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Profile: Rebecca Kukla (University of South Florida)
  1.  9
    Mass Hysteria: Medicine, Culture, and Mothers' Bodies.Rebecca Kukla - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Mass Hysteria examines the medical and cultural practices surrounding pregnancy, new motherhood, and infant feeding. Late eighteenth century transformations in these practices reshaped mothers' bodies, and contemporary norms and routines of prenatal care and early motherhood have inherited the legacy of that era. As a result, mothers are socially positioned in ways that can make it difficult for them to establish and maintain healthy and safe boundaries and appropriate divisions between public and private space.
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  2. Performative Force, Convention, and Discursive Injustice.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):440-457.
    I explore how gender can shape the pragmatics of speech. In some circumstances, when a woman deploys standard discursive conventions in order to produce a speech act with a specific performative force, her utterance can turn out, in virtue of its uptake, to have a quite different force—a less empowering force—than it would have if performed by a man. When members of a disadvantaged group face a systematic inability to produce a specific kind of speech act that they are entitled (...)
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  3.  33
    “Author TBD”: Radical Collaboration in Contemporary Biomedical Research.Rebecca Kukla - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (5):845-858.
  4.  22
    Risk and the Pregnant Body.Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Lisa M. Mitchell, Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong, Lisa H. Harris, Rebecca Kukla, Miriam Kuppermann & Margaret Olivia Little - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (6):34-42.
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  5.  91
    Conscientious Autonomy: Displacing Decisions in Health Care.Rebecca Kukla - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (2):34-44.
    : The standard bioethics account is that respecting patient autonomy means ensuring patients make their own decisions. In fact, respecting patient autonomy often has more to do with the overall shape and meaning of patients' health care regimes, and sometimes, at least, patients will very reasonably defer to medical authority.
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  6. Rousseau's Republican Romance (Review).Rebecca Kukla - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):174-183.
  7.  28
    Finding Autonomy in Birth.Rebecca Kukla, Miriam Kuppermann, Margaret Little, Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Lisa M. Mitchell, Elizabeth M. Armstrong & Lisa Harris - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (1):1-8.
    Over the last several years, as cesarean deliveries have grown increasingly common, there has been a great deal of public and professional interest in the phenomenon of women 'choosing' to deliver by cesarean section in the absence of any specific medical indication. The issue has sparked intense conversation, as it raises questions about the nature of autonomy in birth. Whereas mainstream bioethical discourse is used to associating autonomy with having a large array of choices, this conception of autonomy does not (...)
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  8. Naturalizing Objectivity.Rebecca Kukla - 2008 - Perspectives on Science 16 (3):pp. 285-302.
    We can understand objectivity, in the broadest sense of the term, as epistemic accountability to the real. Since at least the 1986 publication of Sandra Harding’s The Science Question in Feminism, so-called standpoint epistemologists have sought to build an understanding of such objectivity that does not essentially anchor it to a dislocated, ‘view from nowhere’ stance on the part of the judging subject. Instead, these theorists have argued that a proper understanding of objectivity must recognize that different agential standpoints offer (...)
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  9. Myth, Memory and Misrecognition in Sellars' ``Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind''.Rebecca Kukla - 2000 - Philosophical Studies 101 (2-3):161-211.
  10. The Ontology and Temporality of Conscience.Rebecca Kukla - 2002 - Continental Philosophy Review 35 (1):1-34.
    Philosophers have often posited a foundational calling voice, such that hearing its call constitutes subjects as responsive and responsible negotiators of normative claims. I give the name ldquo;transcendental conscience to that which speaks in this founding, constitutive voice. The role of transcendental conscience is not – or not merely – to normatively bind the subject, but to constitute the possibility of the subject's being bound by any particular, contentful normative claims in the first place. I explore the ontological and temporal (...)
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  11.  70
    Holding the Body of Another.Rebecca Kukla - 2007 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 11 (2):397-408.
  12.  33
    Measuring Mothering.Rebecca Kukla - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):67-90.
    As a culture, we have a tendency to measure motherhood in terms of a set of signal moments that have become the focus of special social attention and anxiety; we interpret these as emblematic summations of women's mothering abilities. Women's performances during these moments can seem to exhaust the story of mothering, and mothers often internalize these measures and evaluate their own mothering in terms of them. "Good" mothers are those who pass a series of tests—they bond properly during their (...)
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  13.  24
    Living with Pirates.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):75-85.
  14. Perception, Language, and the First Person.Mark Lance & Rebecca Kukla - unknown
    Pragmatism has enjoyed a major resurgence in Anglo-American philosophy over the course of the last decade or two, and Robert Brandom’s work – particularly his 1994 tome Making it Explicit (MIE) – has been at the vanguard of this resurgence (Brandom 1994).2 But pragmatism comes in several surprisingly distinct flavours. Authors such as Hubert Dreyfus find their roots in certain parts of Heidegger and in phenomenologists such as Merleau-Ponty, and they privilege embodied, preconceptual skills as opposed to discursive practices as (...)
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  15.  49
    Contingent Natures and Virtuous Knowers: Could Epistemology Be 'Gendered'?Rebecca Kukla & Laura Ruetsche - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):389 - 418.
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  16.  51
    How Do Patients Know?Rebecca Kukla - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (5):27-35.
    : The way patients make health care decisions is much more complicated than is often recognized. Patient autonomy allows both that patients will sometimes defer to clinicians and that they should sometimes be active inquirers, ready to question their clinicians and do some independent research. At the same time, patients' active inquiry requires clinicians' support.
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  17.  1
    Accountability and Values in Radically Collaborative Research.Eric Winsberg, Bryce Huebner & Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 46:16-23.
    This paper discusses a crisis of accountability that arises when scientific collaborations are massively epistemically distributed. We argue that social models of epistemic collaboration, which are social analogs to what Patrick Suppes called a “model of the experiment,” must play a role in creating accountability in these contexts. We also argue that these social models must accommodate the fact that the various agents in a collaborative project often have ineliminable, messy, and conflicting interests and values; any story about accountability in (...)
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  18.  9
    Ingrouping, Outgrouping, and the Pragmatics of Peripheral Speech.Cassie Herbert & Rebecca Kukla - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (4):576-596.
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  19. The Antinomies of Impure Reason: Rousseau and Kant on the Metaphysics of Truth-Telling.Rebecca Kukla - 2005 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):203 – 231.
    Truth-telling is a project that is both gripping and problematic for Rousseau, as he is both captured by an ideal of telling as complete, undistorted discernment, documentation and communication, and also haunted by the fear that telling can never be this innocent. For Rousseau, as for Kant, telling does not leave the told untouched; rather, telling gives us a type of contact with objects that is marked and mediated by the process of telling itself, and hence the possibility of immediately (...)
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  20. Resituating the Principle of Equipoise: Justice and Access to Care in Non-Ideal Conditions.Rebecca Kukla - 2007 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):171-202.
    : The principle of equipoise traditionally is grounded in the special obligations of physician-investigators to provide research participants with optimal care. This grounding makes the principle hard to apply in contexts with limited health resources, to research that is not directed by physicians, or to non-therapeutic research. I propose a different version of the principle of equipoise that does not depend upon an appeal to the Hippocratic duties of physicians and that is designed to be applicable within a wider range (...)
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  21.  32
    Delimiting the Proper Scope of Epistemology.Rebecca Kukla - 2015 - Philosophical Perspectives 29 (1):202-216.
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  22.  5
    Ethics and Ideology in Breastfeeding Advocacy Campaigns.Rebecca Kukla - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):157-180.
    Mothers serve as an important layer of the health-care system, with special responsibilities to care for the health of families and nations. In our social discourse, we tend to treat maternal "choices" as though they were morally and causally self-contained units of influence with primary control over children's health. In this essay, I use infant feeding as a lens for examining the ethical contours of mothers' caretaking practices and responsibilities, as they are situated within cultural meanings and institutional pressures. I (...)
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  23.  61
    Objectivity and Perspective in Empirical Knowledge.Rebecca Kukla - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):80-95.
    Epistemologists generally think that genuine warrant that is available to anyone must be available to everyone who is exposed to the relevant causal inputs and is able and willing to properly exercise her rationality. The motivating idea behind this requirement is roughly that an objective view is one that is not bound to a particular perspective. In this paper I ask whether the aperspectivality of our warrants is a precondition for securing the objectivity of our claims. I draw upon a (...)
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  24. A Paramount Narrative: Exploring Space on the Starship Enterprise.Sarah Hardy & Rebecca Kukla - 1999 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):177-191.
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  25.  50
    Ethics and Ideology in Breastfeeding Advocacy Campaigns.Rebecca Kukla - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):157-181.
    : Mothers serve as an important layer of the health-care system, with special responsibilities to care for the health of families and nations. In our social discourse, we tend to treat maternal "choices" as though they were morally and causally self-contained units of influence with primary control over children's health. In this essay, I use infant feeding as a lens for examining the ethical contours of mothers' caretaking practices and responsibilities, as they are situated within cultural meanings and institutional pressures. (...)
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  26. Talking Back: Monstrosity, Mundanity, and Cynicism in Television Talk Shows.Rebecca Kukla - unknown
    Fertile grounds for theoretical inquiry can be found in the oddest corners. Contemporary television programming provides viewers with several talk shows of the grotesque, as I will call them, in which the aim of each episode is to put some monstrous human phenomenon on display with the help of a host and a participating studio audience. In this paper I will try to support the unlikely claim that these talk shows, which include The Jerry Springer Show and Sally Jesse Raphael (...)
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  27.  5
    Infertility, Epistemic Risk, and Disease Definitions.Rebecca Kukla - forthcoming - Synthese:1-20.
    I explore the role that values and interests, especially ideological interests, play in managing and balancing epistemic risks in medicine. I will focus in particular on how diseases are identified and operationalized. Before we can do biomedical research on a condition, it needs to be identified as a medical condition, and it needs to be operationalized in a way that lets us identify sufferers, measure progress, and so forth. I will argue that each time we do this, we engage in (...)
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  28.  54
    Leave the Gun; Take the Cannoli! The Pragmatic Topography of Second-Person Calls.Mark Lance & Rebecca Kukla - 2013 - Ethics 123 (3):456-478.
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  29.  50
    Accountability and Values in Radically Collaborative Research.Eric Winsberg, Bryce Huebner & Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 46:16-23.
    This paper discusses a crisis of accountability that arises when scientific collaborations are massively epistemically distributed. We argue that social models of epistemic collaboration, which are social analogs to what Patrick Suppes called a “model of the experiment,” must play a role in creating accountability in these contexts. We also argue that these social models must accommodate the fact that the various agents in a collaborative project often have ineliminable, messy, and conflicting interests and values; any story about accountability in (...)
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  30.  2
    How to Get an Interpretivist Committed.Rebecca Kukla - 2000 - ProtoSociology 14:180-221.
    I argue that interpretivists ought to broaden and enrich the constitutive standards of interpretability and epistemic agency that they have inherited from classic Davidsonian theory. Drawing heavily upon John Haugeland’s recent account of objective truth- telling, I claim that in order to be an interpretable epistemic agent at all, a being must have various kinds of practical commitments that cannot be reduced to combinations of beliefs and desires.On the basis of this claim, I argue that radical interpreters must appeal to (...)
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  31.  8
    Gender Identity, Gendered Spaces, and Figuring Out What You Love.Rebecca Kukla - 2016 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (2):183-189.
    Three years ago, as my fortieth birthday disappeared into the far distance in my rearview mirror, driven by a combination of vanity and fear of my own mortality and decrepitude, I committed to getting in shape.I’ve always been fairly active: I have always walked a lot, commuted by bike when that was plausible, avoided driving whenever possible, and just generally been high energy. But a childhood full of failure at team sports and a lack of innate gifts in the coordination (...)
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  32.  91
    Analytic Philosophy and the Return of Hegelian Thought (Review).Rebecca Kukla - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 113-115.
    In this book, Paul Redding argues both that Hegel’s thought is making a resurgence in some quarters of analytic philosophy, and that such a resurgence is well-deserved and will bear future fruit. He begins with Bertrand Russell’s story of analytic philosophy as born out of a rejection of Hegelian thought, and traces the development of an alternative path through analytic philosophy that moves through Frege, Wittgenstein, Sellars, and Evans, and finds its fullest contemporary form in Brandom and McDowell. This alternative (...)
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  33. Measuring Mothering.Rebecca Kukla - 2008 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):67-90.
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  34.  11
    Attention and Blindness: Objectivity and Contingency in Moral Perception.Rebecca Kukla - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (sup1):319-346.
  35. The Coupling of Human Souls: Rousseau and the Problem of Gender Relations.Rebecca Kukla - 1996 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 46:57-92.
     
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  36.  71
    Appendix to Rebecca Kukla and Mark Lance 'Yo!' And 'Lo!': The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons.Greg Restall, Rebecca Kukla & Mark Lance - manuscript
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  37.  72
    Cognitive Models and Representation.Rebecca Kukla - 1992 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (2):219-32.
    Several accounts of representation in cognitive systems have recently been proposed. These look for a theory that will establish how a representation comes to have a certain content, and how these representations are used by cognitive systems. Covariation accounts are unsatisfactory, as they make intelligent reasoning and cognition impossible. Cummins' interpretation-based account cannot explain the distinction between cognitive and non-cognitive systems, nor how certain cognitive representations appear to have intrinsic meaning. Cognitive systems can be defined as model-constructers, or systems that (...)
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  38.  25
    Intersubjectivity and Receptive Experience.Rebecca Kukla & Mark Lance - 2014 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):22-42.
    Wilfrid Sellars's iconic exposé of the ‘myth of the given’ taught us that experience must present the world to us as normatively laden, in the sense that the contents of experience must license inferences, rule out and justify various beliefs, and rationalize actions. Somehow our beliefs must be governed by the objects as they present themselves to us. Often this requirement is cashed out using language that attributes agent-like properties to objects: we are described as ‘accountable to’ objects, while objects (...)
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  39.  10
    Editorial Note.Rebecca Kukla - 2015 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (4):vii-ix.
    This issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal continues two conversations that have been developing in this journal over the last few years, and introduces a new and timely one. Kevin Elliot and Paul Mushak’s paper, “Structured Development and Promotion of a Research Field: Hormesis in Biology, Toxicology, and Environmental Regulatory Science,” continues an ongoing debate in this journal over the role of values in shaping scientific methodology and communication, and how this role should be managed at the level (...)
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  40.  2
    Whose Job Is It to Fight Climate Change?Rebecca Kukla - 2016 - Social Theory and Practice 42 (4):871-878.
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  41.  2
    Editor's Note.Rebecca Kukla - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (4):vii-viii.
    Bioethicists have, of course, always been concerned with death: we have asked when should we allow it to happen without trying to stave it off any longer; whether is it ever acceptable for doctors to hasten or cause it; how can we make death a dignified and relatively humane experience for the dying and for their loved ones; and how we can and cannot treat human remains. We discussed all of these classic ethical issues even when death itself seemed to (...)
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  42.  37
    Introduction: Maternal Bodies.Rebecca Kukla - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):vii-ix.
  43.  28
    Communicating Consent.Rebecca Kukla - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (3):45-47.
  44.  21
    Attention and Blindness.Rebecca Kukla - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (Supplement):319-346.
  45.  3
    Editorial Note.Rebecca Kukla - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (2):vii-ix.
    This quarter’s issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal is unusual, because it hosts a symposium focused Brian Earp’s provocative and groundbreaking article, “Between Moral Relativism and Moral Hypocrisy: Reframing the Debate on ‘FGM.’” Along with Earp’s article, we are presenting critical responses by Richard Shweder, Robert Darby, and Jamie Nelson. Earp tackles the ethics of female genital cutting or “mutilation”. This is a difficult topic that brings on board gender inequity, the integrity of the body, the value of (...)
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  46.  11
    Response to Strong and Beauchamp.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):99-103.
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  47.  11
    The Ethical Force Program is a Multi.Rebecca Kukla & Harry R. Moody - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
  48.  11
    Editorial Note.Rebecca Kukla - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (4).
    It gives me great pleasure to introduce the December 2013 issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal—our ninety-second!—and to introduce myself as the new Editor-in-Chief of the journal. For almost a quarter of a century, from its special vantage point in Washington, D.C., and at Georgetown University’s Joseph and Rose Kennedy Institute of Ethics, the KIEJ has served as a leading source for practically engaged, policy-relevant philosophical work in bioethics, broadly construed. Under the expert stewardship of Robert Veatch and (...)
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  49.  6
    Joseph Rouse: How Scientific Practices Matter: Reclaiming Philosophical Naturalism. [REVIEW]Rebecca Kukla - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (2):216-219.
  50.  5
    Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality by Helen Longino.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (1):E-97-E-103.
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