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Richard P. Cooper [27]Richard Cooper [11]Richard S. Cooper [3]Richard M. Cooper [2]
Richard J. Cooper [1]
  1.  9
    Action Production and Event Perception as Routine Sequential Behaviors.Richard P. Cooper - 2021 - Wiley: Topics in Cognitive Science 13 (1):63-78.
    Topics in Cognitive Science, Volume 13, Issue 1, Page 63-78, January 2021.
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  2.  4
    Multidisciplinary Flux and Multiple Research Traditions Within Cognitive Science.Richard P. Cooper - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (4):869-879.
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  3. Cognitive Control: Componential or Emergent?Richard P. Cooper - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):598-613.
    The past 25 years have witnessed an increasing awareness of the importance of cognitive control in the regulation of complex behavior. It now sits alongside attention, memory, language, and thinking as a distinct domain within cognitive psychology. At the same time it permeates each of these sibling domains. This introduction reviews recent work on cognitive control in an attempt to provide a context for the fundamental question addressed within this topic: Is cognitive control to be understood as resulting from the (...)
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  4.  10
    Hierarchical Schemas and Goals in the Control of Sequential Behavior.Richard P. Cooper & Tim Shallice - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (4):887-916.
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  5. Analogy as Relational Priming: A Developmental and Computational Perspective on the Origins of a Complex Cognitive Skill.Robert Leech, Denis Mareschal & Richard P. Cooper - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):357-378.
    The development of analogical reasoning has traditionally been understood in terms of theories of adult competence. This approach emphasizes structured representations and structure mapping. In contrast, we argue that by taking a developmental perspective, analogical reasoning can be viewed as the product of a substantially different cognitive ability – relational priming. To illustrate this, we present a computational (here connectionist) account where analogy arises gradually as a by-product of pattern completion in a recurrent network. Initial exposure to a situation primes (...)
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  6.  72
    Beyond Single‐Level Accounts: The Role of Cognitive Architectures in Cognitive Scientific Explanation.Richard P. Cooper & David Peebles - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (2):243-258.
    We consider approaches to explanation within the cognitive sciences that begin with Marr's computational level or Marr's implementational level and argue that each is subject to fundamental limitations which impair their ability to provide adequate explanations of cognitive phenomena. For this reason, it is argued, explanation cannot proceed at either level without tight coupling to the algorithmic and representation level. Even at this level, however, we argue that additional constraints relating to the decomposition of the cognitive system into a set (...)
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  7.  57
    Thirty Years After Marr's Vision: Levels of Analysis in Cognitive Science.David Peebles & Richard P. Cooper - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (2):187-190.
    Thirty years after the publication of Marr's seminal book Vision the papers in this topic consider the contemporary status of his influential conception of three distinct levels of analysis for information-processing systems, and in particular the role of the algorithmic and representational level with its cognitive-level concepts. This level has been downplayed or eliminated both by reductionist neuroscience approaches from below that seek to account for behavior from the implementation level and by Bayesian approaches from above that seek to account (...)
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  8.  71
    The Goal Circuit Model: A Hierarchical Multi‐Route Model of the Acquisition and Control of Routine Sequential Action in Humans.Richard P. Cooper, Nicolas Ruh & Denis Mareschal - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (2):244-274.
    Human control of action in routine situations involves a flexible interplay between (a) task-dependent serial ordering constraints; (b) top-down, or intentional, control processes; and (c) bottom-up, or environmentally triggered, affordances. In addition, the interaction between these influences is modulated by learning mechanisms that, over time, appear to reduce the need for top-down control processes while still allowing those processes to intervene at any point if necessary or if desired. We present a model of the acquisition and control of goal-directed action (...)
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  9.  2
    Is There a Semantic System for Abstract Words?Tim Shallice & Richard P. Cooper - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  10.  22
    The Role of Falsification in the Development of Cognitive Architectures: Insights From a Lakatosian Analysis.Richard P. Cooper - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (3):509-533.
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  11.  43
    Are Automatic Imitation and Spatial Compatibility Mediated by Different Processes?Richard P. Cooper, Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (4):605-630.
    Automatic imitation or “imitative compatibility” is thought to be mediated by the mirror neuron system and to be a laboratory model of the motor mimicry that occurs spontaneously in naturalistic social interaction. Imitative compatibility and spatial compatibility effects are known to depend on different stimulus dimensions—body movement topography and relative spatial position. However, it is not yet clear whether these two types of stimulus–response compatibility effect are mediated by the same or different cognitive processes. We present an interactive activation model (...)
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  12.  21
    Soar and the Case for Unified Theories of Cognition.Richard Cooper & Tim Shallice - 1995 - Cognition 55 (2):115-149.
  13. Cognitive Neuroscience: The Troubled Marriage of Cognitive Science and Neuroscience.Richard P. Cooper & Tim Shallice - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):398-406.
    We discuss the development of cognitive neuroscience in terms of the tension between the greater sophistication in cognitive concepts and methods of the cognitive sciences and the increasing power of more standard biological approaches to understanding brain structure and function. There have been major technological developments in brain imaging and advances in simulation, but there have also been shifts in emphasis, with topics such as thinking, consciousness, and social cognition becoming fashionable within the brain sciences. The discipline has great promise (...)
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  14.  63
    Cognitive Architectures as Lakatosian Research Programs: Two Case Studies.Richard P. Cooper - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):199-220.
    Cognitive architectures - task-general theories of the structure and function of the complete cognitive system - are sometimes argued to be more akin to frameworks or belief systems than scientific theories. The argument stems from the apparent non-falsifiability of existing cognitive architectures. Newell was aware of this criticism and argued that architectures should be viewed not as theories subject to Popperian falsification, but rather as Lakatosian research programs based on cumulative growth. Newell's argument is undermined because he failed to demonstrate (...)
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  15.  20
    Deep-Learning Networks and the Functional Architecture of Executive Control.Richard P. Cooper - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  16.  3
    A Canonical Theory of Dynamic Decision-Making.John Fox, Richard P. Cooper & David W. Glasspool - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  17.  37
    Simple Heuristics Could Make Us Smart; but Which Heuristics Do We Apply When?Richard Cooper - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):746-746.
    Simple heuristics are clearly powerful tools for making near optimal decisions, but evidence for their use in specific situations is weak. Gigerenzer et al. (1999) suggest a range of heuristics, but fail to address the question of which environmental or task cues might prompt the use of any specific heuristic. This failure compromises the falsifiability of the fast and frugal approach.
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  18. Modelling the Correlation Between Two Putative Inhibition Tasks: An Analytic Approach.Eddy J. Davelaar & Richard P. Cooper - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
  19.  2
    An Architecturally Constrained Model of Random Number Generation and its Application to Modeling the Effect of Generation Rate.Nicholas J. Sexton & Richard P. Cooper - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  20.  5
    Structured Representations in the Control of Behavior Cannot Be so Easily Dismissed: A Reply to Botvinick and Plaut.Richard P. Cooper & Tim Shallice - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (4):929-931.
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  21.  28
    Mechanisms for the Generation and Regulation of Sequential Behaviour.Richard P. Cooper - 2003 - Philosophical Psychology 16 (3):389 – 416.
    A critical aspect of much human behaviour is the generation and regulation of sequential activities. Such behaviour is seen in both naturalistic settings such as routine action and language production and laboratory tasks such as serial recall and many reaction time experiments. There are a variety of computational mechanisms that may support the generation and regulation of sequential behaviours, ranging from those underlying Turing machines to those employed by recurrent connectionist networks. This paper surveys a range of such mechanisms, together (...)
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  22.  25
    Why the Dynamical Hypothesis Cannot Qualify as a Law of Qualitative Structure.Nick Braisby, Richard Cooper & Bradley Franks - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):630-631.
    Van Gelder presents the dynamical hypothesis as a novel law of qualitative structure to compete with Newell and Simon's (1976) physical symbol systems hypothesis. Unlike Newell and Simon's hypothesis, the dynamical hypothesis fails to provide necessary and sufficient conditions for cognition. Furthermore, imprecision in the statement of the dynamical hypothesis renders it unfalsifiable.
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  23.  7
    «Avec le temps»: Le voyage poétique en Italie de trois jeunes français, 1535.Richard Cooper - 2004 - Bibliothèque d'Humanisme Et Renaissance 66 (3):499-524.
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  24. Book Review. [REVIEW]Richard Cooper - 1978 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 98 (4):489-490.
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  25.  7
    Control of Cardiovascular Disease in the 20th Century: Meeting the Challenge of Chronic Degenerative Disease.Richard S. Cooper - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 61 (4):550-559.
    The scientific understanding of common chronic disease began in the mid-19th century, driven in large part by the development of the modern autopsy. For cardiovascular disease, the recognition that rigid plaques were obstructing muscular arteries, especially in the coronary arteries, provided a mechanism to explain what had been a mysterious "chest pain–sudden collapse" syndrome. The origin of these plaques was totally obscure, however, and they were given the descriptive name of "atherosclerosis," or "hardened porridge" in Greek. Not until 50 years (...)
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  26.  8
    Catalogue of the Arabic Manuscripts in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana.Richard S. Cooper, Oscar Löfgren, Renato Traini & Oscar Lofgren - 1978 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 98 (4):489.
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  27.  46
    Complementary Perspectives on Cognitive Control.Richard P. Cooper - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):208-211.
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  28.  10
    Ethical Issues in the Use of Electronic Health Records for Pharmacy Medicines Sales.Richard Cooper - 2007 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 5 (1):7-19.
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  29.  33
    Interruptibility as a Constraint on Hybrid Systems.Richard Cooper & Bradley Franks - 1993 - Minds and Machines 3 (1):73-96.
    It is widely mooted that a plausible computational cognitive model should involve both symbolic and connectionist components. However, sound principles for combining these components within a hybrid system are currently lacking; the design of such systems is oftenad hoc. In an attempt to ameliorate this we provide a framework of types of hybrid systems and constraints therein, within which to explore the issues. In particular, we suggest the use of system independent constraints, whose source lies in general considerations about cognitive (...)
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  30.  3
    Military Medical Research: 2. Proving the Safety and Effectiveness of a Nerve Gas Antidote--A Legal View.Richard M. Cooper - 1988 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 11 (4):7-9.
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  31.  17
    Neither Shaken nor Stirred: Reply to Bertenthal and Scheutz.Richard P. Cooper, Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (4):642-645.
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  32.  28
    On the Relation Between Marr's Levels: A Response to Blokpoel.Richard P. Cooper & David Peebles - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (2).
    Blokpoel reminds us of the importance of consistency of function across Marr's levels, but we argue that the approach to ensuring consistency that he advocates—a strict relation through exact implementation of the higher level function at the lower level—is unnecessarily restrictive. We show that it forces overcomplication of the computational level and results in the sacrifice of the distinct responsibilities associated with each level. We propose an alternative, no less rigorous, potential characterization of the relation between levels.
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  33.  10
    On the Relation Between Marr's Levels: A Response to Blokpoel.Richard P. Cooper & David Peebles - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (3):649-653.
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  34. Proving the Safety and Effectiveness of a Nerve Gas Antidote: A Legal View.Richard M. Cooper - 1989 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 11 (4):7.
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  35.  20
    The Assessment and Collection of Kharāj Tax in Medieval EgyptThe Assessment and Collection of Kharaj Tax in Medieval Egypt.Richard S. Cooper - 1976 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 96 (3):365.
  36.  33
    Two Closely Related Simulations Provide Weak Limits on Residual Normality.Richard P. Cooper - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):754-755.
    Thomas & Karmiloff- Smith correctly identify Residual Normality as a critical assumption of some theorising about mental structure within developmental psychology. However, their simulations provide only weak support for the conditions under which RN may occur because they explore closely related architectures that share a learning algorithm. It is suggested that more work is required to establish the limits of RN.
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  37. The French Dimension in Dante's Politics.Richard Cooper - 1997 - In John Woodhouse (ed.), Dante and Governance. Clarendon Press.
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  38.  53
    The Role of Object-Oriented Concepts in Cognitive Models.Richard Cooper - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (8):333.
  39.  4
    Visual Dominance and the Control of Action.Richard Cooper - 1998 - In M. A. Gernsbacher & S. J. Derry (eds.), Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawerence Erlbaum. pp. 250--255.
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  40.  9
    The Planning and Execution of Natural Sequential Actions in the Preschool Years.Livia Freier, Richard P. Cooper & Denis Mareschal - 2015 - Cognition 144:58-66.
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  41.  7
    Growing Cognition From Recycled Parts.Robert Leech, Denis Mareschal & Richard P. Cooper - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):401-414.
    In this response, we reiterate the importance of development (both ontogenetic and phylogenetic) in the understanding of a complex cognitive skill – analogical reasoning. Four key questions structure the response: Does relational priming exist, and is it sufficient for analogy? What do we mean by relations as transformations? Could all or any relations be represented as transformations? And what about the challenge of more complex analogies? In addressing these questions we bring together a number of supportive commentaries, strengthening our emergentist (...)
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  42. Proceedings of the Thirty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.Naomi Miyake, David Peebles & Richard Cooper (eds.) - 2012 - Cognitive Science Society.
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  43.  6
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Michelle Twomey, G. Curtiss Smitch, Michael A. Oliker, Roy Silver, Edward B. Goellner, Lopez Jr, Richard J. Cooper, N. Ray Hiner & Addie J. Butler - 1979 - Educational Studies 9 (4):442-463.
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  44.  15
    Relevance Theory, Pragmatic Inference and Cognitive Architecture.Wen Yuan, Francis Y. Lin & Richard P. Cooper - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):98-122.
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