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Richard Moore
Humboldt-Universität Zu Berlin
  1.  74
    Imitation and Conventional Communication.Richard Moore - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):481-500.
    To the extent that language is conventional, non-verbal individuals, including human infants, must participate in conventions in order to learn to use even simple utterances of words. This raises the question of which varieties of learning could make this possible. In this paper I defend Tomasello’s (The cultural origins of human cognition. Harvard UP, Cambridge, 1999, Origins of human communication. MIT, Cambridge, 2008) claim that knowledge of linguistic conventions could be learned through imitation. This is possible because Lewisian accounts of (...)
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  2. Gricean Communication, Joint Action, and the Evolution of Cooperation.Richard Moore - 2018 - Topoi 37 (2):329-341.
    It is sometimes claimed that Gricean communication is necessarily a form of cooperative or ‘joint’ action. A consequence of this Cooperative Communication View is that Gricean communication could not itself contribute to an explanation of the possibility of joint action. I argue that even though Gricean communication is often a form of joint action, it is not necessarily so—since it does not always require intentional action on the part of a hearer. Rejecting the Cooperative Communication View has attractive consequences for (...)
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  3.  44
    Social Cognition, Stag Hunts, and the Evolution of Language.Richard Moore - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):797-818.
    According to the socio-cognitive revolution hypothesis, humans but not other great apes acquire language because only we possess the socio-cognitive abilities required for Gricean communication, which is a pre-requisite of language development. On this view, language emerged only following a socio-cognitive revolution in the hominin lineage that took place after the split of the Pan-Homo clade. In this paper, I argue that the SCR hypothesis is wrong. The driving forces in language evolution were not sweeping biologically driven changes to hominin (...)
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  4.  45
    Imitation Reconsidered.Ellen Fridland & Richard Moore - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (6):856-880.
    In the past 20 years or so, the psychological research on imitation has flourished. However, our working definition of imitation has not adequately adapted in order to reflect this research. The closest that we've come to a revamped conception of imitation comes from the work of Michael Tomasello. Despite its numerous virtues, Tomasello's definition is in need of at least two significant amendments, if it is to reflect the current state of knowledge. Accordingly, it is our goal in this paper (...)
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  5. Production and Comprehension of Gestures Between Orang-Utans (Pongo Pygmaeus) in a Referential Communication Game.Richard Moore, Josep Call & Michael Tomasello - 2015 - PLoS ONE:pone.0129726.
    Orang-utans played a communication game in two studies testing their ability to produce and comprehend requestive pointing. While the ‘communicator’ could see but not obtain hidden food, the ‘donor’ could release the food to the communicator, but could not see its location for herself. They could coordinate successfully if the communicator pointed to the food, and if the donor comprehended his communicative goal and responded pro-socially. In Study 1, one orang-utan pointed regularly and accurately for peers. However, they responded only (...)
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  6. Gricean Communication and Cognitive Development.Richard Moore - 2017 - Philosophical Quarterly 67 (267).
    On standard readings of Grice, Gricean communication requires (a) possession of a concept of belief, (b) the ability to make complex inferences about others’ goal-directed behaviour, and (c) the ability to entertain fourth order meta-representations. To the extent that these abilities are pre-requisites of Gricean communication they are inconsistent with the view that Gricean communication could play a role in their development. In this paper, I argue that a class of ‘minimally Gricean acts’ satisfy the intentional structure described by Grice, (...)
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  7. Pragmatic Interpretation and Signaler-Receiver Asymmetries in Animal Communication.Dorit Bar-On & Richard Moore - 2017 - In Kristin Andrews Jacob Beck (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds. Routledge. pp. 291-300.
    Researchers have converged on the idea that a pragmatic understanding of communication can shed important light on the evolution of language. Accordingly, animal communication scientists have been keen to adopt insights from pragmatics research. Some authors couple their appeal to pragmatic aspects of communication with the claim that there are fundamental asymmetries between signalers and receivers in non-human animals. For example, in the case of primate vocal calls, signalers are said to produce signals unintentionally and mindlessly, whereas receivers are thought (...)
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  8. Evidence and Interpretation in Great Ape Gestural Communication.Richard Moore - 2013 - Humana Mente 6 (24):27-51.
    Tomasello and colleagues have offered various arguments to explain why apes find the comprehension of pointing difficult. They have argued that: (i) apes fail to understand communicative intentions; (ii) they fail to understand informative, cooperative communication, and (iii) they fail to track the common ground that pointing comprehension requires. In the course of a review of the literature on apes' production and comprehension of pointing, I reject (i) and (ii), and offer a qualified defence of (iii). Drawing on work on (...)
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  9.  26
    Gricean Communication, Language Development, and Animal Minds.Richard Moore - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (12):e12550.
    Humans alone acquire language. According to one influen- tial school of thought, we do this because we possess a uniquely human ability to act with and attribute “Gricean” communicative intentions. A challenge for this view is that attributing communicative intent seems to require cognitive abilities that infant language learners lack. After considering a range of responses to this challenge, I argue that infant language development can be explained, because Gricean communication is cognitively less demanding than many suppose. However, a consequence (...)
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  10. Convergent Minds: Ostension, Inference, and Grice’s Third Clause.Richard Moore - 2017 - Interface Focus 7 (3).
    A prevailing view is that while human communication has an ‘ostensive-inferential’ or ‘Gricean’ intentional structure, animal communication does not. This would make the psychological states that support human and animal forms of communication fundamentally different. Against this view, I argue that there are grounds to expect ostensive communication in non-human clades. This is because it is sufficient for ostensive communication that one intentionally address one’s utterance to one’s intended interlocutor – something that is both a functional pre-requisite of successful communication (...)
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  11.  39
    Social Learning and Teaching in Chimpanzees.Richard Moore - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (6):879-901.
    There is increasing evidence that some behavioural differences between groups of chimpanzees can be attributed neither to genetic nor to ecological variation. Such differences are likely to be maintained by social learning. While humans teach their offspring, and acquire cultural traits through imitative learning, there is little evidence of such behaviours in chimpanzees. However, by appealing only to incremental changes in motivation, attention and attention-soliciting behaviour, and without expensive changes in cognition, we can hypothesise the possible emergence of imitation and (...)
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  12.  19
    Ontogenetic Constraints on Grice's Theory of Communication.Richard Moore - 2014 - In Danielle Matthews (ed.), Pragmatic Development in First Language Acquisition. pp. 87-104.
    Paul Grice’s account of the nature of intentional communication has often been supposed to be cognitively too complex to work as an account of the communicative interactions of pre-verbal children. This chapter is a (fairly uncritical) review of a number of responses to this challenge that others have developed. I discuss work on Relevance Theory (by Sperber and Wilson), Pedagogy Theory (by Gergely and Csibra), and Expressive Communication (by Green and Bar-On). I also discuss my own response to the challenge (...)
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  13.  21
    The Evolution of Syntactic Structure. [REVIEW]Richard Moore - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (4):599-613.
    Two new books—Creating Language: Integrating Evolution, Acquisition, and Processing by Morten H. Christiansen and Nick Chater, and Why Only Us: Language and Evolution by Robert C. Berwick and Noam Chomsky—present a good opportunity to assess the state of the debate about whether or not language was made possible by language-specific adaptations for syntax. Berwick and Chomsky argue yes: language was made possible by a single change to the computation Merge. Christiansen and Chater argue no: our syntactic abilities developed on the (...)
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  14. Pedagogy and Social Learning in Human Development.Richard Moore - 2016 - In Julian Kiverstein (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of the Social Mind. Routledge. pp. 35-52.
  15.  17
    Two-Year-Olds but Not Domestic Dogs (Canis Familiaris) Understand Communicative Intentions Without Language, Gestures, or Gaze.Richard Moore, Bettina Mueller, Juliane Kaminski & Michael Tomasello - 2015 - Developmental Science 18 (2):232-242.
    Infants can see someone pointing to one of two buckets and infer that the toy they are seeking is hidden inside. Great apes do not succeed in this task, but, surprisingly, domestic dogs do. However, whether children and dogs understand these communicative acts in the same way is not yet known. To test this possibility, an experimenter did not point, look, or extend any part of her body towards either bucket, but instead lifted and shook one via a centrally pulled (...)
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  16.  18
    Reconsidering the Role of Manual Imitation in Language Evolution.Antonella Tramacere & Richard Moore - 2018 - Topoi 37 (2):319-328.
    In this paper, we distinguish between a number of different phenomena that have been called imitation, and identify one form—a high fidelity mechanism for social learning—considered to be crucial for the development of language. Subsequently, we consider a common claim in the language evolution literature, which is that prior to the emergence of vocal language our ancestors communicated using a sophisticated gestural protolanguage, the learning of some parts of which required manual imitation. Drawing upon evidence from recent work in neuroscience, (...)
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  17.  46
    Three-Year-Olds Understand Communicative Intentions Without Language, Gestures, or Gaze.Richard Moore, Kristin Liebal & Michael Tomasello - 2013 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 14 (1):62-80.
    The communicative interactions of very young children almost always involve language (based on conventions), gesture (based on bodily deixis or iconicity) and directed gaze. In this study, ninety-six children (3;0 years) were asked to determine the location of a hidden toy by understanding a communicative act that contained none of these familiar means. A light-and-sound mechanism placed behind the hiding place and illuminated by a centrally placed switch was used to indicate the location of the toy. After a communicative training (...)
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  18.  15
    Meaning and Ostension in Great Ape Gestural Communication.Richard Moore - 2016 - Animal Cognition 19 (1):223-231.
    It is sometimes argued that while human gestures are produced ostensively and intentionally, great ape gestures are produced only intentionally. If true, this would make the psychological mechanisms underlying the different species’ communication fundamentally different, and ascriptions of meaning to chimpanzee gestures would be inappropriate. While the existence of different underlying mechanisms cannot be ruled out, in fact claims about difference are driven less by empirical data than by contested assumptions about the nature of ostensive communication. On some accounts, there (...)
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  19.  12
    Restaurants, Chefs and Local Foods: Insights Drawn From Application of a Diffusion of Innovation Framework. [REVIEW]Shoshanah M. Inwood, Jeff S. Sharp, Richard H. Moore & Deborah H. Stinner - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (3):177-191.
    Chefs have been recognized as potentially important partners in efforts to promote local food systems. Drawing on the diffusion of innovation framework we (a) examine the characteristics of chefs and restaurants that have adopted local foods; (b) identified local food attributes valued by restaurants; (c) examine how restaurants function as opinion leaders promoting local foods; (d) explored network linkages between culinary and production organizations; and (e) finally, we consider some of the barriers to more widespread adoption of local foods in (...)
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  20.  31
    Exorcising Grice’s Ghost: An Empirical Approach to Studying Intentional Communication in Animals.Simon Townsend, Sonja Koski, Richard Byrne, Katie Slocombe, Balthasar Bickel, Markus Boeckle, Ines Braga Goncalves, Judith Burkart, Tom Flower, Florence Gaunet, Hans Johann Glock, Thibaud Gruber, David Jansen, Katja Liebal, Angelika Linke, Adam Miklosi, Richard Moore, Carel van Schaik, Sabine Stoll, Alex Vail, Bridget Waller, Markus Wild, Klaus Zuberühler & Marta Manser - 2016 - Biological Reviews 3.
    Language’s intentional nature has been highlighted as a crucial feature distinguishing it from other communication systems. Specifically, language is often thought to depend on highly structured intentional action and mutual mindreading by a communicator and recipient. Whilst similar abilities in animals can shed light on the evolution of intentionality, they remain challenging to detect unambiguously. We revisit animal intentional communication and suggest that progress in identifying analogous capacities has been complicated by (i) the assumption that intentional (that is, voluntary) production (...)
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  21. A Common Intentional Framework for Ape and Human Communication.Richard Moore - 2015 - Current Anthropology 56 (1):71-72.
  22. I'm a Believer. [REVIEW]Richard Moore - 2015 - Times Literary Supplement 20:xx-yy.
  23. Do Chimpanzees Conform to Cultural Norms?Laura Schlingloff & Richard Moore - 2017 - In Kristin Andrews Jacob Beck (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds. Routledge. pp. 381-389.
  24.  17
    Churchill's Bomb: How the United States Overtook Britain in the First Nuclear Arms Race. [REVIEW]Richard Moore - 2014 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 105 (2):415-415.
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  25.  21
    An Extension of the Gauss-Hertz Principle.Richard L. Moore - 1977 - Foundations of Physics 7 (1-2):129-136.
    The Gauss-Hertz principle is extended by the use of existence conditions (or constraints) to obtain a hierarchy of differential equations which include all classical equations of continuum mechanics (including electrodynamics) and the harmonic oscillator potential as well.
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  26.  21
    Further Extension of the Gauss-Hertz Principle.Richard L. Moore - 1978 - Foundations of Physics 8 (5-6):359-370.
    The continuum form of the Gauss-Hertz principle is extended to include the time domain as well as space. The Schrödinger equation and general relativity are derived by this method. The equivalence of the principle is shown to that of the Hamiltonian method where the energy is the expression −[φ∇ 2 φ+A·∇2 A], with φ being the difference between the acceleration potential and potential energy density, andA being the difference between the vector potentials of the acceleration field and the force field. (...)
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  27.  11
    Us and Them: The Science of Animal Minds. [REVIEW]Richard Moore - 2014 - Metascience 23 (3):551-554.
    Thomas Suddendorf’s The Gap: The Science of What Separates Us from Other Animals takes as its subject the question of what separates human cognition from the cognition of animals. In addition to providing a lengthy synthesis of the current state of knowledge of the differences between human and animal minds, it also contains an introduction to the history of thinking about “the gap” between us and them, and—more implicitly—an introduction to the methods of experimental science. It does not defend—at least, (...)
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  28.  8
    Cognitive Mechanisms Matter - but They Do Not Explain the Absence of Teaching in Chimpanzees.Richard Moore & Claudio Tennie - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38:e50.
  29.  5
    Lina Kahn -1965.Richard V. Moore - 1965 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 39:120 - 121.
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  30.  1
    Graham Farmelo. Churchill's Bomb: How the United States Overtook Britain in the First Nuclear Arms Race. 553 Pp., Bibl., Index. New York: Basic Books, 2013. $29.99. [REVIEW]Richard Moore - 2014 - Isis 105 (2):415-415.
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  31. Two-Year-Olds Use Adults’ but Not Peers’ Points.Gregor Kachel, Richard Moore & Michael Tomasello - 2018 - Developmental Science:1-9.
    In the current study, 24- to 27-month-old children (N = 37) used pointing gestures in a cooperative object choice task with either peer or adult partners. When indicating the location of a hidden toy, children pointed equally accurately for adult and peer partners but more often for adult partners. When choosing from one of three hiding places, children used adults’ pointing to find a hidden toy significantly more often than they used peers’. In interaction with peers, children’s choice behavior was (...)
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  32. Great Apes Search for Longer Following Humans’ Ostensive Signals, but Do Not Then Follow Their Gaze.Fumihiro Kano, Richard Moore, Chris Krupenye, Satoshi Hirata, Masaki Tomongaga & Josep Call - 2018 - Animal Cognition 21 (5):715-728.
    The previous studies have shown that human infants and domestic dogs follow the gaze of a human agent only when the agent has addressed them ostensively—e.g., by making eye contact, or calling their name. This evidence is interpreted as showing that they expect ostensive signals to precede referential information. The present study tested chimpanzees, one of the closest relatives to humans, in a series of eye-tracking experiments using an experimental design adapted from these previous studies. In the ostension conditions, a (...)
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  33. Ape Gestures: Interpreting Chimpanzee and Bonobo Minds.Richard Moore - 2014 - Current Biology 24 (12): R645-R647.
  34. Pragmatics-First Approaches to the Evolution of Language.Richard Moore - 2017 - Psychological Inquiry 28 (2-3):206-210.
  35. That Cunning Alphabet Melville's Aesthetics of Nature.Richard S. Moore - 1982
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  36. The Creation of Reality in Psychoanalysis: A View of the Contributions of Donald Spence, Roy Schafer, Robert Stolorow, Irwin Z. Hoffman, and Beyond.Richard Moore - 1999 - Routledge.
    It has become almost _de rigueur_ in contemporary psychoanalysis to cite Freud's positivism-especially his commitment to an objective reality that can be accessed through memory and interpretation-as a continuing source of weakness in bringing the field into the postmodern era. But is it so simple to move beyond Freud and objectivism in general? Or is it the case that even the most astute recent theorizing aimed at this move-and guided by therapeutic sensitivity and a concern with epistemic rigor-still betrays a (...)
     
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  37. Winning the Ph.D. Game.Richard W. Moore - 1985
     
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