion featuring participants Rachel Aumiller, Sam Dolbear, Nadine El-Enany, Amelia Groom, Clio Nicastro, Anja Sunhyun Michaelsen, and M. Ty., who discuss their relation to fate, work, pleasure, touch, and surveillance.
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  47.  46
    A cultural economy model for studying food systems.Jane Dixon - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):151-160.
    In 1984, William Friedland proposed a Commodity Systems Analysis framework for describing the stages through which a commodity is transformed and how it acquires value. He challenged us to think of commodities as entities with a social as well as a physical presence. Friedland's argument enriched the concept of commodity production, but it remains essentially a supply side perspective.Since then, many commentators have argued that power is shifting from producers to consumers. Furthermore, some are claiming that, contrary to much traditional (...)
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  48.  17
    Reflective Writing about Near-Peer Blogs: A Novel Method for Introducing the Medical Humanities in Premedical Education.Rachel Conrad Bracken, Ajay Major, Aleena Paul & Kirsten Ostherr - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (4):535-569.
    Narrative analysis, creative writing, and interactive reflective writing have been identified as valuable for professional identity formation and resilience among medical and premedical students alike. This study proposes that medical student blogs are novel pedagogical tools for fostering peer-to-peer learning in academic medicine and are currently underutilized as a near-peer resource for premedical students to learn about the medical profession. To evaluate the pedagogical utility of medical student blogs for introducing core themes in the medical humanities, the authors conducted qualitative (...)
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  49.  26
    Differential use of sensory information in sexual behavior as a function of gender.Rachel S. Herz & Elizabeth D. Cahill - 1997 - Human Nature 8 (3):275-286.
  50.  28
    Development and Relationships Between Phonological Awareness, Morphological Awareness and Word Reading in Spoken and Standard Arabic.Rachel Schiff & Elinor Saiegh-Haddad - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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