13 found
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  1. Moral Courage in the Workplace: Moving to and From the Desire and Decision to Act.Leslie E. Sekerka & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (2):132–149.
  2.  48
    Explaining Consumer Reactions to Corporate Social Responsibility: The Role of Gratitude and Altruistic Values. [REVIEW]Simona Romani, Silvia Grappi & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):193-206.
    Although a lot of research establishes consumer reactions to corporate social responsibility (CSR), little is known about the theoretical mechanisms for these reactions. We conduct a field experiment with adult consumers to test the hypothesis that the effects of perceived CSR on consumer reactions are mediated by felt gratitude and moderated by the magnitude of altruistic values held by consumers. Two classes of consumer reactions are considered: intentions to (1) say positive things about the company, and (2) participate in advocacy (...)
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  3.  22
    Moral Courage in the Workplace: Moving to and From the Desire and Decision to Act.Leslie E. Sekerka & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2007 - Business Ethics: A European Review 16 (2):132-149.
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  4.  19
    Corporate Socially Responsible Initiatives and Their Effects on Consumption of Green Products.Simona Romani, Silvia Grappi & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (2):253-264.
    Corporate social responsibility research has focused often on the business returns of corporate social initiatives but less on their possible social returns. We study an actual company–consumer partnership CSR initiative promoting ecologically correct and conscious consumption of bottled mineral water. We conduct a survey on adult consumers to test the hypotheses that consumer skepticism toward the company–consumer partnership CSR initiative and the moral emotion of elevation mediate the relationship between company CSR motives perceived by consumers and consumer behavioral responses following (...)
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  5. The Role of Culture and Gender in the Relationship Between Positive and Negative Affect.Richard P. Bagozzi, Nancy Wong & Youjae Yi - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (6):641-672.
  6.  13
    The More You Care, the Worthier I Feel, the Better I Behave: How and When Supervisor Support Influences (Un)Ethical Employee Behavior.Francesco Sguera, Richard P. Bagozzi, Quy N. Huy, R. Wayne Boss & David S. Boss - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):615-628.
    This article investigates the effects of perceived supervisor support on ethical and unethical employee behavior using a multi-method approach. Specifically, we test the mediating mechanism and a boundary condition that moderate the relationship between support and ethical employee behaviors. We find that supervisor-based self-esteem fully mediates the relationship between supervisor support and ethical employee behavior and that employee task satisfaction intensifies the relationship between supervisor support and supervisor-based self-esteem.
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  7.  18
    Goal-Directed Emotions.Richard P. Bagozzi & Rik Pieters - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (1):1-26.
  8.  18
    Hierarchical Motive Structures and Their Role in Moral Choices.Richard P. Bagozzi, Leslie E. Sekerka & Vanessa Hill - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S4):461 - 486.
    Leader-managers face a myriad of competing values when they engage in ethical decision-making. Few studies help us understand why certain reasons for action are justified, taking precedence over others when people choose to respond to an ethical dilemma. To help address this matter we began with a qualitative approach to disclose leader-managers' moral motives when they decide to address a work-related ethical dilemma. One hundred and nine military officers were asked to provide their reasons for taking action, justifications of their (...)
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  9.  25
    The Role of Attachment Styles in Regulating the Effects of Dopamine on the Behavior of Salespersons.Willem Verbeke, Richard P. Bagozzi & Wouter E. van den Berg - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  10. ``The Representation of Affect in Independent-and Interdependent-Based Cultures''.Richard P. Bagozzi, Nancy Wong & Youjae Yi - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (6):641-672.
  11.  16
    Exploring the Effect of Attachment Styles and Winning or Losing a Status Contest on Testosterone Levels.Willem J. Verbeke, Frank Belschak, Tsachi Ein-Dor, Richard P. Bagozzi & Michaéla Schippers - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  12.  3
    Moral Reactions to Bribery Are Fundamentally Different for Managers Witnessing and Managers Committing Such Acts: Tests of Cognitive-Emotional Explanations of Bribery.Ekta Sharma & Richard P. Bagozzi - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-30.
    We investigate how paying a bribe or refusing a bribe differs between observing others doing this or committing such acts oneself. Study 1 examines how and when observing others paying a bribe or refusing a bribe leads to actions opposing bribery or supporting anti-bribery. The how question is answered by showing that positive and negative emotions mediate such responses; the when question is answered by demonstrating that empathy and the social self-concept constitute personal conditions for regulating such effects. Study 2 (...)
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  13.  8
    Erratum To: Corporate Socially Responsible Initiatives and Their Effects on Consumption of Green Products.Simona Romani, Silvia Grappi & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (2):399-399.