7 found
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  1.  44
    Ethics in a World of Difference.Richard Hugman - 2008 - Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (2):118-132.
    International statements about social work ethics have been criticized as imposing Western values in non-Western contexts. Two forms of this criticism can be identified in recent literature, one ?strong? in that it calls for each cultural context to generate its own relevant values, the other ?qualified? in that while it seeks basic common values it calls for these to be interpreted with cultural sensitivity. Such arguments raise a particular problem with the notion of human rights as a foundation for social (...)
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  2.  16
    Ethical Issues in Social Work.Richard Hugman & David Smith (eds.) - 1995 - Routledge.
    It has always been recognised that the practice of social work raises ethical questions and dilemmas. Recently, however, traditional ways of addressing ethical issues in social work have come to seem inadequate, as a result of developments both in philosophy and in social work theory and practice. This collection of thought-provoking essays explores the ethics of social work practice on the light of these changes. Ethical Issues in Social Work provides up to date critical analyses of the ethical implications of (...)
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  3.  10
    Collective Choice and Social Welfare: Considerations for Indigenous Australians.Susan Green & Richard Hugman - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (4):400-406.
  4.  36
    Global Ethics for Social Work: Problems and Possibilities—Papers From the Ethics & Social Welfare Symposium, Durban, July 2008.Sarah Banks, Richard Hugman, Lynne Healy, Vivienne Bozalek & Joan Orme - 2008 - Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (3):276-290.
    This piece comprises short presentations given by contributors to a symposium organized by the journal Ethics & Social Welfare on the theme of global ethics for social work. The contributors offer their reflections on the extent to which universally accepted international statements of ethical principles in social work are possible or useful, engaging with debates about cultural diversity, relativism and the relevance of human rights in non-Western countries.
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  5.  22
    Social Work and the Ethics of Involuntary Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa: A Postmodern Approach.Sacha Kendall & Richard Hugman - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (4):1-16.
  6.  27
    Religious Dimensions of the Origins of Professional Social Work and the Possibility of an International Code of Ethics.Richard Hugman - 2003 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 11 (1):37-54.
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  7.  3
    Ethical Challenges and Human Rights in Africa.Dorothee Hölscher, Rodreck Mupedziswa & Richard Hugman - 2014 - Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (2):99-100.
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