21 found
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  1.  59
    Passport to freedom? Immunity passports for COVID-19.Rebecca C. H. Brown, Julian Savulescu, Bridget Williams & Dominic Wilkinson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):652-659.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has led a number of countries to introduce restrictive ‘lockdown’ policies on their citizens in order to control infection spread. Immunity passports have been proposed as a way of easing the harms of such policies, and could be used in conjunction with other strategies for infection control. These passports would permit those who test positive for COVID-19 antibodies to return to some of their normal behaviours, such as travelling more freely and returning to work. The introduction of (...)
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  2.  28
    Responsibility in healthcare across time and agents.Rebecca C. H. Brown & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):636-644.
    It is unclear whether someone’s responsibility for developing a disease or maintaining his or her health should affect what healthcare he or she receives. While this dispute continues, we suggest that, if responsibility is to play a role in healthcare, the concept must be rethought in order to reflect the sense in which many health-related behaviours occur repeatedly over time and are the product of more than one agent. Most philosophical accounts of responsibility are synchronic and individualistic; we indicate here (...)
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  3.  19
    The unnaturalistic fallacy: COVID-19 vaccine mandates should not discriminate against natural immunity.Jonathan Pugh, Julian Savulescu, Rebecca C. H. Brown & Dominic Wilkinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):371-377.
    COVID-19 vaccine requirements have generated significant debate. Here, we argue that, on the evidence available, such policies should have recognised proof of natural immunity as a sufficient basis for exemption to vaccination requirements. We begin by distinguishing our argument from two implausible claims about natural immunity: natural immunity is superior to ‘artificial’ vaccine-induced immunity simply because it is ‘natural’ and it is better to acquire immunity through natural infection than via vaccination. We then briefly survey the evidence base for the (...)
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  4.  52
    Against Moral Responsibilisation of Health: Prudential Responsibility and Health Promotion.Rebecca C. H. Brown, Hannah Maslen & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (2):114-129.
    In this article, we outline a novel approach to understanding the role of responsibility in health promotion. Efforts to tackle chronic disease have led to an emphasis on personal responsibility and the identification of ways in which people can ‘take responsibility’ for their health by avoiding risk factors such as smoking and over-eating. We argue that the extent to which agents can be considered responsible for their health-related behaviour is limited, and as such, state health promotion which assumes certain forms (...)
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  5. In Science We Trust? Being Honest About the Limits of Medical Research During COVID-19.Walter Veit, Rebecca Brown & Brian D. Earp - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (1):22-24.
    As a result of the world-wide COVID-19 epidemic, an internal tension in the goals of medicine has come to the forefront of public debate. Medical professionals are continuously faced with a tug of...
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  6.  49
    Moral responsibility for (un)healthy behaviour.Rebecca C. H. Brown - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):695-698.
    Combatting chronic, lifestyle-related disease has become a healthcare priority in the developed world. The role personal responsibility should play in healthcare provision has growing pertinence given the growing significance of individual lifestyle choices for health. Media reporting focussing on the ‘bad behaviour’ of individuals suffering lifestyle-related disease, and policies aimed at encouraging ‘responsibilisation’ in healthcare highlight the importance of understanding the scope of responsibility ascriptions in this context. Research into the social determinants of health and psychological mechanisms of health behaviour (...)
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  7.  30
    Resisting Moralisation in Health Promotion.Rebecca C. H. Brown - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (4):997-1011.
    Health promotion efforts are commonly directed towards encouraging people to discard ‘unhealthy’ and adopt ‘healthy’ behaviours in order to tackle chronic disease. Typical targets for behaviour change interventions include diet, physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption, sometimes described as ‘lifestyle behaviours.’ In this paper, I discuss how efforts to raise awareness of the impact of lifestyles on health, in seeking to communicate the need for people to change their behaviour, can contribute to a climate of ‘healthism’ and promote the moralisation (...)
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  8. Responsibility, prudence and health promotion.Rebecca Charlotte Helena Brown, Hannah Maslen & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Journal of Public Health 41 (3):561-565.
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  9.  30
    Reframing the Debate Around State Responses to Infertility: Considering the Harms of Subfertility and Involuntary Childlessness.Rebecca C. H. Brown, Wendy A. Rogers, Vikki A. Entwistle & Siladitya Bhattacharya - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):290-300.
    Many countries are experiencing increasing levels of demand for access to assisted reproductive technologies. Policies regarding who can access ART and with what support from a collective purse are highly contested, raising questions about what state responses are justified. Whilst much of this debate has focused on the status of infertility as a disease, we argue that this is something of a distraction, since disease framing does not provide the far-reaching, robust justification for state support that proponents of ART seem (...)
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  10.  6
    Irresponsibly Infertile? Obesity, Efficiency, and Exclusion from Treatment.Rebecca Brown - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (2):61-76.
    Many countries tightly ration access to publicly funded fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilisation. One basis for excluding people from access to IVF is their body mass index. In this paper, I consider a number of potential justifications for such a policy, based on claims about effectiveness and cost-efficiency, and reject these as unsupported by available evidence. I consider an alternative justification: that those whose subfertility results from avoidable behaviours for which they are responsible are less deserving of treatment. (...)
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  11. Financial incentives to encourage healthy behaviour: an analysis of UK media.Hannah Parke, Richard Ashcroft, Rebecca Brown & Clive Seale - 2013 - Health Expectations 16 (3):292-304.
    Background Policies to use financial incentives to encourage healthy behaviour are controversial. Much of this controversy is played out in the mass media, both reflecting and shaping public opinion. Objective To describe UK mass media coverage of incentive schemes, comparing schemes targeted at different client groups and assessing the relative prominence of the views of different interest groups. Design Thematic content analysis. Subjects National and local news coverage in newspapers, news media targeted at health-care providers and popular websites between January (...)
     
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  12.  4
    Response to Commentaries on ‘Responsibility in Healthcare Across Time and Agents’.Rebecca C. H. Brown & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):652-653.
    Let us first thank the four commentators who have taken the time to read and thoughtfully reflect on our paper. In that paper, we discuss how responsibility concepts must be sensitive to the temporal and social aspects of health-related behaviour, if responsibility is to play a role in health policy. This ‘if’ is a big one, and Hanna Pickard rightly challenges our position of neutrality with regard to whether or not responsibility should be incorporated into health policy.1 Pickard proposes that (...)
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  13.  11
    Social values and the corruption argument against financial incentives for healthy behaviour.Rebecca C. H. Brown - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (3):140-144.
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  14.  4
    Proportionality, wrongs and equipoise for natural immunity exemptions: response to commentators.Jonathan Pugh, Julian Savulescu, Rebecca C. H. Brown & Dominic Wilkinson - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    We would like to thank each of the commentators on our feature article for their thoughtful engagement with our arguments. All the commentaries raise important questions about our proposed justification for natural immunity exemptions to COVID-19 vaccine mandates. Thankfully, for some of the points raised, we can simply signal our agreement. For instance, Reiss is correct to highlight that our article did not address the important US-centric considerations she helpfully raises and fruitfully discusses. We also agree with Williams about the (...)
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  15.  5
    Broad Medical Uncertainty and the ethical obligation for openness.Rebecca C. H. Brown, Mícheál de Barra & Brian D. Earp - 2022 - Synthese 200 (2):1-29.
    This paper argues that there exists a collective epistemic state of ‘Broad Medical Uncertainty’ regarding the effectiveness of many medical interventions. We outline the features of BMU, and describe some of the main contributing factors. These include flaws in medical research methodologies, bias in publication practices, financial and other conflicts of interest, and features of how evidence is translated into practice. These result in a significant degree of uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of many medical treatments and unduly optimistic beliefs about (...)
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  16.  12
    Prospective Intention-Based Lifestyle Contracts: mHealth Technology and Responsibility in Healthcare.Emily Feng-Gu, Jim Everett, Rebecca C. H. Brown, Hannah Maslen, Justin Oakley & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Health Care Analysis 29 (3):189-212.
    As the rising costs of lifestyle-related diseases place increasing strain on public healthcare systems, the individual’s role in disease may be proposed as a healthcare rationing criterion. Literature thus far has largely focused on retrospective responsibility in healthcare. The concept of prospective responsibility, in the form of a lifestyle contract, warrants further investigation. The responsibilisation in healthcare debate also needs to take into account innovative developments in mobile health technology, such as wearable biometric devices and mobile apps, which may change (...)
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  17. How constitutional theory found its soul : The contributions of Ronald Dworkin.Rebecca L. Brown - 2006 - In Scott Hershovitz (ed.), Exploring Law's Empire: The Jurisprudence of Ronald Dworkin. Oxford University Press.
  18. Perfecting Political Performance : Spinning, Gandhi and Virtuosity.Rebecca M. Brown - 2016 - In Arundhati Virmani (ed.), Political aesthetics: culture, critique and the everyday. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
     
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  19.  19
    Somatosensory Stimulus Intensity Encoding in Borderline Personality Disorder.Kathrin Malejko, Dominik Neff, Rebecca C. Brown, Paul L. Plener, Martina Bonenberger, Birgit Abler, Georg Grön & Heiko Graf - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  20.  12
    Increasing Knowledge, Skills, and Confidence Concerning Students’ Suicidality Through a Gatekeeper Workshop for School Staff.Rebecca C. Brown, Joana Straub, Isabelle Bohnacker & Paul L. Plener - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  21.  1
    Two stories from Mysterious.Rebecca Brown - 2017 - Common Knowledge 23 (1):116-119.
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