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  1.  13
    Behavioral Ethics: A Critique and a Proposal.Carol Frogley Ellertson, Marc-Charles Ingerson & Richard N. Williams - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (1):145-159.
    In behavioral ethics today, there is debate as to which theory of moral development is the best for understanding ethical decision making, thereby facilitating ethical behavior. This debate between behavioral ethicists has been profoundly influenced by the field of moral psychology. Unfortunately, in the course of this marriage between moral psychology and business ethics and subsequent internal debate, a simple but critical understanding of human being in the field of management has been obscured; i.e., that morality is not a secondary (...)
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  2.  41
    Felt Moral Obligation and the Moral Judgement–Moral Action Gap: Toward a Phenomenology of Moral Life.Richard N. Williams & Edwin E. Gantt - 2012 - Journal of Moral Education 41 (4):417-435.
    The step-off point for this article is the problem of the ?moral judgement?moral action gap? as found in contemporary literature of moral education and moral development. We argue that this gap, and the conceptual problems encountered by attempts to bridge it, reflects the effect of a different, deeper and more problematic conceptual gap: the ?ontological? gap between meaningful moral events and the underlying natural structures or mechanical processes presumed to produce them. We contend that the very real fact that moral (...)
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  3.  14
    The Generality of Theory and the Specificity of Social Behavior: Contrasting Experimental and Hermeneutic Social Science.Edwin E. Gantt, Jeffrey P. Lindstrom & Richard N. Williams - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (4).
    Since its inception, experimental social psychology has arguably been of two minds about the nature and role of theory. Contemporary social psychology's experimental approach has been strongly informed by the “nomological-deductive” approach of Carl Hempel in tandem with the “hypothetico-deducive” approach of Karl Popper. Social psychology's commitment to this hybrid model of science has produced at least two serious obstacles to more fruitful theorizing about human experience: the problem of situational specificity, and the manifest impossibility of formulating meaningful general laws (...)
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  4.  20
    The Generality of Theory and the Specificity of Social Behavior: Contrasting Experimental and Hermeneutic Social Science.Edwin E. Gantt, Jeffrey P. Lindstrom & Richard N. Williams - 2017 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 47 (2):130-153.
    Since its inception, experimental social psychology has arguably been of two minds about the nature and role of theory. Contemporary social psychology's experimental approach has been strongly informed by the “nomological-deductive” approach of Carl Hempel in tandem with the “hypothetico-deducive” approach of Karl Popper. Social psychology's commitment to this hybrid model of science has produced at least two serious obstacles to more fruitful theorizing about human experience: the problem of situational specificity, and the manifest impossibility of formulating meaningful general laws (...)
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  5. The Effect of Oppositional Meaning in Incidental Learning: An Empirical Demonstration of the Dialectic.Richard N. Williams & John P. Lilly - 1985 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 6 (3).
  6.  18
    Psychology and the Legacy of Newtonianism: Motivation, Intentionality, and the Ontological Gap.Edwin E. Gantt & Richard N. Williams - 2014 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 34 (2):83-100.
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  7.  21
    The Modern, the Post-Modern, and the Question of Truth: Perspectives on the Problem of Agency.Richard N. Williams - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):25-39.
    Argues that the historical concept of agency ultimately fails since such weighing and choosing always require grounds that reach beyond private consciousness. Agency is bound inherently with morality; the modernist understanding of agency removes it from morality. It is suggested that agency is only possible on inherently moral, rather than metaphysical, grounds. An alternative conceptualization of agency as living truthfully is proposed that does not posit the existence of Cartesian ego and does not surrender to moral relativism. This concept of (...)
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  8.  3
    Methodological Naturalism, Saturation, and Psychology's Failure to Save the Phenomena.Edwin E. Gantt & Richard N. Williams - 2020 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 50 (1):84-102.
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  9.  11
    On Finding a Home for Agency.Richard N. Williams - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):83-86.
    Reviews in allegory the approaches taken to the problem of agency by contemporary perspectives in psychology and broader intellectual tradition. The author argues that agency can only be rendered sensible or possible where there is freedom from traditional determinisms and where there is real moral content. It is argued that agency will only be possible when moral relativity is overcome. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  10.  3
    Practicing the Healer’s Art.Marc-Charles Ingerson, Kristen Bell DeTienne, Edwin E. Gantt & Richard N. Williams - 2015 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 34 (1):1-22.
    This article explores the prevailing assumption of instrumentalism in negotiation and argues that contrary to the popular conception in negotiation scholarship, negotiators need not be assumed to be ontologically individualistic or purely self-interested in their motivation and action. We show the contribution that can be made to the field by an approach to negotiation that does not presume a strong and inevitable self-interest as the fundamental starting point of any account of negotiation behavior and we offer ideas for an alternative (...)
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