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Ray Jackendoff [67]Ray S. Jackendoff [10]
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  1. Consciousness and the Computational Mind.RAY JACKENDOFF - 1987 - MIT Press.
  2. Semantic Interpretation in Generative Grammar.Ray Jackendoff - 1972 - Cambridge: Mass., Mit Press.
  3. Semantic Structures.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1990 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Semantic Structures is a large-scale study of conceptual structure and its lexical and syntactic expression in English that builds on the theory of Conceptual...
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  4. Semantics And Cognition.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1983 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    This book emphasizes the role of semantics as a bridge between the theory of language and the theories of other cognitive capacities such as visual perception...
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  5. A Generative Theory of Tonal Music.Fred Lerdahl & Ray Jackendoff - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (1):94-98.
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  6. The Faculty of Language: What's Special About It?Ray Jackendoff & Steven Pinker - 2005 - Cognition 95 (2):201-236.
    We examine the question of which aspects of language are uniquely human and uniquely linguistic in light of recent suggestions by Hauser, Chomsky, and Fitch that the only such aspect is syntactic recursion, the rest of language being either specific to humans but not to language (e.g. words and concepts) or not specific to humans (e.g. speech perception). We find the hypothesis problematic. It ignores the many aspects of grammar that are not recursive, such as phonology, morphology, case, agreement, and (...)
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  7. Patterns in the Mind: Language and Human Nature.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1994 - New York: Basic Books.
  8.  51
    “What” and “Where” in Spatial Language and Spatial Cognition.Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):217-238.
    Fundamental to spatial knowledge in all species are the representations underlying object recognition, object search, and navigation through space. But what sets humans apart from other species is our ability to express spatial experience through language. This target article explores the language ofobjectsandplaces, asking what geometric properties are preserved in the representations underlying object nouns and spatial prepositions in English. Evidence from these two aspects of language suggests there are significant differences in the geometric richness with which objects and places (...)
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  9.  28
    On Beyond Zebra: The Relation of Linguistic and Visual Information.Ray Jackendoff - 1987 - Cognition 26 (2):89-114.
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  10. The Nature of the Language Faculty and its Implications for Evolution of Language (Reply to Fitch, Hauser, and Chomsky).Ray Jackendoff - 2005 - Cognition 97 (2):211-225.
    In a continuation of the conversation with Fitch, Chomsky, and Hauser on the evolution of language, we examine their defense of the claim that the uniquely human, language-specific part of the language faculty (the “narrow language faculty”) consists only of recursion, and that this part cannot be considered an adaptation to communication. We argue that their characterization of the narrow language faculty is problematic for many reasons, including its dichotomization of cognitive capacities into those that are utterly unique and those (...)
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  11.  89
    Parts and Boundaries.Ray Jackendoff - 1992 - In Beth Levin & Steven Pinker (eds.), Lexical & Conceptual Semantics. Blackwell. pp. 9-45.
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  12. Possible Stages in the Evolution of the Language Capacity.Ray Jackendoff - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (7):272-279.
  13. How Language Helps Us Think.Ray Jackendoff - 1996 - Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):1-34.
    On formal and empirical grounds, the overt form of language cannot be the vehicle that the mind uses for reasoning. Nevertheless, we most frequently experience our thought as "inner speech". It is argued that inner speech aids thought by providing a "handle " for attention, making it possible to pay attention to relational and abstract aspects of thought, and thereby to process them with greater richness. Organisms lacking language have no modality of experience that provides comparable articulation of thought; hence (...)
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  14. A User's Guide to Thought and Meaning.Ray Jackendoff - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    A profoundly arresting integration of the faculties of the mind - of how we think, speak, and see the world. Written with an informality that belies the originality of its insights and the radical nature of its conclusions this is the author's most important book since his groundbreaking Foundations of Language in 2002.
     
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  15.  42
    The Capacity for Music: What is It, and What’s Special About It?Ray Jackendoff & Fred Lerdahl - 2006 - Cognition 100 (1):33-72.
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  16. What is a Concept, That a Person May Grasp It?Ray Jackendoff - 1989 - Mind and Language 4 (1-2):68-102.
  17. What is the Human Language Faculty? Two Views.Ray Jackendoff - unknown
    In addition to providing an account of the empirical facts of language, a theory that aspires to account for language as a biologically based human faculty should seek a graceful integration of linguistic phenomena with what is known about other human cognitive capacities and about the character of brain computation. The present article compares the theoretical stance of biolinguistics (Chomsky 2005, Di Sciullo and Boeckx 2011) with a constraint-based Parallel Architecture approach to the language faculty (Jackendoff 2002, Culicover and Jackendoff (...)
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  18.  18
    How Language Helps Us Think.Ray Jackendoff - 1996 - Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):1-34.
    On formal and empirical grounds, the overt form of language cannot be the vehicle that the mind uses for reasoning. Nevertheless, we most frequently experience our thought as "inner speech". It is argued that inner speech aids thought by providing a "handle " for attention, making it possible to pay attention to relational and abstract aspects of thought, and thereby to process them with greater richness. Organisms lacking language have no modality of experience that provides comparable articulation of thought; hence (...)
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  19.  52
    A Parallel Architecture Perspective on Language Processing.Ray Jackendoff - unknown
    Article history: This article sketches the Parallel Architecture, an approach to the structure of grammar that Accepted 29 August 2006 contrasts with mainstream generative grammar (MGG) in that (a) it treats phonology, Available online 13 October 2006 syntax, and semantics as independent generative components whose structures are linked by interface rules; (b) it uses a parallel constraint-based formalism that is nondirectional; (c) Keywords: it treats words and rules alike as pieces of linguistic structure stored in long-term memory.
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  20.  23
    Whence and Whither in Spatial Language and Spatial Cognition?Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):255-265.
  21.  66
    Linguistics in Cognitive Science: The State of the Art.Ray Jackendoff - manuscript
  22. Précis of Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution,.Ray Jackendoff - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):651-665.
    The goal of this study is to reintegrate the theory of generative grammar into the cognitive sciences. Generative grammar was right to focus on the child's acquisition of language as its central problem, leading to the hypothesis of an innate Universal Grammar. However, generative grammar was mistaken in assuming that the syntactic component is the sole course of combinatoriality, and that everything else is “interpretive.” The proper approach is a parallel architecture, in which phonology, syntax, and semantics are autonomous generative (...)
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  23.  20
    Multiword Constructions in the Grammar.Peter W. Culicover, Ray Jackendoff & Jenny Audring - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (3):552-568.
    There is ample evidence that speakers’ linguistic knowledge extends well beyond what can be described in terms of rules of compositional interpretation stated over combinations of single words. We explore a range of multiword constructions to get a handle both on the extent of the phenomenon and on the grammatical constraints that may govern it. We consider idioms of various sorts, collocations, compounds, light verbs, syntactic nuts, and assorted other constructions, as well as morphology. Our conclusion is that MWCs highlight (...)
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  24.  34
    Quantitative Methods Alone Are Not Enough: Response to Gibson and Fedorenko.Peter W. Culicover & Ray Jackendoff - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (6):234-235.
  25.  71
    The Reality of a Universal Language Faculty.Steven Pinker & Ray Jackendoff - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):465-466.
    While endorsing Evans & Levinson's (E&L's) call for rigorous documentation of variation, we defend the idea of Universal Grammar as a toolkit of language acquisition mechanisms. The authors exaggerate diversity by ignoring the space of conceivable but nonexistent languages, trivializing major design universals, conflating quantitative with qualitative variation, and assuming that the utility of a linguistic feature suffices to explain how children acquire it.
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  26.  11
    How Language Helps Us Think.Ray Jackendoff - 1995 - Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):1-34.
    On formal and empirical grounds, the overt form of language cannot be the vehicle that the mind uses for reasoning. Nevertheless, we most frequently experience our thought as "inner speech". It is argued that inner speech aids thought by providing a "handle " for attention, making it possible to pay attention to relational and abstract aspects of thought, and thereby to process them with greater richness. Organisms lacking language have no modality of experience that provides comparable articulation of thought; hence (...)
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  27.  2
    The Capacity for Music: What is It, and What’s Special About It?Fred Lerdahl & Ray Jackendoff - 2006 - Cognition 100 (1):33-72.
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  28. Conceptual Semantics.Ray Jackendoff - manuscript
    The approach can be characterized at two somewhat independent levels. The first is the overall framework for the theory of meaning, and how this framework is integrated into linguistics, philosophy of language, and cognitive science (section 1). The second is the formal machinery that has been developed to achieve the goals of this framework (sections 2 and 3). The general framework might be realized in terms of other formal approaches, and many aspects of the formal machinery can empirically motivated within (...)
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  29.  4
    Number 1 Regular Articles Isabelle Peretz (University of Montreal) the Nature of Music From a Biological Perspective, 1–32. [REVIEW]Ray Jackendoff, Fred Lerdahl, W. Tecumseh Fitch, Moises Betancort, Manuel Carreiras & Carlos Acun A.-Farin - 2006 - Cognition 100 (1):545-547.
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  30.  89
    Your Theory of Language Evolution Depends on Your Theory of Language.Ray Jackendoff - unknown
    language to explain, and I want to show how this depends on what you think language is. So, what is language? Everybody recognizes that language is partly culturally dependent: there is a huge variety of disparate languages in the world, passed down through cultural transmission. If that’s all there is to language, a theory of the evolution of language has nothing at all to explain. We need only explain the cultural evolution of languages: English, Dutch, Mandarin, Hausa, etc. are products (...)
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  31.  17
    Reading Time Evidence for Enriched Composition.Brian McElree, Matthew J. Traxler, Martin J. Pickering, Rachel E. Seely & Ray Jackendoff - 2001 - Cognition 78 (1):B17-B25.
  32. The Problem of Reality.Ray Jackendoff - 1991 - Noûs 25 (4):411-33.
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  33.  2
    In Defense of Theory.Ray Jackendoff - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41:185-212.
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  34.  10
    Morphology and Memory: Toward an Integrated Theory.Ray Jackendoff & Jenny Audring - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (1):170-196.
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  35.  76
    Conceptual Semantics and Cognitive Linguistics.Ray Jackendoff - 1996 - Cognitive Linguistics 7 (1):93-129.
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  36.  42
    The English Resultative As a Family of Constructions.Ray Jackendoff - unknown
    English resultative expressions have been a major focus of research on the syntax-semantics interface. We argue in this article that a family of related constructions is required to account for their distribution. We demonstrate that a number of generalizations follow from the semantics of the constructions we posit: the syntactic argument structure of the sentence is predicted by general principles of argument linking; and the aspectual structure of the sentence is determined by the aspectual structure of the constnictional subevent, ivhich (...)
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  37.  55
    Contrastive Focus Reduplication in English (the Salad-Salad Paper).Ray Jackendoff - unknown
    This paper presents a phenomenon of colloquial English that we call Contrastive Reduplication (CR), involving the copying of words and sometimes phrases as in It’s tuna salad, not SALAD-salad, or Do you LIKE-HIM-like him? Drawing on a corpus of examples gathered from natural speech, written texts, and television scripts, we show that CR restricts the interpretation of the copied element to a ‘real’ or prototypical reading. Turning to the structural properties of the construction, we show that CR is unusual among (...)
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  38. What's Special About the Human Language Faculty?Steven Pinker & Ray Jackendoff - 2005 - Cognition 95 (2).
  39.  31
    An Interpretive Theory of Negation.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1969 - Foundations of Language 5 (2):218-241.
  40. Locating Meaning in the Mind (Where It Belongs).Ray S. Jackendoff - 2006 - In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Blackwell.
  41.  74
    Construction After Construction and its Theoretical Challenges.Ray Jackendoff - manuscript
    The English NPN construction, exemplified by construction after construction, is productive with five prepositions — by, for, to, after, and upon — with a variety of meanings, including succession, juxtaposition, and comparison; it also has numerous idiomatic cases. This mixture of regularity and idiosyncrasy lends itself to an account in the spirit of construction grammar, in which the..
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  42.  10
    A Reconsideration of Dative Movements.Ray S. Jackendoff & Peter Culicover - 1971 - Foundations of Language 7 (3):397-412.
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  43.  21
    Quantifiers in English.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1968 - Foundations of Language 4 (4):422-442.
  44. Information is in the Mind of the Beholder.Ray Jackendoff - 1985 - Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (February):23-33.
  45.  62
    Semantic Combinatorial Processes in Argument Structure: Evidence From Light-Verbs.Jennifer Mack & Ray Jackendoff - unknown
    Any theory of how language is internally organized and how it interacts with other mental capacities must address the fundamental question of how syntactic and lexico-semantic information interact at one central linguistic compositional level, the sentence level. With this general objective in mind, we examine ““lightverbs””, so called because the main thrust of the semantic relations of the predicate that they denote is found not in the predicate itself, but in the argument structure of the syntactic object that such a (...)
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  46.  57
    1. The Parallel Architecture.Ray Jackendoff - manuscript
    The basic premise of the Parallel Architecture (Jackendoff 1997, 2002) is that phonology, syntax, and semantics are independent generative components in language, each with its own primitives and principles of combination. The theory builds on insights about linguistic structure that emerged in the 1970s. First, phonology was demonstrated to have highly articulated structure that cannot be derived directly from syntax: structured units such as syllables and prosodic constituents do not correspond one-to-one with syntactic units. Moreover, phonological structure includes several independent (...)
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  47.  12
    What Would a Theory of Language Evolution Have to Look Like?Ray Jackendoff - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):737-738.
  48.  40
    Alternative Minimalist Visions of Language.Ray Jackendoff - unknown
    The primary goal of modern linguistic theory (at least in the circles I inhabit) is an explanation of the human language capacity and how it enables the child to acquire adult competence in language.1 Adult competence in turn is understood as the ability (or knowledge) to creatively map between sound and meaning, using a rich combinatorial system – the lexicon and grammar of the language. An adequate theory must satisfy at least three crucial constraints, which I will call the Descriptive (...)
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  49.  82
    The Simpler Syntax Hypothesis.Ray Jackendoff - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (9):413-418.
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  50.  36
    Language.Ray Jackendoff - manuscript
    Within cognitive science, language is often set apart (as it is in the present volume) from perception, action, learning, memory, concepts, and reasoning. Yet language is intertwined with all of them. Language perception is a kind of perception; language production is a kind of action. Vocabulary and grammar are learned and stored in long-term memory. As novel utterances are perceived or produced, they are built up in working memory. Concepts are most often studied in the context of word meanings; reasoning (...)
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