16 found
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  1.  22
    Measurement of Sensory Intensity.Richard M. Warren - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):175-189.
  2.  7
    Visual Intensity Judgments: An Empirical Rule and a Theory.Richard M. Warren - 1969 - Psychological Review 76 (1):16-30.
  3.  16
    Prior Context and Fractional Versus Multiple Estimates of the Reflectance of Grays Against a Fixed Standard.E. C. Poulton, D. C. V. Simmonds, Richard M. Warren & John C. Webster - 1965 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (5):496.
  4.  12
    From Neurophysiology to Perception.Richard M. Warren - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):288-288.
  5.  4
    Criterion Shift Rule and Perceptual Homeostasis.Richard M. Warren - 1985 - Psychological Review 92 (4):574-584.
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  6.  34
    Relation of Sensory Scales to Physical Scales.Richard M. Warren - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (3):586-587.
  7.  27
    Global Pattern Perception and Temporal Order Judgments.Richard M. Warren - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):230-231.
  8.  22
    Should We Continue to Study Consciousness?Richard M. Warren - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):270-271.
    Block has attempted to reduce the confusion and controversy concerning the term “consciousness” by suggesting that there are two forms or types of consciousness, each of which has several characteristics or properties. This suggestion appears to further becloud the topic, however. Perhaps consciousness cannot be defined adequately and should not be considered as a topic that can be studied scientifically.
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  9.  34
    Synthesizing Complex Sensations From Simple Components.Richard M. Warren - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):90-91.
    The target article suggests that taste is not based on the traditional four basic tastes, but rather is a continuum subserved by cross-fiber integration. This commentary describes evidence indicating that the traditional concept is valid, and that with suitable precautions, it is possible to match natural substances using mixtures representing fundamental tastes.
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  10.  17
    Production of White Tone From White Noise and Voiced Speech From Whisper.Richard M. Warren & James A. Bashford - 1978 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (5):327-329.
  11.  13
    Sensation Magnitude Judgments Are Based Upon Estimates of Physical Magnitudes.Richard M. Warren - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):213-223.
  12.  11
    The Calibration of Sensory Scales.Richard M. Warren - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):319-320.
  13.  10
    The Use of Mathematical Models in Perceptual Theory.Richard M. Warren - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):776-776.
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  14.  13
    Confusion of Sensations and Their Physical Correlates.Richard M. Warren - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):51-51.
    The authors favor a “color realism” theory that considers colors to be physical properties residing in objects that reflect, emit, or transmit light. It is opposed to the theory that colors are sensations or visual experiences. This commentary suggests that both theories are correct, and that context usually indicates which of these dual aspects is being considered.
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  15.  8
    Sensory Magnitudes and Their Physical Correlates.Richard M. Warren - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):296-297.
  16.  16
    Phonemic Organization Does Not Occur: Hence No Feedback.Richard M. Warren - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):350-351.
    I agree with Norris et al. that feedback to a phonemic level is never necessary, but disagree strongly with their reason why this is true. I believe the available evidence indicates that there is no feedback because there is no phonemic level employed in the perceptual processing of speech.
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