152 found
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  1.  13
    Duns Scotus on Divine Immensity.Richard Cross - 2016 - Faith and Philosophy 33 (4):389-413.
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  2. Analytical Thomism: Traditions in Dialogue, Craig Paterson & Matthew Pugh Eds. (Review). [REVIEW]Richard Cross - 2007 - Ars Disputandi 7.
  3.  17
    Testimony, Error, and Reasonable Belief in Medieval Religious Epistemology.Richard Cross - 2018 - In Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne & Dani Rabinowitz (eds.), Knowledge, Belief, and God: New Insights in Religious Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  4.  45
    Duns Scotus.Richard Cross - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    The nature and content of the thought of Duns Scotus (c. 1266-1308) remains largely unknown except by the expert. This book provides an accessible account of Scotus' theology, focusing both on what is distinctive in his thought, and on issues where his insights might prove to be of perennial value.
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  5.  4
    Are Names Said of God and Creatures Univocally?Richard Cross - 2018 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 92 (2):313-320.
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  6.  14
    Moral Dilemmas in Medieval Thought From Gratian to Aquinas. By M.V. Dougherty.Richard Cross - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):404-405.
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  7.  21
    The Incarnation.Richard Cross - 2008 - In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    The Christian doctrine of the Incarnation maintains that the second person of the Trinity became a human being, retaining all attributes necessary for being divine and gaining all attributes necessary for being human. As usually understood, the doctrine involves the claim that the second person of the Trinity is the subject of the attributes of Jesus Christ, the first-century Jew whose deeds are reported in various ways in the New Testament. The fundamental philosophical problem specific to the doctrine is this: (...)
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  8.  23
    The Physics of Duns Scotus: The Scientific Context of a Theological Vision.Richard Cross - 1998 - Clarendon Press.
    Duns Scotus, along with Thomas Aquinas and William of Ockham, was one of the three most talented and influential of the medieval schoolmen, and a highly original thinker. This book examines the central concepts in his physics, including matter, space, time, and unity.
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  9.  27
    Idolatry and Religious Language.Richard Cross - 2008 - Faith and Philosophy 25 (2):190-196.
    Upholding a univocity theory of religious language does not entail idolatry, because nothing about univocity entails misidentifying God altogether—which is what idolatry amounts to. Upholders and opponents of univocity can agree on the object to which they are ascribing various attributes, even if they do not agree on the attributes themselves. Neither does the defender of univocity have to maintain that there is anything real really shared by God and creatures. Furthermore, even if much of language is analogous, syllogistic argument—and (...)
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  10.  2
    Richard Cross’s Response to Brian Davies.Richard Cross - 2018 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 92 (2):329-331.
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  11.  78
    What's Metaphysically Special About Supposits? Some Medieval Variations on Aristotelian Substance.Marilyn McCord Adams & Richard Cross - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):15–52.
  12. Some Varieties of Semantic Externalism in Duns Scotus's Cognitive Psychology.Richard Cross - 2008 - Vivarium 46 (3):275-301.
    According to Scotus, an intelligible species with universal content, inherent in the mind, is a partial cause of an occurrent cognition whose immediate object is the self-same species. I attempt to explain how Scotus defends the possibility of this causal activity. Scotus claims, generally, that forms are causes, and that inherence makes no difference to the capacity of a form to cause an effect. He illustrates this by examining a case in which an accident is an instrument of a substance (...)
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  13.  19
    Impairment, Normalcy, and a Social Theory of Disability.Richard Cross - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (4):693-714.
    I argue that, if it is thought desirable to avoid the collapse of disability into generic social disadvantage, it is necessary to draw a distinction between impairment and disability, as in social models of disability. I show how to draw such a distinction by utilizing a distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic properties. I argue further that, using this distinction, it is possible to define ‘impairment’ in ways that do not appeal to notions of the normal, and to define ‘disability’ in (...)
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  14.  80
    Anti-Pelagianism and the Resistibility of Grace.Richard Cross - 2005 - Faith and Philosophy 22 (2):199-210.
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  15. The Metaphysics of the Incarnation: Thomas Aquinas to Duns Scotus.Richard Cross - 2002 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The period from Thomas Aquinas to Duns Scotus is one of the richest in the history of Christian theology. The Metaphysics of the Incarnation provides a through examination of the doctrine in this era, making explicit its philosophical and theological foundations, and drawing conclusions for modern Christology.
     
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  16.  47
    Perichoresis, Deification, and Christological Predication in John of Damascus.Richard Cross - 2000 - Mediaeval Studies 62 (1):69-124.
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  17. Recent Work on the Philosophy of Duns Scotus.Richard Cross - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (8):667-675.
    This article highlights five areas of Scotus' philosophy that have recently been the subject of scholarly discussion. (1) Metaphysics : I outline the most current accounts of Scotus on individuation (thisness or haecceity) and the common nature. (2) Modal theory : I consider recent accounts both of Scotus' innovations in spelling out the notion of the logically (and broadly logically) possible, and of his account of the independence of modality. (3) Cognitive psychology : I examine recent views of Scotus' theory (...)
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  18.  72
    Duns Scotus on Eternity and Timelessness.Richard Cross - 1997 - Faith and Philosophy 14 (1):3-25.
    Scotus consistently holds that eternity is to be understood as timelessness. In his early Lectura, he criticizes Aquinas’ account of eternity on the grounds that (1) it entails collapsing past and future into the present, and (2) it entails a B-theory of time, according to which past, present and future are all ontologically on a par with each other. Scotus later comes to accept something like Aquinas’ account of God’s timelessness and the B-theory of time which it entails. Scotus also (...)
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  19.  79
    Duns Scotus and Analogy.Richard Cross - 2012 - Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):147-154.
    Duns Scotus defends the view that we can speak univocally of God and creatures. When we do so, we use words in the same sense in the two cases. Scotus maintains that the concepts that these univocal words signify are themselves univocal: the same concept in the two cases. In this paper, I consider a related question: does Duns Scotus have the notion of analogous concepts—concepts whose relation to each other lies somewhere between the univocal and the equivocal? Using some (...)
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  20.  84
    Two Models of the Trinity?Richard Cross - 2002 - Heythrop Journal 43 (3):275–294.
    Contrary to a common assumption, I argue that there is full agreement between East and West on the issue of the relation between the divine essence and the divine persons. I defend this claim by using the understanding of universals found in D. M. Armstrong to cast light on the theories. Taking Gregory of Nyssa and John of Damascus as representatives of the Eastern tradition, I show that this tradition sees the divine essence as a numerically singular object that is (...)
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  21.  61
    The Eternity of the World and the Distinction Between Creation and Conservation.Richard Cross - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (4):403-416.
    According to an important set of medieval arguments, it is impossible to make a distinction between creation and conservation on the assumption of a beginningless universe. The argument is that, on such an assumption, either God is never causally sufficient for the existence of the universe, or, if He is at one time causally sufficient for the existence of the universe, He is at all times causally sufficient for the universe, and occasionalism is true. I defend the claim that these (...)
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  22.  63
    Duns Scotus on Divine Substance and the Trinity.Richard Cross - 2003 - Medieval Philosophy and Theology 11 (2):181-201.
  23.  37
    Incarnation, Indwelling, and the Vision of God: Henry of Ghent and Some Franciscans.Richard Cross - 1999 - Franciscan Studies 57 (1):79 - 130.
    According to Henry of Ghent (d. 1293), it is impossible for the second person of the Trinity to assume into unity of person an irrational nature (e.g., a stone nature), or to assume a rational nature that does not enjoy the beatific vision. He argues that the assumption of a nature to a divine person entails both that the nature has the sort of powers that could exercise supernatural activities and that these powers are exercised. Henry’s Franciscan opponents argue against (...)
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  24.  85
    Four-Dimensionalism and Identity Across Time: Henry of Ghent Vs. Bonaventure.Richard Cross - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3):393-414.
  25.  48
    Aristotelian Substance and Supposits.Marilyn McCord Adams & Richard Cross - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79:15-72.
    [Marilyn McCord Adams] In this paper I begin with Aristotle's Categories and with his apparent forwarding of primary substances as metaphysically special because somehow fundamental. I then consider how medieval reflection on Aristotelian change led medieval Aristotelians to analyses of primary substances that called into question how and whether they are metaphysically special. Next, I turn to a parallel issue about supposits, which Boethius seems in effect to identify with primary substances, and how theological cases-the doctrines of the Trinity, the (...)
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  26.  19
    Divisibility, Communicability, and Predicability in Duns Scotus’s Theories of the Common Nature.Richard Cross - 2003 - Medieval Philosophy & Theology 11 (1):43-63.
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  27.  82
    Ockham on Part and Whole.Richard Cross - 1999 - Vivarium 37 (2):143-167.
  28.  27
    Marilyn McCord Adams.Marilyn McCord Adams & Richard Cross - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):15-52.
  29. Medieval Theories of Haecceity.Richard Cross - 2003 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  30.  12
    Edward Buckner and Jack Zupko, Duns Scotus on Time and Existence: The Questions on Aristotle’s “De Interpretatione.”. [REVIEW]Richard Cross - 2016 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (2):352-353.
  31. Atonement Without Satisfaction.Richard Cross - 2001 - Religious Studies 37 (4):397-416.
    According to Swinburne, one way of dealing with the guilt that attaches to a morally bad action is satisfaction, consisting of repentance, apology, reparation, and penance. Thus, Christ's life and death make atonement for human sin by providing a reparation which human beings would otherwise be unable to pay. I argue that the nature of God's creative activity entails that human beings can by themselves make reparation for their sins, merely by apology. So there is no need for additional reparation, (...)
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  32.  80
    Duns Scotus: Some Recent Research.Richard Cross - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):271-295.
    Duns Scotus (c. 1266-1308) has long ranked as one of the most challenging of philosophers. He was known from shortly after his death as doctor subtilis—the subtle doctor—and his obscure style and complex thought-processes make him a hard thinker to study. That said, he quickly established an almost cult following among his students, and his thought, for all its density, remained hugely popular throughout the Middle Ages and beyond. It is no exaggeration to claim that the last two decades have (...)
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  33. Relations, Universals, and the Abuse of Tropes.Richard Cross - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):53–72.
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  34.  30
    Divisibility, Communicability, and Predicability in Duns Scotus's Theories of the Common Nature.Richard Cross - 2003 - Medieval Philosophy and Theology 11 (1):43-63.
  35.  81
    Duns Scotus's Anti-Reductionistic Account of Material Substance.Richard Cross - 1995 - Vivarium 33 (2):137-170.
  36.  53
    Moral Dilemmas in Medieval Thought From Gratian to Aquinas. By M.V. Dougherty. (Cambridge UP, 2011. Pp. X + 226. Price £55.00, $90.00.). [REVIEW]Richard Cross - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):404-405.
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  37.  15
    II–Richard Cross: Relations, Universals, and The Abuse Of Tropes.Richard Cross - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):53-72.
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  38.  21
    Infinity, Continuity, and Composition: The Contribution of Gregory of Rimini.Richard Cross - 1998 - Medieval Philosophy and Theology 7 (1):89-110.
    Gregory of Rimini (1300s motivations for accepting this view, and indeed how precisely he understands it.
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  39.  58
    Henry of Ghent on the Reality of Non-Existing Possibles – Revisited.Richard Cross - 2010 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (2):115-132.
    According to a well-known interpretation, Henry of Ghent holds that possible but non-existent essences – items merely with what Henry labels ‘ esse essentiae ’ – have some reality external to the divine mind, but short of actual existence ( esse existentiae ). I argue that this reading of Henry is mistaken. Furthermore, Henry identifies any essence, considered independently of its existence as a universal concept or as instantiated in a particular as an item that has some kind of reality (...)
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  40.  23
    Duns Scotus on the Semantic Content of Cognitive Acts and Species.Richard Cross - 2010 - Quaestio 10 (1):135-154.
    Scotus holds that dispositional and occurrent cognitions are qualities that inhere in the soul. These qualities have semantic or conceptual content. I show that such content is nothing in any sense real, and that this content consists either in the relevant quality’s being measured by an extramental object, or in its being such that it would be measured by such an object in the case that there were such an object. The measurement relation, in the case of an intelligible species, (...)
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  41.  20
    Richard Cross.Marilyn McCord Adams & Richard Cross - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):53-72.
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  42.  58
    Incarnation, Omnipresence, and Action at a Distance.Richard Cross - 2003 - Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 45 (3):293-312.
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  43.  25
    Disability, Impairment, and Some Medieval Accounts of the Incarnation: Suggestions for a Theology of Personhood.Richard Cross - 2011 - Modern Theology 27 (4):639 - 658.
    Drawing on insights from the medieval theologians Duns Scotus and Hervaeus Natalis, I argue that medieval views of the Incarnation require that there is a sense in which the divine person depends on his human nature for his human personhood, and thus that the paradigmatic pattern of human personhood is in some way dependent existence. I relate this to a modern distinction between impairment and disability to show that impairment -- understood as dependence -- is normative for human personhood. I (...)
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  44. A Recent Contribution on the Distinction Between Monophysitism and Chalcedonianism.Richard Cross - 2001 - The Thomist 65 (3):361-383.
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  45. Aquinas on Nature, Hypostasis, and the Metaphysics of the Incarnation.Richard Cross - 1996 - The Thomist 60 (2):171 - 202.
    Aquinas distinguishes four types of part included in a hypostasis (’suppositum’): (1) kind-nature; (2) individuating feature(s); (3) accidents; (4) concrete parts. (1) - (3) in some sense contribute ’esse’ to the ’suppositum’. Usually Aquinas holds that Christ’s human nature does not contribute ’esse’ to its divine ’suppositum’, since it is analogous to a concrete part of its ’suppositum’. This effectively commits Aquinas to the Monophysite heresy. In ’De Unione’ Aquinas argues instead that Christ’s human nature contributes ’secondary ’esse‘ to its (...)
     
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  46.  46
    Is Aquinas's Proof for the Indestructibility of the Soul Successful?Richard Cross - 1997 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (1):1 – 20.
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  47.  37
    Antonie Vos, The Philosophy of John Duns Scotus, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006. Xii + 672pp, £170 Hb. ISBN 9780748624621. [REVIEW]Richard Cross - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (2):211-213.
  48.  26
    Form and Universal in Boethius.Richard Cross - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (3):439-458.
    Contrary to the claims of recent commentators, I argue that Boethius holds a modified version of the Ammonian three-fold universal (transcendent, immanent, and conceptual). He probably identifies transcendent universals as divine ideas, and accepts too forms immanent in corporeal particulars, most likely construing these along the Aphrodisian lines that he hints at in a well-known passage from his second commentary on Porphyry's Isagoge. Boethius never states the theory of the three-fold form outright, but I attempt to show that this theory (...)
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  49.  24
    Identity, Origin, and Persistence in Duns Scotus's Physics.Richard Cross - 1999 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (1):1 - 18.
  50.  25
    Review of Russell L. Friedman, Medieval Trinitarian Thought From Aquinas to Ockham[REVIEW]Richard Cross - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (11).
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