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  1.  30
    Selective Reduction: “A Soft Cover for Hard Choices” or Another Name for Abortion?Radhika Rao - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (2):196-205.
    Selective reduction and abortion both involve the termination of fetal life, but they are classified by different designations to underscore the notion that they are regarded as fundamentally different medical procedures: the two are performed using distinct techniques by different types of physicians, upon women under very different circumstances, in order to further dramatically different objectives. Hence, the two procedures appear to call for a distinct moral calculus, and they have traditionally evoked contradictory reactions from society. This essay posits that (...)
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  2.  37
    Genes and Spleens: Property, Contract, or Privacy Rights in the Human Body?Radhika Rao - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (3):371-382.
    This article compares three frameworks for legal regulation of the human body. Property law systematically favors those who use the body to create commercial products. Yet contract and privacy rights cannot compete with the property paradigm, which alone affords a complete bundle of rights enforceable against the whole world. In the face of researchers' property rights, the theoretical freedom to contract and the meager interest in privacy leave those who supply body parts vulnerable to exploitation.
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    Genes and Spleens: Property, Contract, or Privacy Rights in the Human Body?Radhika Rao - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (3):371-382.
  4.  9
    Informed Consent, Body Property, and Self-Sovereignty.Radhika Rao - 2016 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 44 (3):437-444.
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  5. The Opportunity Gap: Achievement and Inequality in Education.Carol DeShano da Silva, James Philip Huguley, Zenub Kakli & Radhika Rao (eds.) - 2007 - Harvard Educational Review.
    _The Opportunity Gap_ aims to shift attention from the current overwhelming emphasis on schools in discussions of the achievement gap to more fundamental questions about social and educational opportunity. The achievement gap looms large in the current era of high-stakes testing and accountability. Yet questions persist: Has the accountability movement—and attendant discussions on the achievement gap—focused attention on the true sources of educational failure in American schools? Do we need to look beyond classrooms and schools for credible accounts of disparities (...)
     
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