9 found
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  1. Attitudes Towards Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Comparison Between Psychiatrists and Other Physicians.Tal Bergman Levy, Shlomi Azar, Ronen Huberfeld, Andrew M. Siegel & Rael D. Strous - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (7):402-408.
    Euthanasia and physician assisted-suicide are terms used to describe the process in which a doctor of a sick or disabled individual engages in an activity which directly or indirectly leads to their death. This behavior is engaged by the healthcare provider based on their humanistic desire to end suffering and pain. The psychiatrist's involvement may be requested in several distinct situations including evaluation of patient capacity when an appeal for euthanasia is requested on grounds of terminal somatic illness or when (...)
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  2.  6
    Second Thoughts About Who is First: The Medical Triage of Violent Perpetrators and Their Victims.Azgad Gold & Rael D. Strous - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (5):293-300.
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  3.  5
    Second Call for Second Thoughts: A Response to Ardagh and Wicclair.Azgad Gold & Rael D. Strous - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (5):305-306.
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  4. Postmortem Brain Donation and Organ Transplantation in Schizophrenia: What About Patient Consent?: Figure 1.Rael D. Strous, Tal Bergman-Levy & Benjamin Greenberg - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (7):442-444.
    In patients with schizophrenia, consent postmortem for organ donation for transplantation and research is usually obtained from relatives. By means of a questionnaire, the authors investigate whether patients with schizophrenia would agree to family members making such decisions for them as well as compare decisions regarding postmortem organ transplantation and brain donation between patients and significant family members. Study results indicate while most patients would not agree to transplantation or brain donation for research, a proportion would agree. Among patients who (...)
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    Ethics and Research in the Service of Asylum Seekers.Rael D. Strous & Alan Jotkowitz - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):63-65.
  6.  7
    Response to a Neuroskeptic: Neuroscientific Endeavor Versus Clinical Boundary Violation.Rael D. Strous - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (2):24-26.
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  7.  1
    ‘Witness in White’ Medical Ethics Learning Tours on Medicine During the Nazi Era.Matthew A. Fox & Rael D. Strous - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-107001.
    During the Nazi era, physicians provided expertise and a veneer of legitimacy enabling crimes against humanity. In a creative educational initiative to address current ethical dilemmas in clinical medicine, we conduct ethics learning missions bringing senior physicians to relevant Nazi era sites in either Germany or Poland. The tours share a core curriculum contextualising history and medical ethics, with variations in emphasis. Tours to Germany provide an understanding of the theoretical origins of the ethical violations and crimes of Nazi physicians. (...)
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    Ethics of Sharing Medical Knowledge with the Community: Is the Physician Responsible for Medical Outreach During a Pandemic?Rael D. Strous & Tami Karni - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):732-735.
    A recent update to the Geneva Declaration’s ‘Physician Pledge’ involves the ethical requirement of physicians to share medical knowledge for the benefit of patients and healthcare. With the spread of COVID-19, pockets exist in every country with different viral expressions. In the Chareidi religious community, for example, rates of COVID-19 transmission and dissemination are above average compared with other communities within the same countries. While viral spread in densely populated communities is common during pandemics, several reasons have been suggested to (...)
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    Looking to the Future From the Past: Take Home Lessons From Japanese World War II Medical Atrocities.Rael D. Strous & Ari Z. Zivotofsky - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (6):59-61.