Results for 'Reflections on Ian Hacking'

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  1. Natural Kinds: Rosy Dawn, Scholastic Twilight: Ian Hacking.Ian Hacking - 2007 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 61:203-239.
    The rosy dawn of my title refers to that optimistic time when the logical concept of a natural kind originated in Victorian England. The scholastic twilight refers to the present state of affairs. I devote more space to dawn than twilight, because one basic problem was there from the start, and by now those origins have been forgotten. Philosophers have learned many things about classification from the tradition of natural kinds. But now it is in disarray and is unlikely to (...)
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  2. Bunge and Hacking on Constructivism.Ian Hacking - 2001 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (3):424-453.
     
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  3.  10
    The Clinical View Versus the Narrative View Individuals with Autism Are Very Much in the Public Eye. These Days, Anyone Versed in the Comings and Goings of Everyday Culture Will Have Heard of Autism (and/or Asperger Syndrome) 1—and Doubtless Knows Something About It. Misconceptions Also Abound. But Given That Autism. [REVIEW]Reflections on Ian Hacking & Victoria Mcgeer - 2010 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
  4. 19 Language, Truth and Reason Ian Hacking.Ian Hacking - 1998 - In Alcoff Linda (ed.), Epistemology: The Big Questions. Blackwell. pp. 322.
     
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  5.  13
    A Conversation with Carole Pateman: Reflections on Democratic Participation, The Sexual Contract, and Power Structures.Steve On - 2012 - In Gary Browning (ed.), Dialogues with Contemporary Political Theorists. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 139.
  6. The Philosophical I: Personal Reflections on Life in Philosophy.Nicholas Rescher, Richard Shusterman, Linda Martín Alcoff, Lorraine Code, Sandra Harding, Bat-Ami Bar On, John Lachs, John J. Stuhr, Douglas Kellner, Thomas E. Wartenberg, Paul C. Taylor, Nancey Murphy, Charles W. Mills, Nancy Tuana & Joseph Margolis - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophy is shaped by life and life is shaped by philosophy. This is reflected in The Philosophical I, a collection of 16 autobiographical essays by prominent philosophers.
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  7.  63
    The Thought and Talk of Individuals with Autism: Reflections on Ian Hacking.Victoria Mcgeer - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):517-530.
  8.  27
    On the Very Idea of Social Construction: Deconstructing Searle’s and Hacking’s Critical Reflections.Martin Endreß - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (1):127-146.
    The starting point of the following inquiry addresses John Searle’s and Ian Hacking’s most prominent critique of contemporary “constructionism” in the 1990s. It is stimulated by the astonishing fact that neither Hacking nor Searle take into account Peter Berger’s and Thomas Luckmann’s classical essay and sociological masterpiece The Social Construction of Reality in their contributions. Critically revisiting Searle’s and Hacking’s critique on the so-called constructivist approach, the article demonstrates that both authors have failed to put forth a (...)
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  9.  39
    On Ian Hacking’s Notion of Style of Reasoning.Luca Sciortino - 2016 - Erkenntnis:1-22.
    The analytical notion of ‘scientific style of reasoning’, introduced by Ian Hacking in the middle of the 1980s, has become widespread in the literature of the history and philosophy of science. However, scholars have rarely made explicit the philosophical assumptions and the research objectives underlying the notion of style: what are its philosophical roots? How does the notion of style fit into the area of research of historical epistemology? What does a comparison between Hacking’s project on styles of (...)
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  10.  31
    On Ian Hacking’s Notion of Style of Reasoning.Luca Sciortino - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (2):243-264.
    The analytical notion of ‘scientific style of reasoning’, introduced by Ian Hacking in the middle of the 1980s, has become widespread in the literature of the history and philosophy of science. However, scholars have rarely made explicit the philosophical assumptions and the research objectives underlying the notion of style: what are its philosophical roots? How does the notion of style fit into the area of research of historical epistemology? What does a comparison between the Hacking’s project on styles (...)
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  11.  83
    Metaphysical Deja Vu: Hacking and Latour on Science Studies and Metaphysics - the Social Construction of What? Ian Hacking; Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass. And London, England, 1999, Pp. X+261, Price £18.50 Hardback, ISBN 0-674-81200-X.Pandora's Hope: Essays on the Reality of Science Studies Bruno Latour; Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass. And London, England, 1999, Pp. X+324, Price £12.50, $19.95 Paperback, ISBN 0-67-465336-X, £27.95, $45.00 Hardback, ISBN 0-67-465335-. [REVIEW]M. Kusch - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (3):639-647.
    Ian Hacking, Hacking and Latour on science studies and metaphysics: The Social Construction of What?Harvard University Press, ISBN 0-674-81200-X Bruno Latour, Pandora's Hope: Essays on the Reality of Science StudiesHarvard University Press, ISBN0-67-465336-X.
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  12. Review Symposium on Ian Hacking : Narrative Hooks and Paper Trails: The Writing of Memory.Michael Lynch - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (4):118-130.
  13. Review Symposium on Ian Hacking : Ian Hacking, Rewriting the Soul. Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995, £19.95, Pp. Ix + 336. [REVIEW]Peter Barham - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (4):107-113.
  14. Review Symposium on Ian Hacking : The Ethics of Indeterminacy.Thomas Osborne - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (4):113-117.
  15.  9
    Reflections on Trees of Knowledge.Marion Blute - 2009 - Spontaneous Generations 3 (1):223-225.
    On September 30th I attended a talk by Ian Hacking, the renowned philosopher of science. The topic, “The Tree of Knowledge,” was irresistible for someone like myself whose main interest is in sociocultural evolution. I was rewarded with a dazzling display of erudition about stylized trees drawn through history and across civilizations. Hacking generously credited the many experts he had consulted to amass this treasure. This was consistent with his preference for “collaborating disciplines” over interdisciplinarity.
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  16.  18
    Faith and Reason: Reflections on Macintyre's ‘Tradition-Constituted Enquiry’: Ian Markham.Ian Markham - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (2):259-267.
    The problem at the heart of the faith/reason relationship can be set out as follows. Faith implies total commitment whilst reason requires a certain detachment. One cannot be totally committed yet rationally detached at the same time. Therefore faith and reason are two mutually exclusive approaches to religion. Alasdair MacIntyre in Whose Justice? Which Rationality? has offered a very interesting perspective on this problem. He has argued, albeit indirectly, that this faith/reason question is a modern problem generated by a certain (...)
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  17. Roy Bhaskar and Ian Hacking. The Problem of Scientific Realism in the Light of Philosophical Reflection on the Laboratory.Marek Sikora - 2015 - Filozofia Nauki 23 (1):27-38.
  18.  19
    Foucauldian Imprints in the Early Works of Ian Hacking.María Laura Martínez - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):69-84.
    Ian Hacking has defined himself as a philosopher in the analytic tradition. However, he has also recognized the profound influence that Michel Foucault had on much of his work. In this article I analyse the specific imprint of certain works by Foucault—in particular Les mots et les choses—in two of Hacking’s early works: Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy? and The Emergence of Probability. I propose that these texts not only share a debt of Foucauldian thought, but also (...)
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  19.  28
    Two Uses of Michel Foucault in Political Theory: Concepts and Methods in Giorgio Agamben and Ian Hacking.Colin Koopman - 2015 - Constellations 22 (4):571-585.
    This deep presence of Foucault’s influence across contemporary theoretical landscapes signals a need for self-reflectiveness that has largely (though not entirely) been missing in contemporary uses of Foucault. While scholarship in a Foucauldian vein is obviously alive and well, scholarship on Foucauldian methodology is not. This paper develops a distinction between two methodological features of Foucault’s work that deserve to be disentangled: I parse the methods (e.g., genealogy, archaeology) and concepts (e.g., discipline, biopower) featured in Foucault’s texts. Following this, I (...)
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  20.  96
    Reinventing Certainty: The Significance of Ian Hacking's Realism.Alan G. Gross - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:421 - 431.
    This paper examines Ian Hacking's arguments in favor of entity realism. It shows that his examples from science do not support his realism. Furthermore, his proposed criterion of experimental use is neither sufficient nor necessary for conferring a privileged status on his preferred unobservables. Nonetheless his insight is genuine; it may be most profitably seen as part of a more general effort to create a space for a new form of scientific and philosophical certainty, one that does not require (...)
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  21.  53
    The Role of Skill in Experimentation: Reading Ludwik Fleck's Study of the Wasserman Reaction as an Example of Ian Hacking's Experimental Realism.David Stump - 1988 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:302 - 308.
    While Ludwik Fleck's Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact is mainly concerned with social elements in science, a central argument depends on his case study of the development of a serum test for syphilis, the Wasserman Reaction, which Fleck argues was the product of skill and of laboratory practice, not a simple discovery. Ian Hacking interprets the creation of new phenomena in science very differently, arguing that it can seen as an argument for scientific realism. Hacking's argument (...)
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  22. Hacking on the Looping Effects of Psychiatric Classifications: What is an Interactive and Indifferent Kind?Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2007 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21 (3):329 – 344.
    This paper examines Ian Hacking's analysis of the looping effects of psychiatric classifications, focusing on his recent account of interactive and indifferent kinds. After explicating Hacking's distinction between 'interactive kinds' (human kinds) and 'indifferent kinds' (natural kinds), I argue that Hacking cannot claim that there are 'interactive and indifferent kinds,' given the way that he introduces the interactive-indifferent distinction. Hacking is also ambiguous on whether his notion of interactive and indifferent kinds is supposed to offer an (...)
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  23. On the Very Idea of a Style of Reasoning.Alexandra Bradner - unknown
    Although Ian Hacking’s meta-concept is frequently applied to historical cases, few theorists have questioned the very idea of a style of reasoning. Hacking himself considers Donald Davidson’s conceptual scheme argument to be the most formidable challenge to the style idea, but Hacking has set up a straw man in Davidson. Beyond Hacking’s own conclusion, that Davidson's narrow concern with meaning incommensurability does not apply to styles, which are not incommensurable in that way, there is the more (...)
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  24.  65
    Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science Ian Hacking Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983. 287 P. [REVIEW]Yvon Gauthier - 1985 - Dialogue 24 (1):162-.
    This is a lively and clearly written introduction to the philosophy of natural science, organized around the central theme of scientific realism. It has two parts. 'Representing' deals with the different philosophical accounts of scientific objectivity and the reality of scientific entities. The views of Kuhn, Feyerabend, Lakatos, Putnam, van Fraassen, and others, are all considered. 'Intervening' presents the first sustained treatment of experimental science for many years and uses it to give a new direction to debates about realism. (...) illustrates how experimentation often has a life independent of theory. He argues that although the philosophical problems of scientific realism can not be resolved when put in terms of theory alone, a sound philosophy of experiment provides compelling grounds for a realistic attitude. A great many scientific examples are described in both parts of the book, which also includes lucid expositions of recent high energy physics and a remarkable chapter on the microscope in cell biology. (shrink)
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  25.  43
    Pathologies Revisited: Reflections on Our Critics.Donald P. Green & Ian Shapiro - 1995 - Critical Review 9 (1-2):235-276.
    More than three decades after its advent in political science, rational choice theory has yet to add appreciably to the stock of knowledge about politics. In Pathologies of Rational Choice Theory we traced this failure to methodological defects rooted in the aspiration to come up with universal theories of politics. After responding to criticisms of our argument, we elaborate on our earlier recommendations about how to improve the quality of rational choice applications. Building on suggestions of contributors to this volume, (...)
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  26.  42
    Ontología histórica Y nominalismo dinámico: La propuesta de Ian Hacking para las ciencias humanas.María Laura Martínez - 2010 - Cinta de Moebio 39:130-141.
    En los últimos años Ian Hacking se ha dedicado a trabajar principalmente acerca de las ciencias humanas. El objetivo de este artículo es presentar algunas de las nociones acuñadas por el filósofo canadiense -fundamentalmente las de ontología histórica y nominalismo dinámico- para dicho ámbito. A par..
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  27. A Note on the Dynamics of Psychiatric Classification.José Eduardo Porcher - 2014 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):27-47.
    The question of how psychiatric classifications are made up and to what they refer has attracted the attention of philosophers in recent years. In this paper, I review the claims of authors who discuss psychiatric classification in terms referring both to the philosophical tradition of natural kinds and to the sociological tradition of social constructionism — especially those of Ian Hacking and his critics. I examine both the ontological and the social aspects of what it means for something to (...)
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  28.  29
    Historical Reflections on the Ascendancy of ADHD in North America, C. 1980 - C. 2005.Paul Neufeld & Michael Foy - 2006 - British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (4):449 - 470.
    An ecological niche framework (Hacking, 1998) is utilised to examine the growth of ADHD in North America. The analysis suggests ADHD flourishes, at least in part, due to a complex and historically situated interaction of factors that created a niche within which a particular kind of explanation and treatment for the troubling behaviours of children can and does thrive.
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  29. Experimenting with Islam: Nietzschean Reflections on Bowles's Araplaina.Ian Almond - 2004 - Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):309-323.
  30.  7
    Pathologies Revisited: Reflections on Our Critics.Ian Shapiro & Donald P. Green - 2017 - In Louis Putterman (ed.), The Rational Choice Controversy. Yale University Press. pp. 235-276.
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  31.  32
    Reflections on Skinner and Pettit.Ian Shapiro - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (2):185-191.
    This article discusses the concepts of freedom and liberty that Skinner and Pettit identify in Hobbes, and takes issue with them.
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  32.  9
    Some Reflections on Golby and Governors.Ian Gregory - 1994 - Philosophy of Education 28 (2):205-210.
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  33.  3
    Practical Theology as ‘Healing of Memories’: Critical Reflections on a Specific Methodology.Ian A. Nell - 2011 - Hts Theological Studies 67 (2).
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  34.  11
    Hacking Kuhn.Mauricio Suárez - 2003 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 28 (2):261-284.
    Thomas Kuhn’s work, particularly his famous book Structure of Scientific Revolutions, is often interpreted as a failed attempt to defend four radical thesis about science: epistemic pessimism, semantic relativism, methodological irrationalism and metaphysical idealism. In this paper I argue that such interpretation depends essentially on a false model of scientific knowledge, according to which the objects of scientific belief are always explanatory scientific theories, which are in turn empirically confirmed by means of a direct comparison with observable data and facts. (...)
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  35. Reflections on Externalism and Self-Knowledge.Ian Phillips - manuscript
    In the mid-nineties a large number of philosophers (most famously, Michael McKinsey, Jessica Brown and Paul Boghossian) raised and discussed a certain form of challenge to externalism. In Boghossian.
     
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  36.  14
    Some Reflections on Golby and Governors.Ian Gregory - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (2):205–210.
  37.  14
    Reflections on the Scientific Revolution (1543–1687).Owen Gingerich - 2010 - In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 603--617.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * Aristotle’s Errors * The Myth of the Flat Earth * The Copernican Transformation * The Tychonian Transition * The “Universe Based on Causes” of Johannes Kepler * Galileo and the Telescope * Newton, the Ultimate Unifier * Note.
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  38. Reflections on Meaning.Paul Horwich - 2005 - Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.
    Paul Horwich's main aim in Reflections on Meaning is to explain how mere noises, marks, gestures, and mental symbols are able to capture the world--that is, how words and sentences (in whatever medium) come to mean what they do, to stand for certain things, to be true or false of reality. His answer is a groundbreaking development of Wittgenstein's idea that the meaning of a term is nothing more than its use. While the chapters here have appeared as individual (...)
  39.  61
    Natural Kinds in Philosophy and in the Life Sciences: Scholastic Twilight or New Dawn? [REVIEW]Miles MacLeod & Thomas A. C. Reydon - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (2):89-99.
    This article, which is intended both as a position paper in the philosophical debate on natural kinds and as the guest editorial to this thematic issue, takes up the challenge posed by Ian Hacking in his paper, “Natural Kinds: Rosy Dawn, Scholastic Twilight.” Whereas a straightforward interpretation of that paper suggests that according to Hacking the concept of natural kinds should be abandoned, both in the philosophy of science and in philosophy more generally, we suggest that an alternative (...)
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  40. Feminism and Foucault: Reflections on Resistance.Irene Diamond, Lee Quinby, Seyla Benhabib & Drucilla Cornell - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):118-124.
    This essay is a critical review of two recent collections, Feminism and Foucault: Reflections on Resistance, edited by Irene Diamond and Lee Quinby and Feminism as Critique: On the Politics of Gender, edited by Seyla Benhabib and Drucilla Cornell. While the collections differ in their manner of addressing the critical sources that have inspired them-the former relying upon a single theorist, the latter attempting to move through some of the philosophical history that constitutes our present theoretical terrain-both attempt to (...)
     
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  41. The Objectivity of Local Knowledge. Lessons From Ethnobiology.David Ludwig - 2017 - Synthese 194 (12):4705-4720.
    This article develops an account of local epistemic practices on the basis of case studies from ethnobiology. I argue that current debates about objectivity often stand in the way of a more adequate understanding of local knowledge and ethnobiological practices in general. While local knowledge about the biological world often meets criteria for objectivity in philosophy of science, general debates about the objectivity of local knowledge can also obscure their unique epistemic features. In modification of Ian Hacking’s suggestion to (...)
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  42.  11
    From Microscopes to Optogenetics: Ian Hacking Vindicated.John Bickle - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (5):1065-1077.
    I introduce two new tools in experimental neurobiology, optogenetics and DREADDs. These tools permit unprecedented control over activity in specific neurons in behaving animals. In addition to their inherent scientific interest, these tools make an important contribution to philosophy of science. They illustrate the very premises of Ian Hacking’s “microscope” argument for the relative independence of experiment from theory. This new example is important for generalizing Hacking’s argument because the background sciences and the fields of engineering producing these (...)
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  43. Reflections on the Revolution at Stanford.F. A. Muller - 2011 - Synthese 183 (1):87-114.
    We inquire into the question whether the Aristotelean or classical \emph{ideal} of science has been realised by the Model Revolution, initiated at Stanford University during the 1950ies and spread all around the world of philosophy of science --- \emph{salute} P.\ Suppes. The guiding principle of the Model Revolution is: \emph{a scientific theory is a set of structures in the domain of discourse of axiomatic set-theory}, characterised by a set-theoretical predicate. We expound some critical reflections on the Model Revolution; the (...)
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  44. Dasein, The Early Years: Heideggerian Reflections on Childhood.Lawrence J. Hatab - 2014 - International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (4):379-391.
    Like most philosophers, Heidegger gave little attention to childhood, but his philosophical emphasis on pre-reflective practice and understanding seems uniquely qualified to help make sense of a child’s experience and development. Moreover, it seems to me that many central Heideggerian concepts are best defended, exemplified, and articulated by bringing child development into the discussion. A Heideggerain emphasis on pre-theoretical world-involvement opens up a rich array of phenomena for studying child development, which can improve upon standard theories that have over-emphasized exclusive (...)
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  45.  31
    Scientific Styles, Plain Truth, and Truthfulness.Robert Kowalenko - 2018 - South African Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):361-378.
    Ian Hacking defines a “style of scientific thinking” loosely as a “way to find things out about the world” characterised by five hallmark features of a number of scientific template styles. Most prominently, these are autonomy and “self-authentication”: a scientific style of thinking, according to Hacking, is not good because it helps us find out the truth in some domain, it itself defines the criteria for truth-telling in its domain. I argue that Renaissance medicine, Mediaeval “demonology”, and magical (...)
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  46. Interactive Classification and Practice in the Social Sciences.Matt L. Drabek - 2010 - Poroi 6 (2):62-80.
    This paper examines the ways in which social scientific discourse and classification interact with the objects of social scientific investigation. I examine this interaction in the context of the traditional philosophical project of demarcating the social sciences from the natural sciences. I begin by reviewing Ian Hacking’s work on interactive classification and argue that there are additional forms of interaction that must be treated.
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  47. Reference, Success and Entity Realism.Howard Sankey - 2012 - Kairos 5:31-42.
    The paper discusses the version of entity realism presented by Ian Hacking in his book, Representing and Intervening. Hacking holds that an ontological form of scientific realism, entity realism, may be defended on the basis of experimental practices which involve the manipulation of unobservable entities. There is much to be said in favour of the entity realist position that Hacking defends, especially the pragmatist orientation of his approach to realism. But there are problems with the position. The (...)
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  48.  47
    The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion.Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological (...) on these accounts follow, offered by leading philosophers, theologians, and scientists. This diverse group of scholars address some fascinating underlying questions: Do scientific accounts of religion undermine the justification of religious belief? Do such accounts show religion to be an accidental by-product of our evolutionary development? And, whilst we seem naturally disposed toward religion, would we fare better or worse without it? Bringing together dissenting perspectives, this provocative collection will serve to freshly illuminate ongoing debate on these perennial questions. (shrink)
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  49. Becoming Undone: Darwinian Reflections on Life, Politics, and Art.E. A. Grosz - 2011 - Duke University Press.
    The inhuman in the humanities : Darwin and the ends of man -- Deleuze, Bergson, and the concept of life -- Bergson, Deleuze, and difference -- Feminism, materialism, and freedom -- The future of feminist theory : dreams for new knowledges -- Differences disturbing identity : Deleuze and feminism -- Irigaray and the ontology of sexual difference -- Darwin and the split between natural and sexual selection -- Sexual difference as sexual selection : Irigarayan reflections on Darwin -- Art (...)
     
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  50.  13
    Reflections on a Revolution at Stanford.F. A. Muller - unknown
    We inquire into the question whether the Aristotelean or classical \emph{ideal} of science has been realised by the Model Revolution, initiated at Stanford University during the 1950ies and spread all around the world of philosophy of science --- \emph{salute} P.\ Suppes. The guiding principle of the Model Revolution is: \emph{a scientific theory is a set of structures in the domain of discourse of axiomatic set-theory}, characterised by a set-theoretical predicate. We expound some critical reflections on the Model Revolution; the (...)
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