Results for 'Richard J. Riding'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  12
    Cognitive Style and Motor Skill and Sports Performance.Richard J. Riding & Nizar Al-Salih - 2000 - Educational Studies 26 (1):19-32.
    A pool of 116 14-18-year-old secondary school pupils who had been given the computer-presented Cognitive Styles Analysis was used to provide two sub-samples to explore the relationship between style and motor skills and sports performance. The Motor Skills sub-sample of 69 did a battery of motor skills tests. A factor analysis suggested four skills factors - bodily movement, interactive skills, mechanical skills and aiming. All of these except the mechanical skills showed a significant relationship to style. The Sports Performance sub-sample (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  29
    The Priority of the Right Over the Good Rides Again:A Treatise on Social Justice, Vol. 2, Justice as Impartiality. Brian Barry.Richard J. Arneson - 1997 - Ethics 108 (1):169-.
  3.  10
    Review: The Priority of the Right Over the Good Rides Again. [REVIEW]Richard J. Arneson - 1997 - Ethics 108 (1):169 - 196.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  31
    The Relationship Between Anxiety‐Stability, Working Memory and Cognitive Style.Michael Grimley, Hassan Dahraei & Richard J. Riding - 2008 - Educational Studies 34 (3):213-223.
    While prior research indicates that relationships exist between anxiety‐stability and working memory, and cognitive style and anxiety‐stability, they have not been considered together. The aim of this study was to consider how anxiety‐stability is related to working memory, gender and style in interaction. The sample consisted of 179 12–13‐year‐old Year 8 secondary comprehensive school pupils in the UK. Teachers rated the level of anxiety‐stability of pupils. Pupils completed an assessment of working memory efficiency, the information processing index . They also (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Human Flourishing Versus Desire Satisfaction: RICHARD J. ARNESON.Richard J. Arneson - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (1):113-142.
    What is the good for human persons? If I am trying to lead the best possible life I could lead, not the morally best life, but the life that is best for me, what exactly am I seeking? This phrasing of the question I will be pursuing may sound tendentious, so some explanation is needed. What is good for one person, we ordinarily suppose, can conflict with what is good for other persons and with what is required by morality. A (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  6.  17
    II—Richard J. Arneson.Richard J. Arneson - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):73-90.
  7.  56
    Property Rights in Persons: RICHARD J. ARNESON.Richard J. Arneson - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (1):201-230.
    In contemporary market societies, the laws do not place individuals under enforceable obligations to aid others. Perhaps the most striking exception to this broad generalization is the practice of conscription of able-bodied males into military service, particularly in time of war. Another notable exception is the legal enforcement in some contemporary societies of “Good Samaritan” obligations — obligations to provide temporary aid to victims of emergencies, such as car accident victims. The obligation applies to those who are in the immediate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  8. Self-Ownership and World Ownership: Against Left-Libertarianism: Richard J. Arneson.Richard J. Arneson - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):168-194.
    Left-libertarianism is a version of Lockean libertarianism that combines the idea that each person is the full rightful owner of herself and the idea that each person should have the right to own a roughly equal amount of the world's resources. This essay argues against left-libertarianism. The specific target is an interesting form of left-libertarianism proposed by Michael Otsuka that is especially stringent in its equal world ownership claim. One criticism advanced is that there is more tension than Otsuka acknowledges (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  9.  84
    Luck and Equality: Richard J. Arneson.Richard J. Arneson - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):73–90.
  10. Egalitarian Justice Versus the Right to Privacy?: RICHARD J. ARNESON.Richard J. Arneson - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):91-119.
    In their celebrated essay “The Right to Privacy,” legal scholars Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis identified as the generic privacy value “the right to be let alone.” This same phrase occurs in Justice Brandeis's dissent in Olmstead v. U.S.. This characterization of privacy has been found objectionable by philosophers acting as conceptual police. For example, moral philosopher William Parent asserts that one can wrongfully fail to let another person alone in all sorts of ways—such as assault—that intuitively do not qualify (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  11. Liberalism, Capitalism, and “Socialist” Principles: Richard J. Arneson.Richard J. Arneson - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (2):232-261.
    One way to think about capitalism-versus-socialism is to examine the extent to which capitalist economic institutions are compatible with the fulfillment of socialist ideals. The late G. A. Cohen has urged that the two are strongly incompatible. He imagines how it would make sense for friends to organize a camping trip, distills the socialist moral principles that he sees fulfilled in the camping trip model, and observes that these principles conflict with a capitalist organization of the economy. He adds that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12. Equality and Equal Opportunity for Welfare.Richard J. Arneson - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 56 (1):77 - 93.
  13.  78
    The New Constellation: The Ethical-Political Horizons of Modernity / Postmodernity.Richard J. BERNSTEIN - 1992 - MIT Press.
  14. Beyond Objectivism and Relativism: Science, Hermeneutics, and Praxis.Richard J. Bernstein - 1983 - University of Pennsylvania Press.
    "A fascinating and timely treatment of the objectivism versus relativism debates occurring in philosophy of science, literary theory, the social sciences, ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   194 citations  
  15. RICHARD J. BERNSTEIN'Anti-Foundationalism'*(1991).From Richard J. Bernstein - 2003 - In Gerard Delanty & Piet Strydom (eds.), Philosophies of Social Science: The Classic and Contemporary Readings. Open University.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Luck Egalitarianism and Prioritarianism.Richard J. Arneson - 2000 - Ethics 110 (2):339-349.
    In her recent, provocative essay “What Is the Point of Equality?”, Elizabeth Anderson argues against a common ideal of egalitarian justice that she calls “ luck egalitarianism” and in favor of an approach she calls “democratic equality.”1 According to the luck egalitarian, the aim of justice as equality is to eliminate so far as is possible the impact on people’s lives of bad luck that falls on them through no fault or choice of their own. In the ideal luck egalitarian (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   131 citations  
  17.  68
    One Step Forward, Two Steps Backward: Richard Rorty on Liberal Democracy and Philosophy.Richard J. Bernstein - 1987 - Political Theory 15 (4):538-563.
  18.  41
    Socialism as the Extension of Democracy: RICHARD J. ARNESON.Richard J. Arneson - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (2):145-171.
    Are socialists best regarded as those who are most truly and consistently committed to democracy, under modern industrial conditions? Is the underlying issue that divides liberals from socialists the degree of their wholeheartedness in affirming the ideal of a democratic society? On the liberal side, Friedrich Hayek has remarked: “It is possible for a dictator to govern in a liberal way. And it is also possible that a democracy governs with a total lack of liberalism. My personal preference is for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Physicalism, Emergence and Downward Causation.Richard J. Campbell & Mark H. Bickhard - 2011 - Axiomathes 21 (1):33-56.
    The development of a defensible and fecund notion of emergence has been dogged by a number of threshold issues neatly highlighted in a recent paper by Jaegwon Kim. We argue that physicalist assumptions confuse and vitiate the whole project. In particular, his contention that emergence entails supervenience is contradicted by his own argument that the ‘microstructure’ of an object belongs to the whole object, not to its constituents. And his argument against the possibility of downward causation is question-begging and makes (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  20.  56
    Richard J. Lazarus: The Making of Environmental Law. [REVIEW]Richard P. Haynes - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):613-616.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. The Principle of Fairness and Free-Rider Problems.Richard J. Arneson - 1982 - Ethics 92 (4):616-633.
    This article references the following linked citations. If you are trying to access articles from an off-campus location, you may be required to first logon via your library web site to access JSTOR. Please visit your library's website or contact a librarian to learn about options for remote access to JSTOR.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  22. Luck Egalitarianism Interpretated and Defended.Richard J. Arneson - 2004 - Philosophical Topics 32 (1/2):1-20.
    In recent years some moral philosophers and political theorists, who have come to be called “luck egalitarians,” have urged that the essence of social justice is the moral imperative to improve the condition of people who suffer from simple bad luck. Prominent theorists who have attracted the luck egalitarian label include Ronald Dworkin, G. A. Cohen, and John Roemer.1 Larry Temkin should also be included in this group, as should Thomas Nagel at the time that he wrote Equality and Partiality.2 (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  23. Joel Feinberg and the Justification of Hard Paternalism.Richard J. Arneson - 2005 - Legal Theory 11 (3):259-284.
    Joel Feinberg was a brilliant philosopher whose work in social and moral philosophy is a legacy of excellent, even stunning achievement. Perhaps his most memorable achievement is his four-volume treatise on The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, and perhaps the most striking jewel in this crowning achievement is his passionate and deeply insightful treatment of paternalism.1 Feinberg opposes Legal Paternalism, the doctrine that “it is always a good reason in support of a [criminal law] prohibition that it is necessary (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  24. Pragmatism, Critique, Judgment: Essays for Richard J.Richard J. Bernstein, Seyla Benhabib & Nancy Fraser (eds.) - 2004 - MIT Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Mill Versus Paternalism.Richard J. Arneson - 1980 - Ethics 90 (4):470-489.
  26. Against Rawlsian Equality of Opportunity.Richard J. Arneson - 1999 - Philosophical Studies 93 (1):77-112.
  27. Liberalism, Distributive Subjectivism, and Equal Opportunity for Welfare.Richard J. Arneson - 1990 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (2):158-194.
  28. If It Itches, Scratch!Richard J. Hall - 2008 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):525 – 535.
    Many bodily sensations are connected quite closely with specific actions: itches with scratching, for example, and hunger with eating. Indeed, these connections have the feel of conceptual connections. With the exception of D. M. Armstrong, philosophers have largely neglected this aspect of bodily sensations. In this paper, I propose a theory of bodily sensations that explains these connections. The theory ascribes intentional content to bodily sensations but not, strictly speaking, representational content. Rather, the content of these sensations is an imperative: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  29. Perfectionism and Politics.Richard J. Arneson - 2000 - Ethics 111 (1):37-63.
    Philosophers perennially debate the nature of the good for humans. Is it subjective or objective? That is to say, do the things that are intrinsically good for an agent, good for their own sakes and apart from further consequences, acquire this status only in virtue of how she happens to regard them? Or are there things that are good in themselves for an individual independently of her desires and attitudes toward them? The issue sounds recondite, but has been thought to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  30. Luck Egalitarianism–A Primer.Richard J. Arneson - 2011 - In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.), Responsibility and Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press. pp. 24--50.
    This essay surveys varieties of the luck egalitarian project in an exploratory spirit, seeking to identify lines of thought that are worth developing further and that might ultimately prove morally acceptable. I do not attend directly to the critics and assess their concerns; I have done that in other essays. 7 I do seek to identify some large fault lines, divisions in ways of approaching the task of constructing a theory of justice or of conceiving its substance. These are controversial (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  31.  18
    Animal Rights and Human Morality.Richard J. Hall - 1983 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (1):135.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  32.  31
    Richard Rorty’s Deep Humanism.Richard J. Bernstein - 2008 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 29 (2):53-69.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  3
    Equality of Opportunity for Welfare Defended and Recanted.Richard J. Arneson - 1999 - Journal of Political Philosophy 7 (4):488-497.
    Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen’s interesting criticisms of the ideal of equality of opportunity for welfare provide a welcome occasion for rethinking the requirements of egalitarian distributive justice.1 In the essay he criticizes I had proposed that insofar as we think distributive justice requires equality of any sort, we should conceive of distributive equality as equal opportunity provision. Roughly put, my suggestion was that equality of opportunity for welfare obtains among a group of people when all would have the same expected welfare over (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  34.  31
    Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Introduction.Richard J. Arneson - 1994 - Ethics 104 (2):388-392.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  35.  77
    The Functional Neuroanatomy of Emotion and Affective Style.Richard J. Davidson & William Irwin - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):11-21.
  36.  81
    Meaningful Work and Market Socialism.Richard J. Arneson - 1987 - Ethics 97 (3):517-545.
  37. What, If Anything, Renders All Humans Morally Equal?Richard J. Arneson - 1999 - In . Blackwell. pp. 103-128.
    All humans have an equal basic moral status. They possess the same fundamental rights, and the comparable interests of each person should count the same in calculations that determine social policy. Neither supposed racial differences, nor skin color, sex, sexual orientation, ethnicity, intelligence, nor any other differences among humans negate their fundamental equal worth and dignity. These platitudes are virtually universally affirmed. A white supremacist racist or an admirer of Adolf Hitler who denies them is rightly regarded as beyond the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  38.  60
    Extreme Cosmopolitanisms Defended.Richard J. Arneson - 2016 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 19 (5):555-573.
  39. Radical Evil: A Philosophical Interrogation.Richard J. Bernstein - 2002 - Polity.
    At present, there is an enormous gulf between the visibility of evil and the paucity of our intellectual resources for coming to grips with it. We have been flooded with images of death camps, terrorist attacks and horrendous human suffering. Yet when we ask what we mean by radical evil and how we are to account for it, we seem to be at a loss for proper responses. Bernstein seeks to discover what we can learn about the meaning of evil (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  40.  33
    Affective Style and Affective Disorders: Perspectives From Affective Neuroscience.Richard J. Davidson - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (3):307-330.
  41.  6
    Habermas and Modernity.Richard J. Bernstein (ed.) - 1985 - MIT Press.
    All of these essays focus on the concept of modernity in the philosophical work of Jurgen Habermas - an ambitious and carefully argued intellectual project that invites, indeed demands, rigorous scrutiny. Following an introductory overview of Habermas's work by Richard Bernstein, Albrecht Wellmer's essay places the philosopher within the tradition of Hegel, Marx, Weber, and Critical Theory. Martin Jay discusses Habermas's views on art and aesthetics, and Joel Whitebook examines his interpretations of Freud and psychoanalysis, Anthony Giddens offers a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  42.  26
    Praxis and Action: Contemporary Philosophies of Human Activity.Richard J. Bernstein - 1971 - Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
    "The ancient and modern question of what is the nature of man and his activity and what ought to be the directions pursued in this activity is once again being ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  43. Egalitarianism and Responsibility.Richard J. Arneson - 1999 - The Journal of Ethics 3 (3):225-247.
    This essay examines several possible rationales for the egalitarian judgment that justice requires better-off individuals to help those who are worse off even in the absence of social interaction. These rationales include equality (everyone should enjoy the same level of benefits), moral meritocracy (each should get benefits according to her responsibility or deservingness), the threshold of sufficiency (each should be assured a minimally decent quality of life), prioritarianism (a function of benefits to individuals should be maximized that gives priority to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  44. Defending the Purely Instrumental Account of Democratic Legitimacy.Richard J. Arneson - 2003 - Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (1):122–132.
  45. Consequentialism Vs. Special-Ties Partiality.Richard J. Arneson - 2003 - The Monist 86 (3):382-401.
    Richard J. Arneson Word count 6932 Most people believe that partiality toward those near and dear to us is morally required. Parents ought to favor their own children over other people’s children, and friends ought to favor each other over strangers. Partiality toward extended kin, fellow clan members, co-nationals, neighbors, members of one’s own community, and other affiliates is often affirmed, though it is controversial or at least unclear just what sorts of social relationship generate obligations of partiality.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46. Good, Period.Richard J. Arneson - 2010 - Analysis 70 (4):731-744.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  47. Desert and Equality.Richard J. Arneson - 2006 - In Nils Holtug & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (eds.), Egalitarianism: New Essays on the Nature and Value of Equality. Clarendon Press. pp. 262--293.
  48. Dysfunction in the Neural Circuitry of Emotion Regulation—A Possible Prelude to Violence.Richard J. Davidson - unknown
    Emotion is normally regulated in the human brain by a complex circuit consisting of the orbital frontal cortex, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, and several other interconnected regions. There are both genetic and environmental contributions to the structure and function of this circuitry. We posit that impulsive aggression and violence arise as a consequence of faulty emotion regulation. Indeed, the prefrontal cortex receives a major serotonergic projection, which is dysfunctional in individuals who show impulsive violence. Individuals vulnerable to faulty regulation of (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  49.  3
    Ironic Life.Richard J. Bernstein - 2016 - Polity.
    "Just as philosophy begins with doubt, so also a life that may be called human begins with irony" so wrote Kierkegaard. While we commonly think of irony as a figure of speech where someone says one thing and means the opposite, the concept of irony has long played a more fundamental role in the tradition of philosophy, a role that goes back to Socrates Ð the originator and exemplar of the urbane ironic life. But what precisely is Socratic irony and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  50.  2
    The New Constellation: The Ethical-Political Horizons of Modernity / Postmodernity.Richard J. Bernstein - 1992 - Polity.
    In this major new work, Bernstein explores the ethical and political dimensions of the modernity/post-modernity debate. Bernstein argues that modernity / post-modernity should be understood as a kind of mood - one which is amorphous, shifting and protean but which exerts a powerful influence on our current thinking. Focusing on thinkers such as Heidegger, Derrida, Foucault, Habermas and Rorty, Bernstein probes the strengths and weaknesses of their work, and shows how they have contributed to the formation of a new mood, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000