Results for 'Rebekah L. Blakemore'

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  1.  16
    An Emotional Call to Action: Integrating Affective Neuroscience in Models of Motor Control.Rebekah L. Blakemore & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (4):299-309.
    Intimate relationships between emotion and action have long been acknowledged, yet contemporary theories and experimental research within affective and movement neuroscience have not been linked into a coherent framework bridging these two fields. Accumulating psychological and neuroimaging evidence has, however, brought new insights regarding how emotions affect the preparation, execution, and control of voluntary movement. Here we review main approaches and findings on such emotion–action interactions. To assimilate key emotion concepts of action tendencies and motive states with fundamental constructs of (...)
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  2.  22
    Author Reply: Emotion in Action – From Theories and Boxologies to Brain Circuits.Rebekah L. Blakemore & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (4):356-357.
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  3.  12
    Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Corticospinal Excitability During Motor Training.Rebekah L. S. Summers, Mo Chen, Andrea Hatch & Teresa J. Kimberley - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  4. Reasons and Divine Action: A Dilemma.Rebekah L. H. Rice - 2016 - In Kevin Timpe Dan Speak (ed.), Free Will and Theism: Connections, Contingencies, and Concerns. Oxford University Press.
    Many theistic philosophers conceive of God’s activity in agent-causal terms. That is, they view divine action as an instance of (perhaps the paradigm case of) substance causation. At the same time, many theists endorse the claim that God acts for reasons, and not merely wantonly. It is the aim of this paper to show that a commitment to both theses gives rise to a dilemma. I present the dilemma and then spend the bulk of the paper defending its premises. I (...)
     
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  5.  23
    Special Issue: Approaches to Faith: Guest Editorial Preface.Rebekah L. H. Rice, Daniel McKaughan & Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2017 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 81 (1-2):1-6.
    According to many accounts of faith—where faith is thought of as something psychological, e.g., an attitude, state, or trait—one cannot have faith without belief of the relevant propositions. According to other accounts of faith, one can have faith without belief of the relevant propositions. Call the first sort of account doxasticism since it insists that faith requires belief; call the second nondoxasticism since it allows faith without belief. The New Testament may seem to favor doxasticism over nondoxasticism. For it may (...)
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  6. Agent Causation and Acting for Reasons.Rebekah L. H. Rice - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (4):333-346.
    The Agent-Causal Theory of Action claims that an event counts as an action when, and only when, it is caused by an agent. The central difference between the Causal Theory of Action (CTA) and the Agent-Causal view comes down to a disagreement about what sort of item (or items) occupies the left-hand position in the causal relation. For CTA, the left-hand position is occupied by mental items within the agent, typically construed in terms of mental events (e.g., belief/desire pairs or (...)
     
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  7.  23
    What is a Causal Theorist to Do About Omissions?Rebekah L. H. Rice - 2011 - Modern Schoolman 88 (1-2):123-144.
    Most philosophers concede that one can properly be held morally responsible for intentionally omitting to do something. If one maintains that omissions are actions (negative actions, perhaps), then assuming the requisite conditions regarding voluntariness are met, one can tell a familiar story about how/why this is. In particular, causal theorists can explain the etiology of an intentional omission in causal terms. However, if one denies that omissions are actions of any kind, then the familiar story is no longer available. Some (...)
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  8. Approaches to Faith, Guest Editorial Preface.Daniel Howard Snyder, Rebekah L. H. Rice & Daniel J. McKaughan - 2017 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 81 (Special Double Issue):1-7.
    Springer. We find in contemporary culture starkly contrasting estimates of the value of faith. On the one hand, for many people, faith is a virtue or positive human value, something associated with understanding, hope, and love, something to be inculcated, maintained, and cherished. On the other hand, for many people, faith is a vice, something associated with dogmatism, arrogance, and close-mindedness, something to be avoided at all costs. The papers included in this special (double) issue on approaches to faith explore (...)
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  9.  14
    Mixed Effectiveness of rTMS and Retraining in the Treatment of Focal Hand Dystonia.Teresa J. Kimberley, Rebekah L. S. Schmidt, Mo Chen, Dennis D. Dykstra & Cathrin M. Buetefisch - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  10.  33
    Eluding the Illusion? Schizophrenia, Dopamine and the McGurk Effect.Thomas P. White, Rebekah L. Wigton, Dan W. Joyce, Tracy Bobin, Christian Ferragamo, Nisha Wasim, Stephen Lisk & Sukhwinder S. Shergill - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  11. The Pastor as Moral Guide.Rebekah L. Miles - 1999
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  12. Mental Causation.Rebekah L. H. Rice - forthcoming - In Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith & Neil Levy (eds.), Routledge Companion to Free Will. Routledge.
  13.  13
    Assessing Repetitive Negative Thinking Using Categorical and Transdiagnostic Approaches: A Comparison and Validation of Three Polish Language Adaptations of Self-Report Questionnaires.Monika Kornacka, Jacek Buczny & Rebekah L. Layton - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  14.  11
    Peer Influence in Adolescence: Public-Health Implications for COVID-19.Jack L. Andrews, Lucy Foulkes & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore - 2020 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 24 (8):585-587.
  15.  12
    Towards an Integration of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Cognitive Behavioural Strategies: An Example From a School-Based Injury Prevention Programme.Lisa Buckley, Mary Sheehan, Ian Shochet & Rebekah L. Chapman - 2013 - Educational Studies 39 (3):285-297.
    Adolescent risk-taking behaviour has potentially serious injury consequences and school-based behaviour change programmes provide potential for reducing such harm. A well-designed programme is likely to be theory-based and ecologically valid; however, it is rare that the operationalisation process of theories is described. The aim of this paper is to outline how the theory of planned behaviour and cognitive behavioural therapy informed intervention design in a school setting. Teacher interviews provided insights into strategies that might be implemented within the curriculum and (...)
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  16.  51
    William James, 'the World of Sense' and Trust in Testimony.Paul L. Harris & Rebekah A. Richert - 2008 - Mind and Language 23 (5):536-551.
    Abstract: William James argued that we ordinarily think of the objects that we can observe—things that belong to 'the world of sense'—as having an unquestioned reality. However, young children also assert the existence of entities that they cannot ordinarily observe. For example, they assert the existence of germs and souls. The belief in the existence of such unobservable entities is likely to be based on children's broader trust in other people's testimony about objects and situations that they cannot directly observe (...)
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  17.  41
    Confidentiality in End-of-Life and After-Death Situations.Rebekah J. Bardash, Caroline Burke & James L. Werth - 2002 - Ethics and Behavior 12 (3):205-222.
    Confidentiality is one of the foundations on which psychotherapy is built. Limitations on confidentiality in the therapeutic process have been explained and explored by many authors and organizations. However, controversy and confusion continue to exist with regard to the limitations on confidentiality in situations where clients are considering their options at the end of life and after a client has died. This article reviews these 2 areas and provides some suggestions for future research.
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  18. Why Must God Show Himself in Disguise : A Look at the Role of the Mirror in Attar's the Conference of the Birds.Rebekah Zwanzig - 2009 - In Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, Corrado Federici & Ernesto Virgulti (eds.), Disguise, Deception, Trompe-L'oeil: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Peter Lang.
  19.  14
    Why Must God Show Himself in Disguise? An Exploration of Sufism Within Farid Attar's" The Conference of the Birds.Rebekah Zwanzig - 2009 - In Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, Corrado Federici & Ernesto Virgulti (eds.), Disguise, Deception, Trompe-L'oeil: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Peter Lang. pp. 99--273.
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  20.  51
    Modelling the Mind.K. A. Mohyeldin Said (ed.) - 1990 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection by a distinguished group of philosophers, psychologists, and physiologists reflects an interdisciplinary approach to the central question of cognitive science: how do we model the mind? Among the topics explored are the relationships (theoretical, reductive, and explanatory) between philosophy, psychology, computer science, and physiology; what should be asked of models in science generally, and in cognitive science in particular; whether theoretical models must make essential reference to objects in the environment; whether there are human competences that are resistant, (...)
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  21.  17
    Mindwaves: Thoughts on Intelligence, Identity, and Consciousness.Colin Blakemore & Susan Greenfield - 1987 - Blackwell.
  22. Abnormalities in the Awareness of Action.Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Daniel M. Wolpert & Christopher D. Frith - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (6):237-242.
  23.  9
    The Ghost in My Body: Children's Developing Concept of the Soul.Rebekah Richert & Paul Harris - 2006 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 6 (3-4):409-427.
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  24.  25
    Semantic Constraints on Relevance.Diane Blakemore - 1987 - Blackwell.
  25.  12
    The Implications of Managing.Rebekah Baglini & Itamar Francez - 2016 - Journal of Semantics 33 (3):541-560.
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  26.  15
    Dualism Revisited: Body Vs. Mind Vs. Soul.Rebekah Richert & Paul Harris - 2008 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 8 (1-2):99-115.
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  27. Explaining the Symptoms of Schizophrenia: Abnormalities in the Awareness of Action.Christopher D. Frith, S. J. Blakemore & D. Wolpert - 2000 - Brain Research Reviews 31 (2):357-363.
  28.  68
    Higher Education in a State of Crisis: A Perspective From a Students' Quality Circle. [REVIEW]Rebekah Nahai & Sophie Österberg - 2012 - AI and Society 27 (3):387-398.
    This article introduces a Students’ Quality Circle in higher education, in the context of current debates. With increasing numbers of students entering the university and constrained financial resources in the sector, new approaches are needed, with new partnership between lecturers and students. The first Students’ Quality Circle at Kingston is located in a wider international context.
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  29. Self-Awareness and Action.Sarah-Jayne Blakemore & Chris Frith - 2003 - Current Opinion in Neurobiology. Special Issue 13 (2):219-224.
  30.  22
    The Anatomy of a Philosophical Hoax.Rebekah Spera & David M. Peña-Guzmán - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (1-2):156-174.
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  31.  44
    Tactile Expectations and the Perception of Self-Touch: An Investigation Using the Rubber Hand Paradigm.Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies, Terri J. Halleen & Martin Davies - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):505-519.
    The rubber hand paradigm is used to create the illusion of self-touch, by having the participant administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner, with an identical stimulus , administers stimulation to the participant’s hand. With synchronous stimulation, participants experience the compelling illusion that they are touching their own hand. In the current study, the robustness of this illusion was assessed using incongruent stimuli. The participant used the index finger of the right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic (...)
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  32. II—L. A. Paul: Categorical Priority and Categorical Collapse.L. A. Paul - 2013 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 87 (1):89-113.
    I explore some of the ways that assumptions about the nature of substance shape metaphysical debates about the structure of Reality. Assumptions about the priority of substance play a role in an argument for monism, are embedded in certain pluralist metaphysical treatments of laws of nature, and are central to discussions of substantivalism and relationalism. I will then argue that we should reject such assumptions and collapse the categorical distinction between substance and property.
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  33.  34
    Exploding Individuals: Engaging Indigenous Logic and Decolonizing Science.Rebekah Sinclair - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):58-74.
    Despite emerging attention to Indigenous philosophies both within and outside of feminism, Indigenous logics remain relatively underexplored and underappreciated. By amplifying the voices of recent Indigenous philosophies and literatures, I seek to demonstrate that Indigenous logic is a crucial aspect of Indigenous resurgence as well as political and ethical resistance. Indigenous philosophies provide alternatives to the colonial, masculinist tendencies of classical logic in the form of paraconsistent—many-valued—logics. Specifically, when Indigenous logics embrace the possibility of true contradictions, they highlight aspects of (...)
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  34.  37
    Personal Autonomy, Social Identity, and Oppressive Social Contexts.Rebekah Johnston - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):312-328.
    Attempts to articulate the ways in which membership in socially subordinated social identities can impede one's autonomy have largely unfolded as part of the debate between different types of internalist theories in relation to the problem of internalized oppression. The different internalist positions, however, employ a damage model for understanding the role of social subordination in limiting autonomy. I argue that we need an externalist condition in order to capture the ways in which membership in a socially subordinated identity can (...)
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  35. Development of the Self-Concept During Adolescence.Catherine Sebastian, Stephanie Burnett & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):441-446.
  36.  23
    Genomics in Research and Health Care with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.Rebekah McWhirter, Dianne Nicol & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Monash Bioethics Review 33 (2-3):203-209.
    Genomics is increasingly becoming an integral component of health research and clinical care. The perceived difficulties associated with genetic research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people mean that they have largely been excluded as research participants. This limits the applicability of research findings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. Emergent use of genomic technologies and personalised medicine therefore risk contributing to an increase in existing health disparities unless urgent action is taken. To allow the potential benefits of genomics (...)
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  37.  49
    Two Hands Are Better Than One: A New Assessment Method and a New Interpretation of the Non-Visual Illusion of Self-Touch.Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies & Martin Davies - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):956-964.
    A simple experimental paradigm creates the powerful illusion that one is touching one’s own hand even when the two hands are separated by 15 cm. The participant uses her right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner provides identical stimulation to the participant’s receptive left hand. Change in felt position of the receptive hand toward the prosthetic hand has previously led to the interpretation that the participant experiences self-touch at the location of the prosthetic hand, and (...)
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  38.  71
    Deluding the Motor System.Sarah-Jayne Blakemore - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):647-655.
    How do we know that our own actions belong to us? How are we able to distinguish self-generated sensory events from those that arise externally? In this paper, I will briefly discuss experiments that were designed to investigate these questions. In particularly, I will review psychophysical and neuroimaging studies that have investigated how we recognise the consequences of our own actions, and why patients with delusions of control confuse self-produced and externally produced actions and sensations. Studies investigating the failure of (...)
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  39.  43
    Dignity and Its Violation Examined Within the Context of Animal Ethics.Rebekah Humphreys - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (2):143-162.
    The word ‘dignity’ may be used in a presentational sense, for example, one might say “she presents herself with dignity”, or in a social sense, for example, one might say “she fulfilled her duty with dignity, or honour.” However, in this paper I will not be using ‘dignity’ in either of these senses. Rather, the sense of dignity I will be concerned with is one that is related to ideas about the value or worth of a being. This latter sense (...)
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  40.  23
    The Ability to Self-Tickle Following Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Dreaming.Mark Blagrove, Sarah-Jayne Blakemore & Ben R. J. Thayer - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):285-294.
    Self-produced tactile stimulation usually feels less tickly—is perceptually attenuated—relative to the same stimulation produced externally. This is not true, however, for individuals with schizophrenia. Here, we investigate whether the lack of attenuation to self-produced stimuli seen in schizophrenia also occurs for normal participants following REM dreams. Fourteen participants were stimulated on their left palm with a tactile stimulation device which allowed the same stimulus to be generated by the participant or by the experimenter. The level of self-tickling attenuation did not (...)
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  41. On Representing ‘True-in-L’ in L.Robert L. Martin - 1975 - Philosophia 5 (3):213-217.
  42.  88
    Social Cognitive Neuroscience: Where Are We Heading?Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Joel Winston & Uta Frith - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (5):216-222.
  43. Aristotle's De Anima : On Why the Soul is Not a Set of Capacities.Rebekah Johnston - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):185-200.
    Although it is common for interpreters of Aristotle's De Anima to treat the soul as a specially related set of powers of capacities, I argue against this view on the grounds that the plausible options for reconciling the claim that the soul is a set of powers with Aristotle's repeated claim that the soul is an actuality cannot be unsuccessful. Moreover, I argue that there are good reasons to be wary of attributing to Aristotle the view that the soul is (...)
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  44.  12
    Tactile Expectations and the Perception of Self-Touch: An Investigation Using the Rubber Hand Paradigm.Rebekah White, Anne Aimola Davies, Terri Halleen & Martin Davies - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):505-519.
    The rubber hand paradigm is used to create the illusion of self-touch, by having the participant administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner, with an identical stimulus, administers stimulation to the participant’s hand. With synchronous stimulation, participants experience the compelling illusion that they are touching their own hand. In the current study, the robustness of this illusion was assessed using incongruent stimuli. The participant used the index finger of the right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand (...)
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  45.  12
    Investigating the Cost to Ongoing Tasks Not Associated with Prospective Memory Task Requirements.Rebekah E. Smith & Shayne Loft - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 27:1-13.
  46.  9
    Top-Down Modulation of the Perception of Other People in Schizophrenia and Autism.Jennifer Cook, Guillaume Barbalat & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  47.  15
    A British National Observatory: The Building of the New Physical Observatory at Greenwich, 1889–1898.Rebekah Higgitt - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Science 47 (4):609-635.
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  48.  11
    Socio-Cognitive and Cultural Influences on Children’s Concepts of God.Anondah R. Saide & Rebekah A. Richert - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):22-40.
    The current study examined the impact of religious socialization practices and parents’ concepts on the development of an abstract religious concept in young children, and whether or not children’s socio-cognitive ability moderates the relationship between their religious concept and sources of information about the concept. 215 parent-child dyads from diverse religious backgrounds participated. Children were between the ages of 3.52 and 6.98 years of age. Four main findings emerged from this study. First, children conceptualized God as more humanlike than their (...)
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  49.  15
    Deluding the Motor System.Blakemore S.-J. - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):647-655.
    How do we know that our own actions belong to us? How are we able to distinguish self-generated sensory events from those that arise externally? In this paper, I will briefly discuss experiments that were designed to investigate these questions. In particularly, I will review psychophysical and neuroimaging studies that have investigated how we recognise the consequences of our own actions, and why patients with delusions of control confuse self-produced and externally produced actions and sensations. Studies investigating the failure of (...)
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  50.  11
    Levinas, Løgstrup, and the Idea of Command.Michael L. Morgan - 2020 - The Monist 103 (1):63-82.
    Robert Stern has argued that Levinas is a kind of command theorist and that, for this reason, Løgstrup can be understood to have provided an argument against Levinas. In this paper, I discuss Levinas’s use of the vocabulary of demand, order, and command in the light of Jewish philosophical accounts of such notions in the work of Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, and Emil Fackenheim. These accounts revise the traditional Jewish idea of command and I show that Levinas’s use of this (...)
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