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Richard Swinburne [260]Richard G. Swinburne [1]
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  1. The Existence of God.Richard Swinburne - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of the existence of God. Swinburne gives a rigorous and penetrating analysis of the most important arguments for theism: the cosmological argument; arguments from the existence of laws of nature and the 'fine-tuning' of the universe; from the occurrence of consciousness and moral awareness; and from miracles and religious experience. He claims that while none (...)
  2.  66
    Providence and the Problem of Evil.Richard Swinburne - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Richard Swinburne offers an answer to one of the most difficult problems of religious belief: why does a loving God allow humans to suffer so much? It is the final instalment of Swinburne's acclaimed four-volume philosophical examination of Christian doctrine.
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  3. Epistemic Justification.Richard Swinburne - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Richard Swinburne offers an original treatment of a question at the heart of epistemology: what makes a belief rational, or justified in holding? He maps the rival accounts of philosophers on epistemic justification ("internalist" and "externalist"), arguing that they are really accounts of different concepts. He distinguishes between synchronic justification (justification at a time) and diachronic justification (synchronic justification resulting from adequate investigation)--both internalist and externalist. He also argues that most kinds of justification are worth having because they are indicative (...)
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  4.  42
    The Existence of God.Richard Swinburne - 2004 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of the existence of God. Swinburne gives a rigorous and penetrating analysis of the most important arguments for theism: the cosmological argument; arguments from the existence of laws of nature and the 'fine-tuning' of the universe; from the occurrence of consciousness and moral awareness; and from miracles and religious experience. He claims that while none (...)
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  5.  94
    The Coherence of Theism (Revised Edition).Richard Swinburne - 1977 - Oxford University Press.
    This book investigates what it means, and whether it is coherent, to say that there is a God.
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  6. The Evolution of the Soul.Richard Swinburne - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a revised and updated version of Swinburne's controversial treatment of the eternal philosophical problem of the relation between mind and body. He argues that we can only make sense of the interaction between the mental and the physical in terms of the soul, and that there is no scientific explanation of the evolution of the soul.
  7. The Christian God.Richard Swinburne - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    What is it for there to be a God, and what reason is there for supposing him to conform to the claims of Christian doctrine? In this pivotal volume of his tetralogy, Richard Swinburne builds a rigorous metaphysical system for describing the world, and applies this to assessing the worth of the Christian tenets of the Trinity and the Incarnation. Part I is dedicated to analyzing the categories needed to address accounts of the divine nature--substance, cause, time, and necessity. Part (...)
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  8.  92
    Responsibility and Atonement.Richard Swinburne - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    According to how we treat others, we acquire merit or guilt, deserve praise or blame, and receive reward or punishment, looking in the end for atonement. In this study distinguished theological philosopher Richard Swinburne examines how these moral concepts apply to humans in their dealings with each other, and analyzes these findings, determining which versions of traditional Christian doctrines--sin and original sin, redemption, sanctification, and heaven and hell--are considered morally acceptable.
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  9.  80
    Mind, Brain, and Free Will.Richard Swinburne - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Richard Swinburne presents a powerful new case for substance dualism and for libertarian free will. He argues that pure mental events are distinct from physical events and interact with them, and claims that no result from neuroscience or any other science could show that interaction does not take place. Swinburne goes on to argue for agent causation, and claims that it is we, and not our intentions, that cause our brain events. It is metaphysically possible that each of us could (...)
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  10.  44
    The Resurrection of God Incarnate.Richard Swinburne - 2003 - Clarendon Press.
    Reasons for believing that Jesus rose from the dead.
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  11. Hume’s Abject Failure: The Argument Against Miracles.Richard Swinburne - 2002 - Mind 111 (441):95-99.
  12. Are We Bodies or Souls?Richard Swinburne - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    What makes us human? Richard Swinburne presents new philosophical arguments, supported by modern neuroscience, for the view that we are immaterial souls sustained in existence by our brains.
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  13. God-Talk is Not Evidently Nonsense.Richard Swinburne - 2000 - In Brian Davies (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press. pp. 147--52.
     
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  14.  37
    Faith and Reason.Richard Swinburne - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Richard Swinburne presents a new edition of the final volume of his acclaimed trilogy on philosophical theology. Faith and Reason is a self-standing examination of the implications for religious faith of Swinburne's famous arguments about the coherence of theism and the existence of God.By practising a particular religion, a person seeks to achieve some or all of three goals - that he worships and obeys God, gains salvation for himself, and helps others to attain their salvation. But not all religions (...)
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  15.  37
    The Social Theory of the Trinity.Richard Swinburne - 2018 - Religious Studies 54 (3):419-437.
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  16.  85
    Is There a God?Richard Swinburne - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to (...)
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  17. Book Review. [REVIEW]Richard Swinburne - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):46-53.
  18. Personal identity.Sydney Shoemaker, Richard Swinburne, David Armstrong, Norman Malcolm & Richard Bernstein - 1985 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 175 (4):567-569.
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  19. Faith and Reason.Richard Swinburne - 1981 - Oxford University Press.
    "Faith and Reason is the final volume of a trilogy on philosophical theology.
  20.  21
    Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy (Second Edition).Richard Swinburne - 2009 - Philosophia Christi 11 (1):249 - 252.
    The great religions often claim that their books or creeds contain truths revealed by God. How could we know that they do? In the second edition of Revelation, renowned philosopher of religion Richard Swinburne addresses this central question. But since the books of great religions often contain much poetry and parable, Swinburne begins by investigating how eternal truth can be conveyed in unfamiliar genres, by analogy and metaphor, within false presuppositions about science and history. In the final part of the (...)
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  21.  7
    The Existence of God.Richard Swinburne - 1981 - Philosophical Quarterly 31 (122):85-88.
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  22. Simplicity as Evidence of Truth.Richard Swinburne - 1997
  23. Was Jesus God?Richard Swinburne - 2008 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The orderliness of the universe and the existence of human beings already provides some reason for believing that there is a God - as argued in Richard Swinburne's earlier book Is There a God? Swinburne now claims that it is probable that the main Christian doctrines about the nature of God and his actions in the world are true. In virtue of his omnipotence and perfect goodness, God must be a Trinity, live a human life in order to share our (...)
     
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  24.  23
    Stump On Forgiveness.Richard Swinburne - 2019 - Faith and Philosophy 36 (4):512-521.
    I claim that all the criticisms made by Eleonore Stump in her Atonement of my account of the nature and justification of human and divine forgiveness are entirely mistaken. She claims that God’s forgiveness of our sins is always immediate and unconditional. I argue that on Christ’s understanding of forgiveness as deeming the sinner not to have wronged one, God’s forgiveness of us is always conditional on our repenting and being willing to forgive others. Her account of forgiveness merely as (...)
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  25. Personal Identity.Sydney Shoemaker & Richard Swinburne - 1986 - Ethics 96 (3):641-643.
     
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  26. .Richard Swinburne - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
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  27. The Argument to God From Fine-Tuning Reassessed.Richard Swinburne - 2003 - In Neil A. Manson (ed.), God and Design: The Teleological Argument and Modern Science. Routledge. pp. 80--105.
    It is most improbable a priori that laws of nature should have a form, and their constants have values, and the variables of the boundary conditions of our universe should have values, of such a kind as to lead to the evolution of human bodies. If there is a God it is quite probable that there would be human bodies. Our only grounds for believing that there are other universes, are grounds for believing that those universes are governed by the (...)
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  28. From Mental/Physical Identity to Substance Dualism.Richard Swinburne - 2007 - In Peter van Inwagen & Dean Zimmerman (eds.), Persons: Human and Divine. Clarendon Press.
     
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  29.  76
    Phenomenal Conservatism and Religious Experience.Richard Swinburne - 2018 - In Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne & Dani Rabinowitz (eds.), Knowledge, Belief, and God: New Insights in Religious Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 322-338.
  30.  3
    Language and Time.Richard Swinburne - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (2):486-489.
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  31. What Kind of Necessary Being Could God Be?Richard Swinburne - 2012 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 4 (2):1--18.
    A logically impossible sentence is one which entails a contradiction, a logically necessary sentence is one whose negation entails a contradiction, and a logically possible sentence is one which does not entail a contradiction. Metaphysically impossible, necessary and possible sentences are ones which become logically impossible, necessary, or possible by substituting what I call informative rigid designators for uninformative ones. It does seem very strongly that a negative existential sentence cannot entail a contradiction, and so ”there is a God’ cannot (...)
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  32. Free Will and Modern Science.Richard Swinburne (ed.) - 2011 - OUP/British Academy.
    Do humans have a free choice of which actions to perform? Three recent developments of modern science can help us to answer this question. First, new investigative tools have enabled us to study the processes in our brains which accompanying our decisions. The pioneer work of Benjamin Libet has led many neuroscientists to hold the view that our conscious intentions do not cause our bodily movements but merely accompany them. Then, Quantum Theory suggests that not all physical events are fully (...)
     
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  33. Thisness.Richard Swinburne - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):389 – 400.
    The principle of the identity of indiscernibles holds that two individuals are the same individual if they have all the same properties. There are different forms of the principle, varying with what is allowed to count as a property. An individual has thisness if the weakest form of the principle does not apply to it. Abstract objects, places and times do not have thisness. Inanimate material objects probably do not. Animate beings, and the conscious events which involve them do have (...)
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  34. God As the Simplest Explanation of the Universe.Richard Swinburne - 2010 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (1):1 - 24.
    Inanimate explanation is to be analysed in terms of substances having powers and liabilities to exercise their powers under certain conditions; while personal explanation is to be analysed in terms of persons, their beliefs, powers, and purposes. A crucial criterion for an explanation being probably true is that it is (among explanations leading us to expect the data) the simplest one. Simplicity is a matter of few substances, few kinds of substances, few properties (including powers and liabilities), few kinds of (...)
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  35. Relations Between Universals,or Divine Laws?Richard Swinburne - 2006 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (2):179 – 189.
    Armstrong's theory of laws of nature as relations between universals gives an initially plausible account of why the causal powers of substances are bound together only in certain ways, so that the world is a very regular place. But its resulting theory of causation cannot account for intentional causation, since this involves an agent trying to do something, and trying is causing. This kind of causation is thus a state of an agent and does not involve the operation of a (...)
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  36. Personal Identity.Sydney Shoemaker & Richard Swinburne - 1985 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 18 (3):184-185.
     
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  37. Plantinga on Warrant.Richard Swinburne - 2001 - Religious Studies 37 (2):203-214.
    Alvin Plantinga Warranted Christian Belief (New York NY: Oxford University Press, 2000). In the two previous volumes of his trilogy on ‘warrant’, Alvin Plantinga developed his general theory of warrant, defined as that characteristic enough of which terms a true belief into knowledge. A belief B has warrant if and only if: (1) it is produced by cognitive faculties functioning properly, (2) in a cognitive environment sufficiently similar to that for which the faculties were designed, (3) according to a design (...)
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  38. Body and Soul: Swinburne Body and Soul.Richard Swinburne - 2003 - Think 2 (5):31-36.
    Richard Swinburne here defends the view that mind and body are distinct substances capable of independent existence. For a very different approach to the question of how mind and body are related contrast Rowland Stout's ‘Behaviourism’, which follows this article.
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  39. What Kind of Necessary Being Could God Be?Richard Swinburne - 2012 - In Miroslaw Szatkowski (ed.), Ontological Proofs Today. Ontos Verlag. pp. 345.
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  40.  70
    Necessary Moral Principles.Richard Swinburne - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (4):617--634.
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  41. Is Goodness Without God Good Enough?: A Debate on Faith, Secularism, and Ethics.Louise Antony, William Lane Craig, John Hare, Donald C. Hubin, Paul Kurtz, C. Stephen Layman, Mark C. Murphy, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Richard Swinburne - 2009 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Is Goodness Without God Good Enough contains a lively debate between William Lane Craig and Paul Kurtz on the relationship between God and ethics, followed by seven new essays that both comment on the debate and advance the broader discussion of this important issue. Written in an accessible style by eminent scholars, this book will appeal to students and academics alike.
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  42. Gwiazda on the Bayesian Argument for God.Richard Swinburne - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2):393-396.
    Jeremy Gwiazda made two criticisms of my formulation in terms of Bayes’s theorem of my probabilistic argument for the existence of God. The first criticism depends on his assumption that I claim that the intrinsic probabilities of all propositions depend almost entirely on their simplicity; however, my claim is that that holds only insofar as those propositions are explanatory hypotheses. The second criticism depends on a claim that the intrinsic probabilities of exclusive and exhaustive explanatory hypotheses of a phenomenon must (...)
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  43. God and Morality.Richard Swinburne - 2008 - Think 7 (20):7-15.
    The first six articles in this issue of THINK have the theme . Here, Richard Swinburne argues that the existence of God is not a precondition of there being moral truths, but his existence does impact on what moral truths there are.
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  44. Substance Dualism.Richard Swinburne - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (5):501 - 513.
    Events are the instantiations of properties in substances at times. A full history of the world must include, as well as physical events, mental events (ones to which the substance involved has privileged access) and mental substances (ones to the existence of which the substance has privileged access), and, among the latter, pure mental substances (ones which do not include a physical substance as an essential part). Humans are pure mental substances. An argument for this is that it seems conceivable (...)
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  45. The Beginning of the Universe and of Time.Richard Swinburne - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):169 - 189.
    Given four modest verificationist theses, tying the meaning of talk about instants and periods to the events which (physically) could occur during, before or after them, the only content to the claim the Universe had a beginning (applicable equally to chaotic or orderly universes) is in terms of it being preceded by empty time. It follows that time cannot have a beginning. The Universe, however, could have a beginning--even if it has lasted for an infinite time.
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  46. Prior Probabilities in the Argument From Fine-Tuning.Richard Swinburne - 2005 - Faith and Philosophy 22 (5):641 - 653.
    Theism is a far simpler hypothesis, and so a priori more probably true, than naturalism, understood as the hypothesis that the existence of this law-governed universe has no explanation. Theism postulates only one entity (God) with very simple properties, whereas naturalism has to postulate either innumerable entities all having the same properties, or one very complicated entity with the power to produce the former. If theism is true, it is moderately probable that God would create humanoid beings and so humanoid (...)
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  47.  47
    Could Anyone Justifiably Believe Epiphenomenalism?Richard Swinburne - 2011 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (3-4):196--216.
    Epiphenomenalism claims that all conscious events are caused immediately by brain events, and no conscious events cause brain events. In order to have a justified belief in a theory someone needs a justified belief that it or some higher-level theory predicts certain events and those events occurred. To have either of the latter beliefs we depend ultimately on the evidence of apparent experience, memory, and testimony, which is credible in the absence of defeaters; it is an undermining defeater to a (...)
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  48.  50
    Miracles.Richard Swinburne (ed.) - 1989 - Macmillan.
  49.  9
    God and Morality.Richard Swinburne - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (S1):553-566.
    I'm not going to discuss whether or not there is a God, but simply whether if there is a God, that makes any difference to morality. I shall argue first that the existence and actions of God would make no difference to the fact that there are moral truths—and on this you may already agree with me. But I shall go on to argue that the existence and actions of God would make a great difference to the content of morality, (...)
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  50. A Posteriori Arguments for the Trinity.Richard Swinburne - 2013 - Studia Neoaristotelica 10 (1):13-27.
    There is a good a priori argument for the doctrine of the Trinity, from the need for any divine being to have another divine being to love suffi ciently to provide for him a third divine being whom to love and by whom to be loved. But most people who have believed the doctrine of the Trinity have believed it on the basis of the teaching of Jesus as interpreted by the church. The only reason for believing this teaching would (...)
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