Results for 'Research ethics'

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  1.  94
    Rethinking Research Ethics.Rosamond Rhodes - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):7 – 28.
    Contemporary research ethics policies started with reflection on the atrocities perpetrated upoconcentration camp inmates by Nazi doctors. Apparently, as a consequence of that experience, the policies that now guide human subject research focus on the protection of human subjects by making informed consent the centerpiece of regulatory attention. I take the choice of context for policy design, the initial prioritization of informed consent, and several associated conceptual missteps, to have set research ethics off in the (...)
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  2.  17
    Rethinking Research Ethics.Rosamond Rhodes - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (10):19-36.
    Contemporary research ethics policies started with reflection on the atrocities perpetrated upon concentration camp inmates by Nazi doctors. Apparently, as a consequence of that experience, the policies that now guide human subject research focus on the protection of human subjects by making informed consent the centerpiece of regulatory attention. I take the choice of context for policy design, the initial prioritization of informed consent, and several associated conceptual missteps, to have set research ethics off in (...)
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  3. Guidelines for Research Ethics in Science and Technology.National Committee for Research Ethics in Science & Technology - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).
     
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  4.  9
    Mapping Research Ethics Committees in Africa: Evidence of the Growth of Ethics Review of Health Research in Africa.Boitumelo Mokgatla, Carel IJsselmuiden, Doug Wassenaar & Mary Kasule - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (4):341-348.
    Health research initiatives worldwide are growing in scope and complexity, particularly as they move into the developing world. Expanding health research activity in low- and middle-income countries has resulted in a commensurate rise in the need for sound ethical review structures and functions in the form of Research Ethics Committees. The urgent need for continued capacity development in Africa has necessitated research initiatives to identify existing capacity. This discussion paper describes the mapping of RECs in (...)
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  5.  21
    Research Ethics Education in Post-Graduate Medical Curricula in I.R. Iran.Nazila Nikravanfard, Faezeh Khorasanizadeh & Kazem Zendehdel - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (2):77-83.
    Research ethics training during post-graduate education is necessary to improve ethical standards in the design and conduct of biomedical research. We studied quality and quantity of research ethics training in the curricula of post-graduate programs in the medical science in I.R. Iran. We evaluated curricula of 125 post-graduate programs in medical sciences in I.R. Iran. We qualitatively studied the curricula by education level, including the Master and PhD degrees and analyzed the contents and the amount (...)
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  6.  69
    Health Research Ethics Committees in South Africa 12 Years Into Democracy.Myer Landon & Moodley Keymanthri - 2007 - BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):1-8.
    Background Despite the growth of biomedical research in South Africa, there are few insights into the operation of Research Ethics Committees (RECs) in this setting. We investigated the composition, operations and training needs of health RECs in South Africa against the backdrop of national and international guidelines. Methods The 12 major health RECs in South Africa were surveyed using semi-structured questionnaires that investigated the composition and functions of each REC as well as the operational issues facing committees. (...)
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  7.  26
    Internet Research Ethics and the Institutional Review Board: Current Practices and Issues.Elizabeth A. Buchanan & Charles M. Ess - 2009 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 39 (3):43-49.
    The Internet has been used as a place for and site of an array of research activities. From online ethnographies to public data sets and online surveys, researchers and research regulators have struggled with an array of ethical issues around the conduct of online research. This paper presents a discussion and findings from Buchanan and Ess's study on US-based institutional review boards and the state of internet research ethics.
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  8.  4
    Research Ethics and Justice: The Case of Finland.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (3):551-576.
    :This paper explores how Finnish research ethics deals with matters of justice on the levels of practical regulation, political morality, and theoretical studies. The bioethical sets of principles introduced by Tom Beauchamp and James Childress in the United States and Jacob Dahl Rendtorff and Peter Kemp in Europe provide the conceptual background, together with a recently introduced conceptual map of theories of justice and their dimensions. The most striking finding is that the internationally recognized requirement of informed consent (...)
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  9.  33
    Polish Research Ethics Committees in the European Union System of Assessing Medical Experiments.Marek Czarkowski & Krzysztof Różanowski - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):201-212.
    The Polish equivalents of Research Ethics Committees are Bioethics Committees (BCs). A questionnaire study has been undertaken to determine their situation. The BC is usually comprised of 13 members. Nine of these are doctors and four are non-doctors. In 2006 BCs assessed an average of 27.3 ± 31.7 (range: 0–131) projects of clinical trials and 71.1 ± 139.8 (range: 0–638) projects of other types of medical research. During one BC meeting an average of 10.3 ± 14.7 (range: (...)
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  10.  27
    Do Research Ethics Committees Identify Process Errors in Applications for Ethical Approval?E. Angell & M. Dixon-Woods - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):130-132.
    We analysed research ethics committee (REC) letters. We found that RECs frequently identify process errors in applications from researchers that are not deemed “favourable” at first review. Errors include procedural violations (identified in 74% of all applications), missing information (68%), slip-ups (44%) and discrepancies (25%). Important questions arise about why the level of error identified by RECs is so high, and about how errors of different types should be handled.
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  11.  38
    Teaching Research Ethics: Can Web-Based Instruction Satisfy Appropriate Pedagogical Objectives? [REVIEW]Brian Schrag - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):347-366.
    Ethical tasks faced by researchers in science and engineering as they engage in research include recognition of moral problems in their practice, finding solutions to those moral problems, judging moral actions and engaging in preventive ethics. Given these issues, appropriate pedagogical objectives for research ethics education include (1) teaching researchers to recognize moral issues in their research, (2) teaching researchers to solve practical moral problems in their research from the perspective of the moral agent, (...)
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  12.  46
    Enhancing Research Ethics Review Systems in Egypt: The Focus of an International Training Program Informed by an Ecological Developmental Approach to Enhancing Research Ethics Capacity.Hillary Anne Edwards, Tamer Hifnawy & Henry Silverman - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):199-207.
    Recently, training programs in research ethics have been established to enhance individual and institutional capacity in research ethics in the developing world. However, commentators have expressed concern that the efforts of these training programs have placed ‘too great an emphasis on guidelines and research ethics review’, which will have limited effect on ensuring ethical conduct in research. What is needed instead is a culture of ethical conduct supported by national and institutional commitment to (...)
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  13.  36
    Research Ethics Governance in Times of Ebola.Doris Schopper, Raffaella Ravinetto, Lisa Schwartz, Eunice Kamaara, Sunita Sheel, Michael J. Segelid, Aasim Ahmad, Angus Dawson, Jerome Singh, Amar Jesani & Ross Upshur - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (1).
    The Médecins Sans Frontières ethics review board has been solicited in an unprecedented way to provide advice and review research protocols in an ‘emergency’ mode during the recent Ebola epidemic. Twenty-seven Ebola-related study protocols were reviewed between March 2014 and August 2015, ranging from epidemiological research, to behavioural research, infectivity studies and clinical trials with investigational products at early development stages. This article examines the MSF ERB’s experience addressing issues related to both the process of review (...)
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  14. Emergency Research Ethics.A. M. Viens (ed.) - 2013 - Ashgate.
    The essays selected for this volume focus on issues that arise when attempting to design, review and undertake research involving human participants who are experiencing a private or public emergency. The main themes discussed by the essays are: the distinctive and significant ethical questions as to how research participants can be treated during emergency settings; the ethical challenges raised by emergencies for researchers undertaking research and its effects on the nature of research pursued; and procedural obstacles (...)
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  15. Six Domains of Research Ethics: A Heuristic Framework for the Responsible Conduct of Research.Kenneth D. Pimple - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):191-205.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a simple yet comprehensive organizing scheme for the responsible conduct of research (RCR). The heuristic offered here should prove helpful in research ethics education, where the many and heterogeneous elements of RCR can be bewildering, as well as research into research integrity and efforts to form RCR policy and regulations. The six domains are scientific integrity, collegiality, protection of human subjects, animal welfare, institutional integrity, and social responsibility.
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  16.  17
    Should Research Ethics Committees Be Told How to Think?G. M. Sayers - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (1):39-42.
    Research ethics committees are charged with providing an opinion on whether research proposals are ethical. These committees are overseen by a central office that acts for the Department of Health and hence the State. An advisory group has recently reported back to the Department of Health, recommending that it should deal with inconsistency in the decisions made by different RECs. This article questions the desirability and feasibility of questing for consistent ethical decisions.
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  17. International Research Ethics Education.J. Millum, B. Sina & R. Glass - 2015 - Journal of the American Medical Association 313 (5):461-62.
    This paper assesses the state of research ethics in low- and middle-income countries and the achievements of the Fogarty International Center's bioethics training program since 2000. The vision of FIC for the next decade of research ethics education is encapsulated in four proposed goals: (1) Ensure sufficient expertise in ethics review by having someone with long-term training on every high-workload REC; (2) Develop LMIC capacity to conduct original research on critical ethical issues by supporting (...)
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  18.  72
    Research Ethics Capacity Development in Africa: Exploring a Model for Individual Success.A. L. I. Joseph, Adnan A. Hyder & Nancy E. Kass - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (2):55-62.
    The Johns Hopkins-Fogarty African Bioethics Training Program (FABTP) has offered a fully-funded, one-year, non-degree training opportunity in research ethics to health professionals, ethics committee members, scholars, journalists and scientists from countries across sub-Saharan Africa. In the first 9 years of operation, 28 trainees from 13 African countries have trained with FABTP. Any capacity building investment requires periodic critical evaluation of the impact that training dollars produce. In this paper we describe and evaluate FABTP and the efforts of (...)
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  19.  19
    Research Ethics Committees and Paternalism.S. J. L. Edwards - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):88-91.
    In this paper the authors argue that research ethics committees should not be paternalistic by rejecting research that poses risk to people competent to decide for themselves. However it is important they help to ensure valid consent is sought from potential recruits and protect vulnerable people who cannot look after their own best interests. The authors first describe the tragic deaths of Jesse Gelsinger and Ellen Roche. They then discuss the following claims to support their case: competent (...)
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  20.  71
    Research Ethics and International Epidemic Response: The Case of Ebola and Marburg Hemorrhagic Fevers.Philippe Calain, Nathalie Fiore, Marc Poncin & Samia A. Hurst - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):7-29.
    Institute for Biomedical Ethics, Geneva University Medical School * Corresponding author: Médecins Sans Frontières (OCG), rue de Lausanne 78, CH-1211 Geneva 21, Switzerland. Tel.: +41 (0)22 849 89 29; Fax: +41 (0)22 849 84 88; Email: philippe_calain{at}hotmail.com ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Outbreaks of filovirus (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fevers in Africa are typically the theater of rescue activities involving international experts and agencies tasked with reinforcing national authorities in clinical management, biological diagnosis, (...)
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  21. Helping Research Ethics Committees Share Their Experience, Learn From Review and Develop Consensus: An Observational Study of the UK Shared Ethical Debate.Peter Heasman, Alain Gregoire & Hugh Davies - 2011 - Research Ethics 7 (1):13-18.
    This project is based on the unique ‘Shared ethical debate’ between NHS RECs in the UK in which one research application is reviewed by several research ethics committees. This programme is now in its 6th cycle. In the fifth cycle a prison- based research project was reviewed by each of three NHS RECs that are ‘ flagged’ for such research and their debate and discussions were observed directly by one researcher who recorded the committee processes (...)
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  22. Research Ethics and Misguided Moral Intuition.Franklin G. Miller - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):111-116.
    The term therapeutic misconception was coined by Paul Appelbaum and his colleagues to describe the tendency of patients enrolled in clinical trials to confuse research participation with the personal clinical attention characteristic of medical care. It has not been recognized that an analogous therapeutic misconception pervades ethical thinking about clinical research with patient-subjects. Investigators and bioethicists often judge the ethics of clinical research based on ethical standards appropriate to the physician-patient relationship in therapeutic medicine. This ethical (...)
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  23.  32
    How Research Ethics Boards Are Undermining Survey Research on Canadian University Students.J. Paul Grayson & Richard Myles - 2005 - Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (4):293-314.
    In Canada, all research conducted by individuals associated with universities must be subjected to review by research ethics boards (REB). Unfortunately, decisions reached by REBs may seriously compromise the integrity of university-based research. In this paper attention will focus on how requirements of REBs and a legal department in four Canadian universities affected response rates to a survey of domestic and international students. It will be shown that in universities in which students were sent a legalistic (...)
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  24.  35
    Research Ethics in Japanese Higher Education: Faculty Attitudes and Cultural Mediation. [REVIEW]Bruce Macfarlane & Yoshiko Saitoh - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (3):181-195.
    Principles of research ethics, derived largely from Western philosophical thought, are spreading across the world of higher education. Since 2006 the Japanese Ministry of Education has required universities in Japan to establish codes of ethical conduct and ensure that procedures are in place to punish research misconduct. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 13 academics in a research-intensive university in Japan, this paper considers how research ethics is interpreted in relation to their own practice. Interviewees (...)
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  25.  4
    Beyond Research Ethics: Dialogues in Neuro-ICT Research.Bernd Carsten Stahl, Simisola Akintoye, B. Tyr Fothergill, Manuel Guerrero, Will Knight & Inga Ulnicane - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  26. Human Research Ethics Committees in Technical Universities.David Koepsell, Willem-Paul Brinkman & Sylvia Pont - 2014 - Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics 9 (3):67-73.
    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although mandated in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, non-medical research involving humans need not receive ethics review in much of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Our survey (...)
     
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  27.  6
    Research Ethics Committees in Europe: Implementing the Directive, Respecting Diversity.A. Hedgecoe - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):483-486.
    With the recent Clinical Trials Directive, a degree of harmonisation into research ethics committees across Europe, including the time taken to assess a trial proposal and the kinds of issues a committee should take into account, has been introduced by the European Union . How four different member states—Hungary, Portugal, Sweden and the UK—have chosen to implement the directive is shown. Although this has resulted in four very different ways of structuring RECs, similar themes are present in all (...)
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  28.  17
    Research Ethics Committees: The Role of Ethics in a Regulatory Authority.S. McGuinness - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):695-700.
    This paper is an examination of how research ethics committees have evolved from being advisory committees to more formal regulatory authorities. It is argued that the role of ethics committees should be broader than simple ethical review. Inconsistency in outcome should not be taken to signal failure. Procedural fairness is of the utmost importance. Nor should ethics committees be seen to diminish the ethical responsibilities of researchers themselves.
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  29.  12
    Research Ethics in the Securitised University.Liam F. Gearon & Scott Parsons - 2019 - Journal of Academic Ethics 17 (1):73-93.
    Addressing the complex and longstanding relationship between universities and security and intelligence agencies, this article provides a tentative, working conceptual framework for research ethics in a global higher education environment. The article does so in the light of intensified threats of international terrorism which have brought this historic relationship to the contemporary foreground of academic life. Seeing higher education environments as part of a broader process of enhanced security in societies worldwide, we use securitization theory to provide an (...)
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  30.  21
    Research Ethics Committees: Differences and Moral Judgement.Sarah J. L. Edwards, Richard Ashcroft & Simon Kirchin - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (5):408–427.
  31.  26
    Research Ethics Committee Audit: Differences Between Committees.M. E. Redshaw, A. Harris & J. D. Baum - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (2):78-82.
    The same research proposal was submitted to 24 district health authority (DHA) research ethics committees in different parts of the country. The objective was to obtain permission for a multi-centre research project. The study of neonatal care in different types of unit (regional, subregional and district), required that four health authorities were approached in each of six widely separated health regions in England. Data were collected and compared concerning aspects of processing, including application forms, information required, (...)
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  32.  11
    Should Research Ethics Committees Meet in Public?M. Sheehan - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (8):631-635.
    Currently, research ethics committees in the UK meet behind closed doors—their workings and most of the content of their decisions are unavailable to the general public. There is a significant tension between this current practice and a broader societal presumption of openness. As a form of public institution, the REC system exists to oversee research from the perspective of society generally.An important part of this tension turns on the kind of justification that might be offered for the (...)
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  33.  21
    Research Ethics: Researchers Consider How Best to Prevent Misconduct in Research in Malaysian Higher Learning Institutions Through Ethics Education.Angelina Patrick Olesen, Latifah Amin & Zurina Mahadi - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (4):1111-1124.
    The purpose of this study is to encourage and highlight discussion on how to improve the teaching of research ethics in institutions of higher education in Malaysia. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 21 academics in a research-intensive university in Malaysia, interviewees agreed on the importance of emphasizing the subject of research ethics among students, as well as academics or researchers. This study reveals that participants felt that there is an urgent need to improve the current (...)
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  34.  94
    Vulnerability in Research Ethics: A Way Forward.Margaret Meek Lange, Wendy Rogers & Susan Dodds - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (6):333-340.
    Several foundational documents of bioethics mention the special obligation researchers have to vulnerable research participants. However, the treatment of vulnerability offered by these documents often relies on enumeration of vulnerable groups rather than an analysis of the features that make such groups vulnerable. Recent attempts in the scholarly literature to lend philosophical weight to the concept of vulnerability are offered by Luna and Hurst. Luna suggests that vulnerability is irreducibly contextual and that Institutional Review Boards (Research Ethics (...)
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  35.  43
    Research Ethics Committees: A Regional Approach.Cheryl Cox Macpherson - 1999 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (2):161-179.
    Guidelines for Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) or research ethics committees exist at national and international levels. These guidelines are based on ethical principles and establish an internationally acceptable standard for the review and conduct of medical research. Having attained a multinational consensus about what these fundamental guidelines should be, IRBs are left to interpret the guidelines and devise their own means of implementing them. Individual and community values bear on the interpretation of the guidelines so different IRBs (...)
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  36.  15
    Principles of Animal Research Ethics.Tom L. Beauchamp & David DeGrazia - 2020 - Oup Usa.
    This volume presents a framework of general principles for animal research ethics together with an analysis of the principles' meaning and moral requirements. Tom L. Beauchamp and David DeGrazia's comprehensive framework addresses ethical requirements pertaining to societal benefit and features a thorough, ethically defensible program of animal welfare. The book also features commentaries on the framework of principles by eminent figures in animal research ethics from an array of relevant disciplines: veterinary medicine, biomedical research, biology, (...)
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  37.  31
    Research Ethics in Internet-Enabled Research: Human Subjects Issues and Methodological Myopia. [REVIEW]Joseph B. Walther - 2002 - Ethics and Information Technology 4 (3):205-216.
    As Internet resources are usedmore frequently for research on social andpsychological behavior, concerns grow aboutwhether characteristics of such research affecthuman subjects protections. Early efforts toaddress such concerns have done more toidentify potential problems than to evaluatethem or to seek solutions, leaving bodiescharged with human subjects oversight in aquagmire. This article critiques some of theseissues in light of the US Code of FederalRegulations' policies for the Protection ofHuman Subjects, and argues that some of theissues have no pertinence when examined (...)
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  38.  21
    Research Ethics Review: Social Care and Social Science Research and the Mental Capacity Act 2005.Jonathan Parker, Bridget Penhale & David Stanley - 2011 - Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):380-400.
    This paper considers concerns that social care research may be stifled by health-focused ethical scrutiny under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the requirement for an ?appropriate body? to determine ethical approval for research involving people who are deemed to lack capacity under the Act to make decisions concerning their participation and consent in research. The current study comprised an online survey of current practice in university research ethics committees (URECs), and explored through semi-structured interviews (...)
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  39.  28
    Research Ethics in Dissertations: Ethical Issues and Complexity of Reasoning.S. Kjellstrom, S. N. Ross & B. Fridlund - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (7):425-430.
    Background Conducting ethically sound research is a fundamental principle of scientific inquiry. Recent research has indicated that ethical concerns are insufficiently dealt with in dissertations. Purpose To examine which research ethical topics were addressed and how these were presented in terms of complexity of reasoning in Swedish nurses' dissertations. Methods Analyses of ethical content and complexity of ethical reasoning were performed on 64 Swedish nurses' PhD dissertations dated 2007. Results A total of seven ethical topics were identified: (...)
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  40.  18
    The Emergence of Clinical Research Ethics Consultation: Insights From a National Collaborative.Kathryn M. Porter, Marion Danis, Holly A. Taylor, Mildred K. Cho & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):39-45.
    The increasing complexity of human subjects research and its oversight has prompted researchers, as well as institutional review boards, to have a forum in which to discuss challenging or novel ethical issues not fully addressed by regulations. Research ethics consultation services provide such a forum. In this article, we rely on the experiences of a national Research Ethics Consultation Collaborative that collected more than 350 research ethics consultations in a repository and published 18 (...)
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  41. Review of National Research Ethics Regulations and Guidelines in Middle Eastern Arab Countries. [REVIEW]Ghiath Alahmad, Mohammad Al-Jumah & Kris Dierickx - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):34-.
    Background Research ethics guidelines are essential for conducting medical research. Recently, numerous attempts have been made to establish national clinical research documents in the countries of the Middle East. This article analyzes these documents. Methods Thirteen Arab countries in the Middle East were explored for available national codes, regulations, and guidelines concerning research ethics, and 10 documents from eight countries were found. We studied these documents, considering the ethical principles stated in the Declaration of (...)
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  42.  45
    Research Ethics and Lessons From Hwanggate: What Can We Learn From the Korean Cloning Fraud?R. Saunders & J. Savulescu - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):214-221.
    In this review of the Korean cloning scandal involving Woo-Suk Hwang, the nature of the disaster is documented and reasons why it occurred are suggested. The general problems it raises for scientific research are highlighted and six possible ways of improving practice are offered in the light of this case: better education of science students; independent monitoring and validation; guidelines for tissue donation for research; fostering of debate about ethically contentious research in science journals; development of an (...)
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  43.  31
    Research Ethics Capacity Development in Africa: Exploring a Model for Individual Success.Joseph Ali, Adnan A. Hyder & Nancy E. Kass - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (2):55-62.
    We describe and evaluate FABTP and the efforts of its trainees. Our data show that since 2001, the 28 former FABTP trainees have auth.
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  44.  5
    Assessing Research Ethics Committees in Myanmar: Results of a Self-Assessment Tool.Zaw Zaw Oo, Min Wun, Yin Thet Nu Oo, Kyaw Swa Mya & Henry J. Silverman - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (1):37-49.
    Human subjects research has increased in Myanmar since 2010 and, accordingly, the establishment of research ethics committees has increased review of these research studies. However, characteristics that reflect the operations of RECs in Myanmar have not been assessed. To assess the structures and processes of RECs at medical institutions in Myanmar, we used a self-assessment tool for RECs operating in low- and middle-income countries. This tool consists of the following ten domains: organizational aspects, membership and (...) training, submission arrangements and materials, meeting minutes, policies referring to review procedures, review of specific protocol and informed consent items, communication a decision, continuing review, REC resources and institutional commitment. We distributed this self-administered questionnaire to RECs from 15 medical institutions in Myanmar and one representative from each REC completed this questionnaire and returned it anonymously. We used descriptive, bivariate and multivariate statistics to analyse the data. Out of a maximum 200 points, the total mean score for Myanmar medical institutions was 112.6 ± 12.77, which is lower compared with the aggregate mean score of 137.4 ± 35.8 obtained from RECs in other countries. Domains in which the average percentage score was less than 60% included organizational commitment, membership and ethics training, continuing review and REC resources. Many RECs have a diverse membership and appropriate gender balance but lacked essential policies. The results show that for Myanmar RECs, there is significant room for improvement in their “structures and processes” as well as the extent of institutional commitment. The self-assessment tool proved to be a valuable method to assess the quality of RECs. (shrink)
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  45.  38
    Research Ethics Education in the STEM Disciplines: The Promises and Challenges of a Gaming Approach.Adam Briggle, J. Britt Holbrook, Joseph Oppong, Joesph Hoffmann, Elizabeth K. Larsen & Patrick Pluscht - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):237-250.
    While education in ethics and the responsible conduct of research is widely acknowledged as an essential component of graduate education, particularly in the STEM disciplines, little consensus exists on how best to accomplish this goal. Recent years have witnessed a turn toward the use of games in this context. Drawing from two NSF-funded grants, this paper takes a critical look at the use of games in ethics and RCR education. It does so by: setting the development of (...)
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  46.  8
    Are Research Ethics Guidelines Culturally Competent?Ben Gray, Jo Hilder, Lindsay Macdonald, Rachel Tester, Anthony Dowell & Maria Stubbe - 2017 - Research Ethics 13 (1):23-41.
    Research ethics guidelines grew out of several infamous episodes where research subjects were exploited. There is significant international synchronization of guidelines. However, indigenous groups in New Zealand, Canada and Australia have criticized these guidelines as being inadequate for research involving indigenous people and have developed guidelines from their own cultural perspectives. Whilst traditional research ethics guidelines place a lot of emphasis on informed consent, these indigenous guidelines put much greater emphasis on interdependence and trust. (...)
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  47.  19
    Healthcare Research Ethics and Law: Regulation, Review and Responsibility.Hazel Biggs - 2009 - Routledge-Cavendish.
    The book explores and explains the relationship between law and ethics in the context of medically related research in order to provide a practical guide to understanding for members of research ethics committees (RECs), professionals involved with medical research and those with an academic interest in the subject.
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  48.  59
    Differences in Research Ethics Judgments Between Male and Female Marketing Professionals.Ishmael P. Akaah - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (5):375 - 381.
    s With the unprecedented increase in the number of females holding executive positions in business, there has arisen interest in issues pertaining to the role of women in business organizations, including that of malefemale differences in ethical attitudes/behavior. To add to the research evidence on the issue, this paper examines differences in research ethics judgments between male and female marketing professionals. The results indicate that female marketing professionals evince higher research ethics judgments than their male (...)
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    Canadian Research Ethics Board Members’ Attitudes Toward Benefits From Clinical Trials.Kori Cook, Jeremy Snyder & John Calvert - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundWhile ethicists have for many years called for human subject trial participants and, in some cases, local community members to benefit from participation in pharmaceutical and other intervention-based therapies, little is known about how these discussions are impacting the practice of research ethics boards that grant ethical approval to many of these studies.MethodsTelephone interviews were conducted with 23 REB members from across Canada, a major funder country for human subject research internationally. All interviews were digitally recorded and (...)
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    Rethinking Research Ethics for Latinos: The Policy Paradox of Health Reform and the Role of Social Justice.Lisa Cacari-Stone & Magdalena Avila - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):445-460.
    This article discusses the paradox of exclusion/inclusion: U.S. health policy prohibits Latinos who fall under certain classifications from accessing health services and insurance yet permits them to be human subjects in health research. We aim to advance the discussion of health research ethics post the Tuskegee syphilis experiment in Latinos by (a) tracing the impacts of policy exclusion and the social context of anti-Latino sentiment on Latinos' low participation rates in health research and inequitable access to (...)
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