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  1.  93
    The Business of Ethics and Gender.A. Catherine McCabe, Rhea Ingram & Mary Conway Dato-on - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):101 - 116.
    Unethical decision-making behavior within organizations has received increasing attention over the past ten years. As a result, a plethora of studies have examined the relationship between gender and business ethics. However, these studies report conflicting results as to whether or not men and women differ with regards to business ethics. In this article, we propose that gender identity theory [Spence: 1993, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 64, 624–635], provides both the theory and empirical measures to explore the influence of (...)
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  2.  59
    Consumers' Evaluation of Unethical Marketing Behaviors: The Role of Customer Commitment. [REVIEW]Rhea Ingram, Steven J. Skinner & Valerie A. Taylor - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):237 - 252.
    While there is a significant amount of research investigating managerial ethical judgments, a limited amount examines consumer judgments of unethical corporate behavior and its impact on the marketplace. This study examines how consumers’ commitment to a company impacts not only their ethical judgment of corporate behavior but also the outcomes of that judgment. The authors test hypotheses with data from 334 consumers and find that consumers’ level of commitment attenuates the level of perceived fairness. More specifically, highly committed consumers may (...)
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  3.  14
    Consumers’ Evaluation of Unethical Marketing Behaviors: The Role of Customer Commitment.Rhea Ingram, Steven J. Skinner & Valerie A. Taylor - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):237-252.
    While there is a significant amount of research investigating managerial ethical judgments, a limited amount examines consumer judgments of unethical corporate behavior and its impact on the marketplace. This study examines how consumers' commitment to a company impacts not only their ethical judgment of corporate behavior but also the outcomes of that judgment. The authors test hypotheses with data from 334 consumers and find that consumers' level of commitment attenuates the level of perceived fairness. More specifically, highly committed consumers may (...)
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