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Richard Slack [8]Richard E. Slack [1]
  1.  36
    Corporate Philanthropy as a Context for Moral Agency, a MacIntyrean Enquiry.Helen Nicholson, Ron Beadle & Richard Slack - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (3):589-603.
    It has been claimed that ‘virtuous structures’ can foster moral agency in organisations. We investigate this in the context of employee involvement in corporate philanthropy, an activity whose moral status has been disputed. Employing Alasdair MacIntyre’s account of moral agency, we analyse the results of eight focus groups with employees engaged in corporate philanthropy in an employee-owned retailer, the John Lewis Partnership. Within this organisational context, Employee–Partners’ moral agency was evidenced in narrative accounts of their engagement in philanthropic activities and (...)
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  2. Public visibility as a determinant of the rate of corporate charitable donations.David Campbell & Richard Slack - 2005 - Business Ethics: A European Review 15 (1):19-28.
  3.  13
    Corporate “Philanthropy Strategy” and “Strategic Philanthropy”: Some Insights From Voluntary Disclosures in Annual Reports.David Campbell & Richard Slack - 2008 - Business and Society 47 (2):187-212.
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  4.  32
    The strategic use of corporate philanthropy: Building societies and demutualisation defences.David Campbell & Richard Slack - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (4):326–343.
    This paper examines the strategic use of corporate philanthropy in the 1990s by UK building societies faced with an intensification of societal pressure to change legal form from mutual to corporate status. While the economic case for mutuality has been made elsewhere, this paper examines the observation that community relationships were thought by management to be capable of assisting in the strategic positioning of mutual societies with regard to their legal form. By increasing charitable giving to respond to the level (...)
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  5.  18
    The strategic use of corporate philanthropy: building societies and demutualisation defences.David Campbell & Richard Slack - 2007 - Business Ethics: A European Review 16 (4):326-343.
    This paper examines the strategic use of corporate philanthropy in the 1990s by UK building societies faced with an intensification of societal pressure to change legal form from mutual to corporate status. While the economic case for mutuality has been made elsewhere, this paper examines the observation that community relationships were thought by management to be capable of assisting in the strategic positioning of mutual societies with regard to their legal form. By increasing charitable giving to respond to the level (...)
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  6.  64
    Criteria for Responsible Business Practice in SMEs: An Exploratory Case of U.K. Fair Trade Organisations.Geoff Moore, Richard Slack & Jane Gibbon - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):173-188.
    This paper develops a set of 16 criteria, divided into four groupings, for responsible business practice (RBP) in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) drawn from the existing SME/RBP literature. The current lack of a general set of criteria against which such activity can be judged is noted and this deficit is redressed. In order to make an initial assessment in support of the criteria so derived, an exploratory feasibility study of RBP in U.K. Fair Trade organisations was conducted. The findings (...)
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  7.  21
    The Influence of Mutual Status on Rates of Corporate Charitable Contributions.David Campbell & Richard Slack - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):191-200.
    The claims by the Building Societies Association (BSA), some mutual building societies and other observers that mutual status is associated with higher levels of charitable and community involvement than public status banks are tested using the proxy of charitable donations in cash as a proportion of profits before tax (PBT). Using a sample of 31 of the remaining 65 mutual societies and the population of U.K.-based retail banks and still-independent demutualised banks, two hypotheses were tested: first, that charitable giving as (...)
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  8.  27
    “It’s Us, You Know, There’s a Feeling of Community”: Exploring Notions of Community in a Consumer Co-operative.Victoria Wells, Nick Ellis, Richard Slack & Mona Moufahim - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (3):617-635.
    The notion of community infers unity and a source of moral obligations in an organisational ethic between individuals or groups. As such, a community, having a strong sense of collective identity, may foster collective action to promote social change for the betterment of society. This research critically explores notions of community through analysing discursive identity construction practices within a member-owned urban consumer co-operative public house in the UK. A strong sense of community is an often-claimed CC characteristic. The paper’s main (...)
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  9.  71
    Crisis Management and an Ethic of Care: The Case of Northern Rock Bank. [REVIEW]Philip M. Linsley & Richard E. Slack - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):285-295.
    Different ethical frameworks have been proposed as appropriate for integrating into crisis management strategies. This study examines an ethic of care approach to crisis management analysing the case of Northern Rock bank which was at the centre of the recent financial crisis in the UK. The development and maintenance of relationships is fundamental to an ethic of care approach and the research recognises this by examining the bank–stakeholder relationship both before and after the crisis. Considerable anger was directed at the (...)
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