Results for 'Ranald Clouston'

11 found
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  1.  8
    Mental Deficiency (Amentia).T. S. Clouston - 1914 - The Eugenics Review 6 (2):168.
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  2.  6
    Nature and Nurture in Mental Development.T. Clouston - 1915 - The Eugenics Review 6 (4):323.
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  3.  8
    Scotland: The Later Middle Ages. Ranald Nicholson.Donald Sutherland - 1977 - Speculum 52 (3):721-722.
  4.  43
    The Student Lifeworld and the Meanings of Plagiarism.Peter Ashworth, Ranald MacDonald & Madeleine Freewood - 2003 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 34 (2):257-278.
    As plagiarism is a notion specific to a particular culture and epoch, and is also understood in a variety of ways by individuals, particular attention must be paid to the putting of the phenomenological question, What is plagiarism in its appearing? Resolution of this issue leads us to locate students' perceptions and opinions within the lifeworld, and to seek an initially idiographic set of descriptions. Of twelve interview analyses, three are presented. A student who took an especially anxious line, his (...)
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  5.  18
    Probing “Pop-Out”: Another Look at the Face-in-the-Crowd Effect.Carol Hampton, Dean G. Purcell, Louis Bersine, Christine H. Hansen & Ranald D. Hansen - 1989 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (6):563-566.
  6.  2
    Engaging with Historical Source Work: Practices, Pedagogy, Dialogue.Charles Anderson, Kate Day, Ranald Michie & David Rollason - 2006 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 5 (3):243-263.
    Although primary source work is a major component of undergraduate history degrees in many countries, the topic of how best to support this work has been relatively unexplored. This article addresses the pedagogical support of primary source work by reviewing relevant literature to identify the challenges undergraduates face in interpreting sources, and examining how in two courses carefully articulated course design and supportive teaching activities assisted students to meet these challenges. This fine-grained examination of the courses is framed within a (...)
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  7.  27
    Base Rates and Randomness.Ranald R. Macdonald - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):778-778.
    In base rate problems the estimated probability must equal the base rate only where random sampling is assumed. Otherwise there is uncertainty over and above that which can be included in any probability model and inductive inference is involved. Subjects should use base rates to the extent that the problem suggests a simple random sampling model.
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  8.  17
    Edward I and the Throne of Scotland, 1290–1296: An Edition of the Record Sources for the Great Cause. I: Introduction. II: Texts. [REVIEW]Ranald Nicholson - 1980 - Speculum 55 (4):839-841.
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  9.  9
    The Anglo-Norman Era in Scottish History. G. W. S. Barrow.Ranald Nicholson - 1982 - Speculum 57 (4):855-857.
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  10.  16
    The Limits of Probability Modelling: A Serendipitous Tale of Goldfish, Transfinite Numbers, and Pieces of String. [REVIEW]Ranald R. Macdonald - 2000 - Mind and Society 1 (2):17-38.
    This paper is about the differences between probabilities and beliefs and why reasoning should not always conform to probability laws. Probability is defined in terms of urn models from which probability laws can be derived. This means that probabilities are expressed in rational numbers, they suppose the existence of veridical representations and, when viewed as parts of a probability model, they are determined by a restricted set of variables. Moreover, probabilities are subjective, in that they apply to classes of events (...)
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  11.  3
    Kingship and Unity: Scotland 1000–1306.Ranald Nicholson - 1983 - Speculum 58 (1):145-146.
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