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Richard Gotshalk [10]Richard Allan Gotshalk [1]
  1. The Temporality of Human Excellence: A Reading of Five Dialogues of Plato.Richard Gotshalk - 2001 - University Press of America.
    Why does Plato write dialogues? Why more than one? The Temporality of Human Excellence begins with a brief introductory consideration of these questions, and concludes with a suggestion about two things: the intent of his use of this form, and the manner of its concrete realization in a set of two dozen or so dialogues. Taking up each dialogue as a separate drama, the reading seeks to focus attention on how each, by its characters, their interplay and conversation, and the (...)
     
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    Dewey's Conception of Being and Philosophical Reflection.Richard Gotshalk - 1964 - Dialogue 3 (2):142-152.
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    Bhagavad GītāBhagavad Gita.Richard Salomon & Richard Gotshalk - 1989 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 109 (1):144.
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  4. Loving and Dying: A Reading of Plato's Phaedo, Symposium, and Phaedrus.Richard Gotshalk - 2001 - University Press of America.
    Loving and Dying is a reading of three dialogues which, using the figure of Socrates conversing in three different concrete situations, in complementary fashion address death, love, and reflection, as matters central to finding and understanding life's meaning and to sharing in the kind of immortality that is open to a human being. The intent of the work is simply to bring to attention how the dialogues register as drama and how they achieve this provocation of the reader to reflection (...)
     
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  5. The Beginnings of Philosophy in China.Richard Gotshalk - 1999 - University Press of America.
  6. The Beginnings of Philosophy in India.Richard Gotshalk - 1998 - Upa.
    Philosophy was born in India in the late 8th century, at a crucial but troubled time in the emergence of a civilization which integrated peoples of northern India with contrasting Aryan and Indus Valley heritages. This book begins with a recalling of the extended historical dynamic that culminated in that time. Given the sketch of the historical background and matrix, the book then attempts an exposition of a number of the important Upanisads . Richard Gotshalk provides fresh interpretations and translations (...)
     
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  7. The Beginnings of Philosophy in Greece.Richard Gotshalk - 2000 - Upa.
    Philosophy arose in Greece in a three-fold birth, first in 6th century Ionia, then in 6th century south Italy, and finally in 5th century Athens. This triple-birth, together with the character and differences of these three beginnings, becomes intelligible when the historical background and matrix involved are recalled. Richard Gotshalk begins this work with an extended sketch of that background, emphasizing the emergence of poetry as a truth-revealer beyond myth and the role of Homer and Hesiod in shaping by their (...)
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  8. The Classic of Way and Her Power: A Miscellany?Richard Gotshalk - 2007 - Upa.
    The Classic of Way and her power: a Miscellany? is a study of the profound and influential philosophical writing from early China, traditionally attributed to Lao-zi, the first Daoist thinker. This study provides a translation of the work, but concentrates on analysis. It offers an interpretation of why the traditional work appears to lack order, suggesting that it began as a set of twenty-five philosophical poems by Lao-zi, tightly arranged according to an unusual and unmarked principle of order, and then (...)
     
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  9. The Well of Eternity.Richard Gotshalk - 2006 - Upa.
    In an effort to clear up misunderstanding of his previous writings and avoid future misinterpretations, Nietzsche assessed his own work in the autobiographical Ecce Homo and offered readers pointers for properly reading and understanding his writings. The Well of Eternity addresses Nietzsche's thinking on time and temporality in eight of his works, beginning with The Birth of Tragedy and culminating in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, using the pointers described in Ecce Homo. Its detailed exploration highlights three points: how central the matter (...)
     
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