13 found
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  1. Attitudes Towards Business Ethics: A Five Nation Comparative Study. [REVIEW]Randi L. Sims & A. Ercan Gegez - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 50 (3):253-265.
    Increasingly the business environment is tending toward a global economy. The current study compares the results of the Attitudes Towards Business Ethics Questionnaire (ATBEQ) reported in the literature for samples from the United States of America, Israel, Western Australia, and South Africa to a new sample (n = 125) from Turkey. The results indicate that while there are some shared views towards business ethics across countries, significant differences do exist between Turkey and each of the other countries in the study. (...)
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  2.  51
    Predictors of External Whistleblowing: Organizational and Intrapersonal Variables. [REVIEW]Randi L. Sims & John P. Keenan - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (4):411-421.
    Research on whistleblowing has not yet provided a finite set of variables which have been shown to influence an employee's decision to report wrongdoing. Prior research on business ethics suggests that ethical business decisions are influenced by both organizational as well as intrapersonal variables. As such, this paper attempts to predict the decision to whistleblow using organizational and intrapersonal variables. External whistleblowing was found to be significantly related to supervisor support, informal policies, gender, and ideal values. External whistleblowing was not (...)
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  3.  57
    Determinants of Ethical Decision Making: The Relationship of the Perceived Organizational Environment. [REVIEW]Randi L. Sims & Thomas L. Keon - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 19 (4):393 - 401.
    This study attempts to help explain the ethical decision making of individual employees by determining how the perceived organizational environment is related to that decision. A self- administered questionnaire design was used for gathering data in this study with a sample size of 245 full-time employees. Perceived supervisor expectation, formal policies, and informal policies were used to assess the expressed ethical decision of the respondents. The findings indicate that the perceived organizational environment is significantly related to the ethical decision of (...)
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  4.  59
    The Influence of Ethical Fit on Employee Satisfaction, Commitment and Turnover.Randi L. Sims & K. Galen Kroeck - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (12):939 - 947.
    This study examines the influence of ethical fit on employee attitudes and intentions to turnover. The results of this investigation provides support for the conjecture that ethical work climate is an important variable in the study of person-organization fit. Ethical fit was found to be significantly related to turnover intentions, continuance commitment, and affective commitment, but not to job satisfaction. Results are discussed in regard to some of the affective and cognitive distinctions among satisfaction, commitment, and behavioral intentions.
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  5.  57
    Ethical Work Climate as a Factor in the Development of Person-Organization Fit.Randi L. Sims & Thomas L. Keon - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (11):1095-1105.
    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between the ethical climate of the organization and the development of person-organization fit. The relationship between an individual's stage of moral development and his/her perceived ethical work environment was examined using a sample of 86 working students. Results indicate that a match between individual preferences and present position proved most satisfying. Subjects expressing a match between their preferences for an ethical work climate and their present ethical work (...)
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  6.  40
    The Influence of Organizational Expectations on Ethical Decision Making Conflict.Randi L. Sims & Thomas L. Keon - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):219 - 228.
    This study considers the ethical decision making of individual employees and the influence their perception of organizational expectations has on employee feelings about the decision making process. A self-administered questionnaire design was used for gathering data in this study, with a sample size of 245 full-time employees. The match between the ethical alternative chosen by the respondent and that alternative perceived to be encouraged by his/her organization was found to be significantly related to both feelings of discomfort and feelings of (...)
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  7.  24
    Ethical Rule Breaking by Employees: A Test of Social Bonding Theory. [REVIEW]Randi L. Sims - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 40 (2):101 - 109.
    As employees continue to lie, cheat, and steal from their employers, researchers have tried to help managers understand and possibly predict such deviant behavior. This study considers the specific employee misconduct of ethical rule breaking. Hirschi (1969) suggested that deviant behavior can be better understood by social bonding theory. The social bonding model includes four elements; attachment, commitment, involvement, and belief. It is proposed that Hirschi's social bonding theory can be used to understand ethical rule breaking by employees. Using a (...)
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  8.  7
    Teaching Business Ethics: A Case Study of an Ethics Across the Curriculum Policy.Randi L. Sims - 2000 - Teaching Business Ethics 4 (4):437-443.
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  9.  33
    A Study of Deviance as a Retaliatory Response to Organizational Power.Randi L. Sims - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):553-563.
    In a time when ethical scandals are commonplace in the media, one begins to wonder just what organizations are doing wrong. This article analyzes the Fall 2006 boardroom spying scandal at Hewlett–Packard to determine whether the workplace deviance observed can be linked to a retaliatory response to organizational power. A summary of the events leading up to, during, and the fall-out of the scandal is reported.
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  10.  19
    Support for the Use of Deception Within the Work Environment: A Comparison of Israeli and United States Employee Attitudes. [REVIEW]Randi L. Sims - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (1):27 - 34.
    As businesses become more global, the opportunities for employees to work with individuals from different cultures increase. Research in cross-cultural interactions has increased in response to such changes. This research study considers employee attitudes and perceived organizational support for the use of deception within the work environment. In this study, two types of deception have been considered; deception for personal gain and deception for the organization's benefit. The reported likelihood for committing these two types of deception for United States and (...)
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  11.  12
    Ethical Decision Making: A Cross-Cultural Comparison.Randi L. Sims - 1996 - International Journal of Value-Based Management 9 (1):77-88.
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  12.  7
    The Effectiveness of a Plagiarism Prevention Policy: A Longitudinal Study of Student Views.Randi L. Sims - 2002 - Teaching Business Ethics 6 (4):477-482.
  13.  7
    Antecedents and Consequences of Collective Fraud.Randi L. Sims - 2013 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 32 (3-4):145-182.
    This paper examines the collective fraudulent behaviors taking place during the residential real estate bubble in the United States from 2002 to 2006 and the influence of others’ choices on decision making leading to a herd mentality. The antecedents of collective fraud are discussed in terms of the sociological theory behind human herding and the fraudulent behaviors during the real estate bubble are examined. Using archival witness testimony as a primary basis for analysis, this paper argues that without widespread collective (...)
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