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Richard Shillcock [12]Richard C. Shillcock [2]
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Richard Shillcock
University of Edinburgh
  1.  15
    Impaired Artificial Grammar Learning in Agrammatism.Morten H. Christiansen, M. Louise Kelly, Richard C. Shillcock & Katie Greenfield - 2010 - Cognition 116 (3):382-393.
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  2.  26
    Synaesthesia in a Logographic Language: The Colouring of Chinese Characters and Pinyin/Bopomo Spellings.Julia Simner, Wan-Yu Hung & Richard Shillcock - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1376-1392.
    Studies of linguistic synaesthesias in English have shown a range of fine-grained language mechanisms governing the associations between colours on the one hand, and graphemes, phonemes and words on the other. However, virtually nothing is known about how synaesthetic colouring might operate in non-alphabetic systems. The current study shows how synaesthetic speakers of Mandarin Chinese come to colour the logographic units of their language. Both native and non-native Chinese speakers experienced synaesthetic colours for characters, and for words spelled in the (...)
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  3.  6
    An Anatomically Constrained, Stochastic Model of Eye Movement Control in Reading.Scott A. McDonald, R. H. S. Carpenter & Richard C. Shillcock - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (4):814-840.
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  4.  5
    Eye-Fixation Behavior, Lexical Storage, and Visual Word Recognition in a Split Processing Model.Richard Shillcock, T. Mark Ellison & Padraic Monaghan - 2000 - Psychological Review 107 (4):824-851.
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  5.  16
    Synaesthesia in Chinese Characters: The Role of Radical Function and Position.Wan-Yu Hung, Julia Simner, Richard Shillcock & David M. Eagleman - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 24:38-48.
    Grapheme-colour synaesthetes experience unusual colour percepts when they encounter letters and/or digits. Studies of English-speaking grapheme-colour synaesthetes have shown that synaesthetic colours are sometimes triggered by rule-based linguistic mechanisms . In contrast, little is known about synaesthesia in logographic languages such as Chinese. The current study shows the mechanisms by which synaesthetic speakers of Chinese colour their language. One hypothesis is that Chinese characters might be coloured by their constituent morphological units, known as radicals, and we tested this by eliciting (...)
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  6.  5
    Mirror Neurons, Prediction and Hemispheric Coordination: The Prioritizing of Intersubjectivity Over ‘Intrasubjectivity’.Richard Shillcock, James Thomas & Rachael Bailes - 2019 - Axiomathes 29 (2):139-153.
    We observe that approaches to intersubjectivity, involving mirror neurons and involving emulation and prediction, have eclipsed discussion of those same mechanisms for achieving coordination between the two hemispheres of the human brain. We explore some of the implications of the suggestion that the mutual modelling of the two situated hemispheres is a productive place to start in understanding the phylogenetic and ontogenetic development of cognition and of intersubjectivity.
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  7.  4
    Hemispheric Asymmetries in Cognitive Modeling: Connectionist Modeling of Unilateral Visual Neglect.Padraic Monaghan & Richard Shillcock - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (2):283-308.
  8.  36
    The Concrete Universal and Cognitive Science.Richard Shillcock - 2014 - Axiomathes 24 (1):63-80.
    Cognitive science depends on abstractions made from the complex reality of human behaviour. Cognitive scientists typically wish the abstractions in their theories to be universals, but seldom attend to the ontology of universals. Two sorts of universal, resulting from Galilean abstraction and materialist abstraction respectively, are available in the philosophical literature: the abstract universal—the one-over-many universal—is the universal conventionally employed by cognitive scientists; in contrast, a concrete universal is a material entity that can appear within the set of entities it (...)
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  9.  23
    From Corpora to Cuttlefish.Peter Hancock & Richard Shillcock - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (2):57-58.
  10.  25
    Interaction, Function Words, and the Wider Goals of Speech Perception.Richard Shillcock - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):346-346.
    We urge caution in generalising from content words to function words, in which lexical-to-phonemic feedback might be more likely. Speech perception involves more than word recognition; feedback might be outside the narrow logic of word identification but still be present for other purposes. Finally, we raise the issue of evidence from imaging studies of auditory hallucination.
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  11.  10
    Phonological Reduction, Assimilation, Intra-Word Information Structure, and the Evolution of the Lexicon of English: Why Fast Speech Isn't Confusing.Richard Shillcock, John Hicks, Paul Cairns, Nick Chater & Joseph P. Levy - 1996 - In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 233.
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  12.  16
    Reading and the Split Fovea.Richard Shillcock, Scott McDonald & Padraic Monaghan - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):503-503.
    We argue that models of reading should be based on anatomical reality, namely, the fact that both eyes are used in reading; and the observation that the human fovea is precisely vertically split, and projects each half of a fixated word to the contralateral hemisphere.
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  13. Eye Movements and Visual Word Recogntion.Richard Shillcock - 2009 - In Gareth Gaskell (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Psycholinguistics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  14.  12
    Bihemispheric Representation, Foveal Splitting, and Visual Word Recognition.Richard Shillcock & Padraic Monaghan - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):300-301.
    Pulvermüller's account of lexical representation has implications for visual word recognition, given the claim we make that a foveally presented word is precisely split and contralaterally projected to the two hemispheres, and that this splitting conditions the whole process of visual word recognition. This elaboration of Pulvermüller's account raises issues of hemispheric differences and collaboration.
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