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  1.  52
    From Psychologism to Personhood: Honneth, Recognition, and the Making of Persons.Renante D. Pilapil - 2012 - Res Publica 18 (1):39-51.
    The paper explores the philosophical anthropology and the moral grammar of recognition. It does so by examining how the formation of the self is informed by social recognition, the result of which can motivate individuals and groups to engage in struggles for recognition. To pursue this task, the discussion focuses on the insights of Honneth, who grounds his theory of recognition in the intersubjective relations between persons. The idea that recognition impacts the formation of personal identity is regarded as susceptible (...)
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  2.  20
    From Institutions to Persons?: Rawls and the Subject of Justice.Renante D. Pilapil - 2018 - Journal of Human Values 24 (3):166-173.
    This article examines two potential Rawlsian arguments, namely the moral dualism argument and the educative effect of institutions argument as regards the extension of the primary subject of justice to personal conduct. The article makes two claims. First, while moral dualism is a logical step to make, it suffers from a potential conflict between the principles that apply to institutions and those that govern personal conduct. Second, despite the attractive features of the educative effect of institutions argument, an explanative gap (...)
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  3.  21
    Recognition as Redistribution: Rawls, Humiliation and Cultural Injustice.Renante D. Pilapil - 2014 - Critical Horizons 15 (3):284-305.
    This paper aims to explore and examine the implied commitment to the premises of recognition in Rawls’s account of redistributive justice. It attempts to find out whether or not recognition relations that produce humiliation and cultural injustice can be followed to their logical conclusion in his theory of redistribution. This paper makes two claims. Firstly, although Rawls does not disregard the harms of misrecognition as demonstrated in his notion of self-respect being the most important primary good, he cannot liberally accommodate (...)
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  4.  57
    Disrespect and Political Resistance: Honneth and the Theory of Recognition.Renante D. Pilapil - 2013 - Thesis Eleven 114 (1):48-60.
    This article examines the critical potential of Honneth’s theory or ethics of recognition by raising two concerns as regards the success of such a project. Firstly, this article argues that Honneth’s ethical turn in critical theory might not be completely warranted and that there are good reasons to supplement his theory of recognition with an account of justificatory practices. Secondly, it argues that the complexity of the beginnings of political resistance proves that an explanative gap remains to be filled to (...)
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  5.  9
    Beyond Redistribution: Honneth, Recognition Theory and Global Justice.Renante D. Pilapil - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):34-48.
    ABSTRACTThis paper attempts to explore the ways through which the discourse on global justice can be expanded beyond the language of redistribution by utilizing the insights from the theory of recognition as proposed by Honneth. It looks into the potential contributions of recognition theory in the normative analysis of global poverty and inequality. Taking off from the argument that the focus on global redistributive justice is misleading, the paper makes three claims: firstly, any global justice discourse must take as its (...)
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