Results for 'Rebecca Ring'

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  1. Normative Practices of Other Animals.Sarah Vincent, Rebecca Ring & Kristin Andrews - 2018 - In Aaron Zimmerman, Karen Jones & Mark Timmons (eds.), Routledge Handbook on Moral Epistemology. New York: Routledge. pp. 57-83.
    Traditionally, discussions of moral participation – and in particular moral agency – have focused on fully formed human actors. There has been some interest in the development of morality in humans, as well as interest in cultural differences when it comes to moral practices, commitments, and actions. However, until relatively recently, there has been little focus on the possibility that nonhuman animals have any role to play in morality, save being the objects of moral concern. Moreover, when nonhuman cases are (...)
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  2.  14
    Do Psychiatric Advance Directives Protect Autonomy?Marcia Sue DeWolf Bosek, Marcia Ellen Ring & Rebecca F. Cady - 2008 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 10 (1):17-24.
  3. Animal cognition.Kristin Andrews & Susana Monsó - 2021 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Philosophical attention to animals can be found in a wide range of texts throughout the history of philosophy, including discussions of animal classification in Aristotle and Ibn Bâjja, of animal rationality in Porphyry, Chrysippus, Aquinas and Kant, of mental continuity and the nature of the mental in Dharmakīrti, Telesio, Conway, Descartes, Cavendish, and Voltaire, of animal self-consciousness in Ibn Sina, of understanding what others think and feel in Zhuangzi, of animal emotion in Śāntarakṣita and Bentham, and of human cultural uniqueness (...)
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  4.  37
    ‘Yo!’ and ‘Lo!’: The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons.Rebecca Kukla & Mark Lance - 2009 - Harvard University Press.
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  5. That’s What She Said: The Language of Sexual Negotiation.Rebecca Kukla - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):70-97.
    I explore how we negotiate sexual encounters with one another in language and consider the pragmatic structure of such negotiations. I defend three theses: Discussions of consent have dominated the philosophical and legal discourse around sexual negotiation, and this has distorted our understanding of sexual agency and ethics. Of central importance to good-quality sexual negotiation are sexual invitations and gift offers, as well as speech designed to set up safe frameworks and exit conditions. Sexual communication that goes well does not (...)
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  6.  71
    Motivated proofs: What they are, why they matter and how to write them.Rebecca Lea Morris - 2020 - Review of Symbolic Logic 13 (1):23-46.
    Mathematicians judge proofs to possess, or lack, a variety of different qualities, including, for example, explanatory power, depth, purity, beauty and fit. Philosophers of mathematical practice have begun to investigate the nature of such qualities. However, mathematicians frequently draw attention to another desirable proof quality: being motivated. Intuitively, motivated proofs contain no "puzzling" steps, but they have received little further analysis. In this paper, I begin a philosophical investigation into motivated proofs. I suggest that a proof is motivated if and (...)
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  7.  79
    Do mathematical explanations have instrumental value?Rebecca Lea Morris - 2019 - Synthese (2):1-20.
    Scientific explanations are widely recognized to have instrumental value by helping scientists make predictions and control their environment. In this paper I raise, and provide a first analysis of, the question whether explanatory proofs in mathematics have analogous instrumental value. I first identify an important goal in mathematical practice: reusing resources from existing proofs to solve new problems. I then consider the more specific question: do explanatory proofs have instrumental value by promoting reuse of the resources they contain? In general, (...)
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  8. Infertility, epistemic risk, and disease definitions.Rebecca Kukla - 2019 - Synthese 196 (11):4409-4428.
    I explore the role that values and interests, especially ideological interests, play in managing and balancing epistemic risks in medicine. I will focus in particular on how diseases are identified and operationalized. Before we can do biomedical research on a condition, it needs to be identified as a medical condition, and it needs to be operationalized in a way that lets us identify sufferers, measure progress, and so forth. I will argue that each time we do this, we engage in (...)
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  9. Slurs, Interpellation, and Ideology.Rebecca Kukla - 2018 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 56 (S1):7-32.
    The goal of this paper is to give an account of the pragmatic and social function of slurs, taken as speech acts. I develop a theory of the distinctive illocutionary force and pragmatic structure of slurs. I argue that slurs help to produce subjects who occupy social identities carved out by pernicious ideologies, and that they do this whether or not anyone involved intends for the slur to work that way or has any particular feelings or conscious thoughts associated with (...)
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  10.  38
    Artificial grammar learning by 1-year-olds leads to specific and abstract knowledge.Rebecca L. Gomez & LouAnn Gerken - 1999 - Cognition 70 (2):109-135.
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  11. Being together, worlds apart: a virtual-worldly phenomenology.Rebecca A. Hardesty & Ben Sheredos - 2019 - Human Studies (3):1-28.
    Previous work in Game Studies has centered on several loci of investigation in seeking to understand virtual gameworlds. First, researchers have scrutinized the concept of the virtual world itself and how it relates to the idea of “the magic circle”. Second, the field has outlined various forms of experienced “presence”. Third, scholarship has noted that the boundaries between the world of everyday life and virtual worlds are porous, and that this fosters a multiplicity of identities as players identify both with (...)
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  12.  76
    Mass Hysteria: Medicine, Culture, and Mothers' Bodies.Rebecca Kukla - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Mass Hysteria examines the medical and cultural practices surrounding pregnancy, new motherhood, and infant feeding. Late eighteenth century transformations in these practices reshaped mothers' bodies, and contemporary norms and routines of prenatal care and early motherhood have inherited the legacy of that era. As a result, mothers are socially positioned in ways that can make it difficult for them to establish and maintain healthy and safe boundaries and appropriate divisions between public and private space.
  13.  80
    “Author TBD”: Radical Collaboration in Contemporary Biomedical Research.Rebecca Kukla - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (5):845-858.
    Ghostwriting scandals are pervasive in industry-funded biomedical research, and most responses to them have presumed that they represent a sharp transgression of the norms of scientific authorship. I argue that in fact, ghostwriting represents a continuous extension of current socially accepted authorship practices. I claim that the radically collaborative, decentralized, interdisciplinary research that forms the gold standard in medicine is in an important sense unauthored, and that this poses a serious problem in applied social epistemology. It is no easy matter (...)
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  14.  89
    Intersubjectivity and Receptive Experience.Rebecca Kukla & Mark Lance - 2014 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):22-42.
    Wilfrid Sellars's iconic exposé of the ‘myth of the given’ taught us that experience must present the world to us as normatively laden, in the sense that the contents of experience must license inferences, rule out and justify various beliefs, and rationalize actions. Somehow our beliefs must be governed by the objects as they present themselves to us. Often this requirement is cashed out using language that attributes agent-like properties to objects: we are described as ‘accountable to’ objects, while objects (...)
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  15.  37
    Bioethics, medicine, and the criminal law.Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett & Suzanne Ost (eds.) - 2013 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Who should define what constitutes ethical and lawful medical practice? Judges? Doctors? Scientists? Or someone else entirely? This volume analyses how effectively criminal law operates as a forum for resolving ethical conflict in the delivery of health care. It addresses key questions such as: how does criminal law regulate controversial bioethical areas? What effect, positive or negative, does the use of criminal law have when regulating bioethical conflict? And can the law accommodate moral controversy? By exploring criminal law in theory (...)
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  16.  20
    A look from the inside: perspectives on the expansion of food assistance programs at Michigan farmers markets.Rebecca Mino, Kimberly Chung & Dru Montri - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (4):823-835.
    There has been a recent push to offer more food assistance programs at farmers markets. Yet, as more programs are developed for farmers markets, little input has been sought from those who are ultimately responsible for their implementation. This ethnographic study explores the experiences of farmers markets that have been early adopters of federal food assistance programs. Participant observation and in-depth interviews were used in six early-adopting markets to understand staff perspectives on the challenges and benefits of administering food assistance (...)
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  17. Measuring mothering.Rebecca Kukla - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):67-90.
    As a culture, we have a tendency to measure motherhood in terms of a set of signal moments that have become the focus of special social attention and anxiety; we interpret these as emblematic summations of women's mothering abilities. Women's performances during these moments can seem to exhaust the story of mothering, and mothers often internalize these measures and evaluate their own mothering in terms of them. "Good" mothers are those who pass a series of tests—they bond properly during their (...)
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  18. Objectivity and perspective in empirical knowledge.Rebecca Kukla - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):80-95.
    Epistemologists generally think that genuine warrant that is available to anyone must be available to everyone who is exposed to the relevant causal inputs and is able and willing to properly exercise her rationality. The motivating idea behind this requirement is roughly that an objective view is one that is not bound to a particular perspective. In this paper I ask whether the aperspectivality of our warrants is a precondition for securing the objectivity of our claims. I draw upon a (...)
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  19. Delimiting the Proper Scope of Epistemology.Rebecca Kukla - 2015 - Philosophical Perspectives 29 (1):202-216.
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  20. The ontology and temporality of conscience.Rebecca Kukla - 2002 - Continental Philosophy Review 35 (1):1-34.
    Philosophers have often posited a foundational calling voice, such that hearing its call constitutes subjects as responsive and responsible negotiators of normative claims. I give the name ldquo;transcendental conscience to that which speaks in this founding, constitutive voice. The role of transcendental conscience is not – or not merely – to normatively bind the subject, but to constitute the possibility of the subject's being bound by any particular, contentful normative claims in the first place. I explore the ontological and temporal (...)
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  21.  51
    The role of control functions in mentalizing: Dual-task studies of Theory of Mind and executive function.Rebecca Bull, Louise H. Phillips & Claire A. Conway - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):663-672.
  22.  64
    Living with Pirates.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):75-85.
  23.  40
    Objectivity and Perspective in Empirical Knowledge.Rebecca Kukla - 2006 - Episteme: A Journal of Social Epistemology 3 (1):80-95.
    Epistemologists generally think that genuine warrant that is available to anyone must be available to everyone who is exposed to the relevant causal inputs and is able and willing to properly exercise her rationality. The motivating idea behind this requirement is roughly that an objective view is one that is not bound to a particular perspective. In this paper I ask whether the aperspectivality of our warrants is a precondition for securing the objectivity of our claims. I draw upon a (...)
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  24. Myth, memory and misrecognition in Sellars' ``empiricism and the philosophy of mind''.Rebecca Kukla - 2000 - Philosophical Studies 101 (2-3):161-211.
  25.  73
    Finding autonomy in birth.Rebecca Kukla, Miriam Kuppermann, Margaret Little, Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Lisa M. Mitchell, Elizabeth M. Armstrong & Lisa Harris - 2008 - Bioethics 23 (1):1-8.
    Over the last several years, as cesarean deliveries have grown increasingly common, there has been a great deal of public and professional interest in the phenomenon of women 'choosing' to deliver by cesarean section in the absence of any specific medical indication. The issue has sparked intense conversation, as it raises questions about the nature of autonomy in birth. Whereas mainstream bioethical discourse is used to associating autonomy with having a large array of choices, this conception of autonomy does not (...)
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  26.  98
    Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy.Rebecca Kukla (ed.) - 2006 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This volume explores the relationship between Kant's aesthetic theory and his critical epistemology as articulated in the Critique of Pure Reason and the Critique of the Power of Judgment. The essays, written specially for this volume, explore core elements of Kant's epistemology, such as his notions of discursive understanding, experience, and objective judgment. They also demonstrate a rich grasp of Kant's critical epistemology that enables a deeper understanding of his aesthetics. Collectively, the essays reveal that Kant's critical project, and the (...)
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  27.  4
    A Forgotten Spiritual Practice: Puritan Conference and Implications for the Church Today.Rebecca F. Carhart - 2019 - Journal of Spiritual Formation and Soul Care 12 (1):34-49.
    In Christian books today readers can find dozens of spiritual practices. One resource of the Protestant tradition, however, that has largely been forgotten is the Puritan practice of conference. This article describes how for the English Puritans conference exemplified the importance of communal spiritual life, then considers applications for the contemporary church. Conference refers to intentional conversation among believers about spiritual matters. Conference particularly expresses the value of Christian community and the need for the body of Christ to function together (...)
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  28.  87
    Contingent Natures and Virtuous Knowers.Rebecca Kukla & Laura Ruetsche - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):389-418.
    When Sandra Harding called for an epistemology of science whose systematic attention to the gendered Status of epistemic agents renders it ‘less partial and distorted’ than ‘traditional’ epistemologies, some commentators recoiled in horror. Propelled by ‘a mad form of the genetic fallacy’ they said, she descends ‘the slide to an arational account of science.’ On a less melodramatic reading, feminist epistemologies such as Harding's advocate not irrationalism, but senses of rationality more expanded than those which they associate with ‘traditional’ epistemology.
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  29. How do patients know?Rebecca Kukla - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (5):27-35.
    : The way patients make health care decisions is much more complicated than is often recognized. Patient autonomy allows both that patients will sometimes defer to clinicians and that they should sometimes be active inquirers, ready to question their clinicians and do some independent research. At the same time, patients' active inquiry requires clinicians' support.
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  30.  4
    The Concept of Health-Promoting Collaboration—A Starting Point to Reduce Presenteeism?Rebecca Komp, Simone Kauffeld & Patrizia Ianiro-Dahm - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Background: Since presenteeism is related to numerous negative health and work-related effects, measures are required to reduce it. There are initial indications that how an organization deals with health has a decisive influence on employees’ presenteeism behavior.Aims: The concept of health-promoting collaboration was developed on the basis of these indications. As an extension of healthy leadership it includes not only the leader but also co-workers. In modern forms of collaboration, leaders cannot be assigned sole responsibility for employees’ health, since the (...)
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  31. Resituating the principle of equipoise: Justice and access to care in non-ideal conditions.Rebecca Kukla - 2007 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):171-202.
    : The principle of equipoise traditionally is grounded in the special obligations of physician-investigators to provide research participants with optimal care. This grounding makes the principle hard to apply in contexts with limited health resources, to research that is not directed by physicians, or to non-therapeutic research. I propose a different version of the principle of equipoise that does not depend upon an appeal to the Hippocratic duties of physicians and that is designed to be applicable within a wider range (...)
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  32.  1
    The Values of Mathematical Proofs.Rebecca Lea Morris - 2024 - In Bharath Sriraman (ed.), Handbook of the History and Philosophy of Mathematical Practice. Cham: Springer. pp. 2081-2112.
    Proofs are central, and unique, to mathematics. They establish the truth of theorems and provide us with the most secure knowledge we can possess. It is thus perhaps unsurprising that philosophers once thought that the only value proofs have lies in establishing the truth of theorems. However, such a view is inconsistent with mathematical practice. If a proof’s only value is to show a theorem is true, then mathematicians would have no reason to reprove the same theorem in different ways, (...)
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  33.  7
    Early life exposure to air pollution impacts neuronal and glial cell function leading to impaired neurodevelopment.Rebecca H. Morris, Serena J. Counsell, Imelda M. McGonnell & Claire Thornton - 2021 - Bioessays 43 (9):2000288.
    The World Health Organisation recently listed air pollution as the most significant threat to human health. Air pollution comprises particulate matter (PM), metals, black carbon and gases such as ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO). In addition to respiratory and cardiovascular disease, PM exposure is linked with increased risk of neurodegeneration as well as neurodevelopmental impairments. Critically, studies suggest that PM crosses the placenta, making direct in utero exposure a reality. Rodent models reveal that neuroinflammation, neurotransmitter imbalance (...)
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  34. Introduction : Placing the aesthetic in Kant's critical epistemology.Rebecca Kukla - 2006 - In Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  35. Aquinas on the vice of sloth: Three interpretive issues.Rebecca DeYoung - 2011 - The Thomist 75 (1):43-64.
    Defining the capital vice of sloth (acedia) is a difficult business in Thomas Aquinas and in the Christian tradition of thought from which he draws his account. In this article, I will raise three problems for interpreting Aquinas's account of sloth. They are all related, as are the resolutions to them I will offer. The three problems can be framed as questions: How, on Aquinas's account, can sloth consistently be categorized as, first, a capital vice and, second, a spiritual vice? (...)
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  36. Attention and Blindness: Objectivity and Contingency in Moral Perception.Rebecca Kukla - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (sup1):319-346.
    Moral perception, as the term is used in moral theory, is the perception of normatively contoured objects and states of affairs, where that perception enables us to engage in practical reason and judgment concerning these particulars. The idea that our capacity for moral perception is a crucial component of our capacity for moral reasoning and agency finds its most explicit origin in Aristotle, for whom virtue begins with the quality of perception. The focus on moral perception within moral theory has (...)
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  37. Naturalizing objectivity.Rebecca Kukla - 2008 - Perspectives on Science 16 (3):pp. 285-302.
    We can understand objectivity, in the broadest sense of the term, as epistemic accountability to the real. Since at least the 1986 publication of Sandra Harding’s The Science Question in Feminism, so-called standpoint epistemologists have sought to build an understanding of such objectivity that does not essentially anchor it to a dislocated, ‘view from nowhere’ stance on the part of the judging subject. Instead, these theorists have argued that a proper understanding of objectivity must recognize that different agential standpoints offer (...)
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  38. Imagination and possibility.Rebecca Hanrahan - 2007 - Philosophical Forum 38 (2):125–146.
  39.  5
    Tshad ma rig paʼi gzhan sel gyi rnam gzhag skor la spyad pa.Bstan-Pa-Tshe-Ring - 2020 - Pe-cin: Mi-rigs Dpe-skrun-khang.
    Study on Buddhist philosophy and logic of affirming and non-affirming negative.
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  40. The Antinomies of Impure Reason: Rousseau and Kant on the Metaphysics of Truth‐Telling.Rebecca Kukla - 2005 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):203 – 231.
    Truth-telling is a project that is both gripping and problematic for Rousseau, as he is both captured by an ideal of telling as complete, undistorted discernment, documentation and communication, and also haunted by the fear that telling can never be this innocent. For Rousseau, as for Kant, telling does not leave the told untouched; rather, telling gives us a type of contact with objects that is marked and mediated by the process of telling itself, and hence the possibility of immediately (...)
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  41.  8
    Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome.Rebecca Langlands - 2018 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    This ground-breaking study conveys the thrill and moral power of the ancient Roman story-world and its ancestral tales of bloody heroism. Its account of 'exemplary ethics' explores how and what Romans learnt from these moral exempla, arguing that they disseminated widely not only core values such as courage and loyalty, but also key ethical debates and controversies which are still relevant for us today. Exemplary ethics encouraged controversial thinking, creative imitation, and a critical perspective on moral issues, and it plays (...)
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  42. Is the ‘hate’ in hate speech the ‘hate’ in hate crime? Waldron and Dworkin on political legitimacy.Rebecca Ruth Gould - 2019 - Jurisprudence 10 (2):171-187.
  43. Talking back: Monstrosity, mundanity, and cynicism in television talk shows.Rebecca Kukla - unknown
    Fertile grounds for theoretical inquiry can be found in the oddest corners. Contemporary television programming provides viewers with several talk shows of the grotesque, as I will call them, in which the aim of each episode is to put some monstrous human phenomenon on display with the help of a host and a participating studio audience. In this paper I will try to support the unlikely claim that these talk shows, which include The Jerry Springer Show and Sally Jesse Raphael (...)
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  44.  22
    The phrenological impulse and the morphology of character.Rebecca Kukla - 2009 - In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 76--99.
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  45.  41
    Whose Job Is It to Fight Climate Change?Rebecca Kukla - 2016 - Social Theory and Practice 42 (4):871-878.
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  46.  39
    Response to Strong and Beauchamp.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):99-103.
  47. The coupling of human souls: Rousseau and the problem of gender relations.Rebecca Kukla - 1996 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 46:57-92.
     
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  48. Bkaʼ bstan dgongs ʼgrel khyad ʼphags lta baʼi yang snying zhes bya ba bshugs so.Zla-Ba-Tshe-Ring - 2016 - Mundgod: ʼBras Blo-gling Dpe-mdzod-khang.
    Study on Pratītyasamutpāda, theory of relativity and causality in Buddhism with reference to canonical literature.
     
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  49.  90
    Holding the Body of Another.Rebecca Kukla - 2007 - Symposium 11 (2):397-408.
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  50.  2
    Dilemmas of Ethnic Minorities in Democracies: The Effect of Peace on the Palestinians in Israel.Rebecca Kook - 1995 - Politics and Society 23 (3):309-336.
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