Results for 'Reviewed by Heidi M. Hurd'

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  1.  27
    Douglas E. Edlin, judges and unjust laws: Common law constitutionalism and the foundations of judicial review.Reviewed by Heidi M. Hurd - 2009 - Ethics 120 (1).
  2.  36
    Paternalism On Pain of Punishment.Heidi M. Hurd - 2009 - Criminal Justice Ethics 28 (1):49-73.
    “We overpunish and overcriminalize,” Douglas Husak insists in his latest book-length tour de force entitled Overcriminalization: The Limits of the Criminal Law.1 In what ways and by what mea...
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  3.  40
    Untying the gordian knot of mens Rea requirements for accomplices.Heidi M. Hurd & Michael S. Moore - 2016 - Social Philosophy and Policy 32 (2):161-183.
    :This essay undertakes two tasks: first, to describe the differing mens rea requirements for accomplice liability of both Anglo-American common law and the American Law Institute's Model Penal Code; and second, to recommend how the mens rea requirements of both of these two sources of criminal law in America should be amended so as to satisfy the goals of clarity and consistency and so as to more closely conform the criminal law to the requirements of moral blameworthiness. Three "pure models" (...)
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  4.  10
    Crimes Against Animals.Heidi M. Hurd - 2019 - In Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Applied Ethics and the Criminal Law. Springer Verlag. pp. 71-93.
    Criminal provisions governing the treatment of animals collectively embody inconsistencies that reflect deep-seated ambivalence about who counts as the victim of animal cruelty, what constitutes the wrong of such cruelty, and what role punishment ought to play in response to it. In the first part, I shall sketch how animal cruelty laws embody tensions and contradictions that make manifest the criminal law’s need for philosophical clarity. In the second part, I shall argue that one way to bring a modicum of (...)
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  5. Living with Genius.Heidi M. Hurd - 2016 - In Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse (eds.), Legal, Moral, and Metaphysical Truths: The Philosophy of Michael S. Moore. Oxford University Press UK.
    This chapter synthesizes Michael Moore’s scholarly opus, organizing the breathtaking array of topics that he has tackled, restating the field-changing theses that he has defended, and extracting a set of common themes that define the essential components of his intellectual legacy. Along the way, it draws upon personal experiences in Michael’s life that may have influenced his scholarly choices. On pain of committing the genetic fallacy, the piece does not purport either to bolster or to debunk any of his claims (...)
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  6.  11
    Moral Puzzles and Legal Perplexities: Essays on the Influence of Larry Alexander.Heidi M. Hurd (ed.) - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    Drawing inspiration from the profoundly influential work of legal theorist Larry Alexander, this volume tackles central questions in criminal law, constitutional law, jurisprudence, and moral philosophy. What are the legitimate conditions of blame and punishment? What values are at the heart of constitutional protections against discrimination or infringements of free speech? Must judges interpret statutes and constitutional provisions in ways that comport with the intentions of those who wrote them? Can the law obligate us to violate the demands of morality, (...)
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  7.  26
    Negligence in the Air.Michael S. Moore & Heidi M. Hurd - 2002 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 3 (2).
    The article examines what has come to be known as "the risk analysis" in Anglo-American tort law and contract law. The risk analysis essentially consists of: viewing negligence as a relational concept, so that a defendant is never simply negligent tout cour, but is negligent only with respect to certain persons and certain harms — other harms suffered by other persons are said not to be "within the risk" that makes the defendant negligent; and the supplanting of proximate cause doctrine (...)
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  8.  24
    Book Reviews Edlin, Douglas E. Judges and Unjust Laws: Common Law Constitutionalism and the Foundations of Judicial Review . Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2009. Pp. 321. $65.00 (cloth). [REVIEW]Heidi M. Hurd - 2009 - Ethics 120 (1):165-170.
  9. The Moral Magic of Consent: Heidi M. Hurd.Heidi Hurd - 1996 - Legal Theory 2 (2):121-146.
    We regularly wield powers that, upon close scrutiny, appear remarkably magical. By sheer exercise of will, we bring into existence things that have never existed before. With but a nod, we effect the disappearance of things that have long served as barriers to the actions of others. And, by mere resolve, we generate things that pose significant obstacles to others' exercise of liberty. What is the nature of these things that we create and destroy by our mere decision to do (...)
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  10.  9
    Climate Change, Natural Aesthetics, and the Danger of Adapted Preferences.Gillian K. J. Moore & Heidi M. Hurd - 2023 - In Pellegrino Gianfranco & Marcello Di Paola (eds.), Handbook of Philosophy of Climate Change. Springer Nature. pp. 415-430.
    This chapter explores reasons to doubt the defensibility of the “weak theory of sustainability” that informs and justifies the use of cost-benefit analysis by environmental regulators. As the argument reveals, inasmuch as the weak theory equates what is sustainable with what sustains the satisfaction of human preferences, it has the surprising philosophical wherewithal to make climate-changing activities sustainable, at least in principle. This would be so if human ingenuity made possible the replacement of ecosystem services with technological alternatives. And it (...)
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  11.  35
    Judaism and Enlightenment (review).Heidi M. Ravven - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (3):343-345.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Judaism and EnlightenmentHeidi Morrison RavvenAdam Sutcliffe. Judaism and Enlightenment. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. xv + 314. Cloth, $60.00.Adam Sutcliffe's detailed and wide-ranging historical study of the image of the Jews and of Judaism in the minds of Enlightenment thinkers very broadly conceived might better be [End Page 343] titled Enlightenment Myths of Jews and Judaism. Sutcliffe admirably captures the consistently mythic portrayal of Jews (...)
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  12.  22
    Mitochondria and the culture of the Borg.Emelie Braschi & Heidi M. McBride - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (11):958-966.
    As endosymbionts, the mitochondria are unique among organelles. This review provides insights into mitochondrial behavior and introduces the idea of a unified collective, an interconnected reticulum reminiscent of the Borg, a fictional humanoid species from the Star Trek television series whereby decisions are made within their network (or “hive”), linked to signaling cascades that coordinate the cross‐talk between mitochondrial and cellular processes (“subspace domain”). Similarly, mitochondrial dynamics are determined by two distinct processes, namely the local regulation of fission/fusion and the (...)
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  13.  48
    Free Will Skepticism: Current Arguments and Future Directions. [REVIEW]Heidi M. Ravven - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):383-386.
    Offered here is a review of Gregg D. Caruso’s edited volume, Exploring the Illusion of Free will and Moral Responsibility [1]. Assembled here are essays by nearly all the major contributors to the philosophical free will debate on the denial and skeptical side. The volume tells us where the field currently is and also gives us a sense of how the free will debate is actually advancing toward greater understanding. Perhaps we can even discern some glimmer of hope for a (...)
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  14.  32
    Heidi M. Hurd.Heidi M. Hurd - 2000 - Legal Theory 6 (4):423-455.
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  15.  48
    Serious Ethical Violations in Medicine: A Statistical and Ethical Analysis of 280 Cases in the United States From 2008–2016. [REVIEW]Heidi A. Walsh, Jessica Mozersky, John T. Chibnall, Emily E. Anderson & James M. DuBois - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (1):16-34.
    Serious ethical violations in medicine, such as sexual abuse, criminal prescribing of opioids, and unnecessary surgeries, directly harm patients and undermine trust in the profession of medicine. We review the literature on violations in medicine and present an analysis of 280 cases. Nearly all cases involved repeated instances of intentional wrongdoing, by males in nonacademic medical settings, with oversight problems and a selfish motive such as financial gain or sex. More than half of cases involved a wrongdoer with a suspected (...)
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  16.  37
    Why Liberals Should Hate "Hate Crime Legislation".Heidi M. Hurd - 2001 - Law and Philosophy 20 (2):215-232.
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  17. Moral Combat.Heidi M. Hurd - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):420-422.
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  18.  39
    Promises Schmomises.Heidi M. Hurd - 2017 - Law and Philosophy 36 (3):279-343.
    In this piece, I argue that promises need not be kept just because they were made. This is not to say, however, that unwise, unhappy, and unfortunate promises do not generate obligations. When broken promises will result either in wrongful gains to promisors or wrongful losses to promisees, obligations of corrective justice will demand that such promises be kept if their breach cannot be fully repaired. Thus, when a broken promise will constitute a deliberate loss transfer for personal gain, the (...)
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  19.  17
    Review: Carla Bagnoli, ed., Morality and the Emotions. [REVIEW]Review by: Heidi L. Maibom - 2014 - Ethics 124 (2):384-388,.
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  20. International Consensus Based Review and Recommendations for Minimum Reporting Standards in Research on Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation.Adam D. Farmer, Adam Strzelczyk, Alessandra Finisguerra, Alexander V. Gourine, Alireza Gharabaghi, Alkomiet Hasan, Andreas M. Burger, Andrés M. Jaramillo, Ann Mertens, Arshad Majid, Bart Verkuil, Bashar W. Badran, Carlos Ventura-Bort, Charly Gaul, Christian Beste, Christopher M. Warren, Daniel S. Quintana, Dorothea Hämmerer, Elena Freri, Eleni Frangos, Eleonora Tobaldini, Eugenijus Kaniusas, Felix Rosenow, Fioravante Capone, Fivos Panetsos, Gareth L. Ackland, Gaurav Kaithwas, Georgia H. O'Leary, Hannah Genheimer, Heidi I. L. Jacobs, Ilse Van Diest, Jean Schoenen, Jessica Redgrave, Jiliang Fang, Jim Deuchars, Jozsef C. Széles, Julian F. Thayer, Kaushik More, Kristl Vonck, Laura Steenbergen, Lauro C. Vianna, Lisa M. McTeague, Mareike Ludwig, Maria G. Veldhuizen, Marijke De Couck, Marina Casazza, Marius Keute, Marom Bikson, Marta Andreatta, Martina D'Agostini, Mathias Weymar, Matthew Betts, Matthias Prigge, Michael Kaess, Michael Roden, Michelle Thai, Nathaniel M. Schuster & Nico Montano - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
    Given its non-invasive nature, there is increasing interest in the use of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation across basic, translational and clinical research. Contemporaneously, tVNS can be achieved by stimulating either the auricular branch or the cervical bundle of the vagus nerve, referred to as transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation and transcutaneous cervical VNS, respectively. In order to advance the field in a systematic manner, studies using these technologies need to adequately report sufficient methodological detail to enable comparison of results between (...)
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  21.  60
    Liberty in Law.Heidi M. Hurd - 2002 - Law and Philosophy 21 (4-5):385-465.
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  22. Punishing the Awkward, the Stupid, the Weak, and the Selfish: The Culpability of Negligence.Michael S. Moore & Heidi M. Hurd - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):147-198.
    Negligence is a problematic basis for being morally blamed and punished for having caused some harm, because in such cases there is no choice to cause or allow—or risk causing or allowing—such harm to occur. The standard theories as to why inadvertent risk creation can be blameworthy despite the lack of culpable choice are that in such cases there is blame for: (1) an unexercised capacity to have adverted to the risk; (2) a defect in character explaining why one did (...)
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  23.  42
    Punishing the Awkward, the Stupid, the Weak, and the Selfish: The Culpability of Negligence.Michael S. Moore & Heidi M. Hurd - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):147-198.
    Negligence is a problematic basis for being morally blamed and punished for having caused some harm, because in such cases there is no choice to cause or allow—or risk causing or allowing—such harm to occur. The standard theories as to why inadvertent risk creation can be blameworthy despite the lack of culpable choice are that in such cases there is blame for: (1) an unexercised capacity to have adverted to the risk; (2) a defect in character explaining why one did (...)
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  24. Why liberals should hate ``hate crime legislation''.Heidi M. Hurd - 2001 - Law and Philosophy 20 (2):215 - 232.
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  25.  31
    International Consensus Based Review and Recommendations for Minimum Reporting Standards in Research on Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation.Adam D. Farmer, Adam Strzelczyk, Alessandra Finisguerra, Alexander V. Gourine, Alireza Gharabaghi, Alkomiet Hasan, Andreas M. Burger, Andrés M. Jaramillo, Ann Mertens, Arshad Majid, Bart Verkuil, Bashar W. Badran, Carlos Ventura-Bort, Charly Gaul, Christian Beste, Christopher M. Warren, Daniel S. Quintana, Dorothea Hämmerer, Elena Freri, Eleni Frangos, Eleonora Tobaldini, Eugenijus Kaniusas, Felix Rosenow, Fioravante Capone, Fivos Panetsos, Gareth L. Ackland, Gaurav Kaithwas, Georgia H. O'Leary, Hannah Genheimer, Heidi I. L. Jacobs, Ilse Van Diest, Jean Schoenen, Jessica Redgrave, Jiliang Fang, Jim Deuchars, Jozsef C. Széles, Julian F. Thayer, Kaushik More, Kristl Vonck, Laura Steenbergen, Lauro C. Vianna, Lisa M. McTeague, Mareike Ludwig, Maria G. Veldhuizen, Marijke De Couck, Marina Casazza, Marius Keute, Marom Bikson, Marta Andreatta, Martina D'Agostini, Mathias Weymar, Matthew Betts, Matthias Prigge, Michael Kaess, Michael Roden, Michelle Thai, Nathaniel M. Schuster & Nico Montano - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
    Given its non-invasive nature, there is increasing interest in the use of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation across basic, translational and clinical research. Contemporaneously, tVNS can be achieved by stimulating either the auricular branch or the cervical bundle of the vagus nerve, referred to as transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation and transcutaneous cervical VNS, respectively. In order to advance the field in a systematic manner, studies using these technologies need to adequately report sufficient methodological detail to enable comparison of results between (...)
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  26.  31
    Is it wrong to do right when others do wrong? A critique of american tort law.Heidi M. Hurd - 2001 - Legal Theory 7 (3):307-340.
  27.  26
    Moral Rights and Legal Rules: A Natural Law Theory,”.Heidi M. Hurd - 2000 - Legal Theory ( 6:2000.
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  28.  5
    4. Fouling Our Nest: Is Ethics Impotent against Economics?Heidi M. Hurd - 2015 - In Roger T. Ames Peter D. Hershock (ed.), Value and Values: Economics and Justice in an Age of Global Interdependence. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 82-108.
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  29.  50
    Introduction Symposium on Crime and Culpability.Heidi M. Hurd - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (4):371-372.
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  30.  27
    The Ethical Implications of Proportioning Punishment to Deontological Desert.Heidi M. Hurd & Michael S. Moore - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (3):495-514.
    This article details the degree to which the ideal of punishment proportional to desert forces changes in how we think of deontological morality. More specifically, the proportionality ideal forces us to abandon the simple, text-like view of deontological moral norms, and it forces us to acknowledge that those norms are not uniformly categorical in their force.
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  31.  14
    More than Just Music: Reconsidering the Educational Value of Music in School Rituals.Hanna M. Nikkanen & Heidi Westerlund - 2017 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 25 (2):112.
    Although rituals are considered central to human life, scholarship on rituals in music education is sparse. This may be due to a more general emphasis on the individual and private at the expense of the social and public aspects of music in education. This article highlights the educational value of school rituals in festivities and celebrations, arguing that there is a need to revisit the idea of musical performance as ritual from an educational perspective. By leaning on anthropological viewpoints, musical (...)
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  32.  61
    David S. Oderberg and Jacqueline A. Laing, human lives: Critical essays on consequentialist bioethics.Reviewed by David M. Adams - 2000 - Ethics 110 (2).
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  33.  17
    What Is a Public Education and Why We Need It: A Philosophical Inquiry into Self‐Development, Cultural Commitment, and Public Engagement.Reviewed by James M. Giarelli & Luke Greeley - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (6).
  34.  11
    Teaching Medical Students to Voice Their Values.Reviewed by Lisa M. Lee - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (9):1-2.
    Volume 19, Issue 9, September 2019, Page W1-W2.
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  35.  14
    Review: Gardner John, Law as a Leap of Faith. [REVIEW]Review by: Kenneth M. Ehrenberg - 2014 - Ethics 124 (4):899-905,.
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  36.  41
    Review: Paul M. Churchland: Plato's Camera: How the Physical Brain Captures a Landscape of Abstract Universals. [REVIEW]Review by: Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (1):161-165,.
  37.  20
    Review: Bruce Ackerman, We the People, vol. 3, The Civil Rights Revolution. [REVIEW]Review by: Courtney M. Cox - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):1178-1184,.
  38.  24
    Review: Carla Bagnoli, ed., Constructivism in Ethics. [REVIEW]Review by: Kathryn M. Lindeman - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):857-861,.
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  39.  14
    Review: Catriona Mackenzie, Wendy Rogers, and Susan Dodds, eds., Vulnerability: New Essays in Ethics and Feminist Philosophy. [REVIEW]Review by: Anita M. Superson - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):1210-1215,.
  40.  15
    Forbidding Intentional Mutilation: Some Unintended Consequences?Heidi M. Giebel - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):467-476.
    In a recent IPQ article, Christopher Kaczor gave a promising argument in which he strove to reconcile the common belief that obstetric craniotomy is immoral with his clear and intuitively attractive account of intention. One of Kaczor’s crucial assumptions is that intentional mutilation is morally impermissible. In this article I argue that Kaczor’s analysis has three potential problems: the mutilating features of craniotomy do not appear to meet Kaczor’s criteria for being intended, so his account doesn’t show craniotomy to be (...)
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  41. Maimonides Non-Kantian Moral Psychology: Maimonides and Kant on the Garden of Eden and the Genealogy of Morals.Heidi M. Ravven - 2012 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (2):199-216.
    Both Immanuel Kant and Moses Maimonides wrote lengthy treatments of the biblical garden of Eden. For both philosophers the biblical story served as an opportunity to address the genealogy of morals. I argue here that the two treatments offer deep insights into their respective philosophical anthropologies, that is to say, into their assessments of the human person and of moral psychology. Contrary to much that has been written about Maimonides as a proto-Kantian, I expose the profoundly different and even opposed (...)
     
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  42.  32
    Forbidding intentional mutilation: Some unintended consequences?Heidi M. Giebel - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):467-476.
    In a recent IPQ article, Christopher Kaczor gave a promising argument in which he strove to reconcile the common belief that obstetric craniotomy (the crushing of nearlyborn fetuses’ heads) is immoral with his clear and intuitively attractive account of intention. One of Kaczor’s crucial assumptions is that intentional mutilation is morally impermissible. In this article I argue that Kaczor’s analysis has three potential problems: (1) the mutilating features of craniotomy do not appear to meet Kaczor’s criteria for being intended, so (...)
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  43. Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned from Maimonides on the Prophetic Imagination: Part Two: Spinoza's Maimonideanism.Heidi M. Ravven - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):385-406.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 39.3 (2001) 385-406 [Access article in PDF] Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned from Maimonides on the Prophetic Imagination Part Two:Spinoza's Maimonideanism Heidi M. Ravven 1. Spinoza's Maimonideanism Now it is precisely with the belief that the prophets were philosophers and the Bible offers veiled insights into the central doctrines of philosophy, so powerfully argued and deeply held by Maimonides that he (...)
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  44. Introduction: the things that matter.Heidi M. Giebel - 2018 - In Heidi Marie Giebel (ed.), The things that matter: essays inspired by the later work of Jacques Maritain. Washington, D.C.: American Maritain Association.
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  45.  20
    Moral Puzzles and Legal Perplexities: Essays on the Influence of Larry Alexander, by Hurd Heidi, ed.Vincent Chiao - 2021 - Mind 131 (523):968-977.
    While many philosophers of law spend their careers exploring the warrens of a single neighbourhood within the sprawling cities of the philosophy of law, Larry Alexander has rambled widely, exploring obscure alleyways and dense downtowns, making significant and influential contributions along the way. The volume under review, a Festschrift in his honour, draws from a correspondingly wide range of areas of scholarship, from the philosophy of criminal law and punishment to constitutional law, from analytic jurisprudence to moral philosophy. Thus, given (...)
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  46. What's wrong with alienation?Heidi M. Silcox - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 131-144.
    Can art encourage social progress without invoking empathy? Bertolt Brecht thought so. He built convention violations into his plays in order to alienate audiences from their empathetic responses. He did this in order to encourage reasoned responses among his audience members. In so doing, Brecht ran the risk that spectators would imaginatively resist the play and focus exclusively on the convention violations. This kind of imaginative resistance does in fact undermine Brecht's purpose of achieving social progress. Contrary to Brecht's assessment, (...)
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  47.  32
    Letting Compassion Open the Door: Battered Women's Disclosure to Medical Providers.Heidi M. Bauer & Michael A. Rodriguez - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (4):459.
    Domestic violence is an important social problem that strongly impacts the healthcare system. It is estimated that two to four million women are physically abused each year by their husbands, ex-husbands, or boyfriends. Many of these abused women enter the medical system as patients with physical injuries, somatic symptoms, or psychiatric problems. These patients represent a large proportion of women patients in a variety of clinical settings: 22–35% of women presenting to emergency departments, up to 37% of obstetric patients, and (...)
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  48.  55
    A Response to James Pinkerton.Heidi M. Ravven - 1994 - The Owl of Minerva 26 (1):101-102.
    In his comments on the film version of Schindler’s List, James B. Pinkerton, writing in New York Newsday, blames Hegel - and Hegel above all others - for Nazism. He charges Hegel with undermining “the last bulwark of liberty and safety we have in a world populated by the imperfect: the rule of law.” Pinkerton further suggests, “One can perhaps build a respectable ideology out of a Hegelianism … but it’s much easier to just write ‘totalitarianism’ on such a political (...)
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  49.  9
    What Moral Exemplars Can Teach Us About Virtue, Psychology, and Ourselves.Heidi M. Giebel - 2022 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 96 (2):235-261.
    In this article, I discuss ethical lessons we can learn from the stories and beliefs of moral exemplars—and how these insights can complement and extend the knowledge we gain through theoretical study. First, exemplars teach us psychological lessons about the way in which virtue is developed and expressed: e.g., about role modeling and post-traumatic growth. Second, they teach us philosophical lessons about the nature of virtue itself and of particular ethical virtues: e.g., about how virtuous people deliberate and how they (...)
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  50.  61
    School Books - Alston Hurd Chase and Henry PhillipsJr.: A New Introduction to Greek. Pp. 128. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1946. Paper, 10 s_. - F. Kinchin Smith and T. W. Melluish: Teach Yourself Greek. Pp. 331. London: Hodder and Stoughton (for the English Universities Press), 1947. Cloth, 4 _s_. 6 _d_. - K. C. Masterman: A Latin Word-List. Pp. 3. Melbourne: Macmillan, 1945. Paper, 2 _s_. 6 _d_. - K. D. Robinson and R. L. Chambers: The Latin Way. Pp. xxviii+380 (many drawings by Hilary M. Crosse). London: Christophers, 1947. Cloth, 6 _s_. 6 _d_. - O. N. Jones: Faciliora Reddenda. Pp. 96. London and Glasgow: Blackie, 1947. Cloth, 2 _s_. - I. Williamson: The Friday Afternoon Latin Book. Pp. 79 (illustrated by drawings). London and Glasgow: Blackie, 1947. Cloth, 2 _s_. 3 _d[REVIEW]D. S. Colman - 1948 - The Classical Review 62 (3-4):158-159.
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