17 found
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  1. Machiavellian Intelligence: Social Expertise and the Evolution of Intellect in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans.Richard W. Byrne & Andrew Whiten (eds.) - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    This book presents an alternative to conventional ideas about the evolution of the human intellect.
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  2.  2
    The Thinking Ape: Evolutionary Origins of Intelligence.Richard W. Byrne - 1995 - Oxford University Press UK.
    "Intelligence" has long been considered to be a feature unique to human beings, giving us the capacity to imagine, to think, to deceive, to make complex connections between cause and effect, to devise elaborate stategies for solving problems. However, like all our other features, intelligence is a product of evolutionary change. Until recently, it was difficult to obtain evidence of this process from the frail testimony of a few bones and stone tools. It has become clear in the last 15 (...)
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  3.  48
    Learning by Imitation: A Hierarchical Approach.Richard W. Byrne & Anne E. Russon - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):667-684.
    To explain social learning without invoking the cognitively complex concept of imitation, many learning mechanisms have been proposed. Borrowing an idea used routinely in cognitive psychology, we argue that most of these alternatives can be subsumed under a single process, priming, in which input increases the activation of stored internal representations. Imitation itself has generally been seen as a This has diverted much research towards the all-or-none question of whether an animal can imitate, with disappointingly inconclusive results. In the great (...)
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  4.  58
    Differentiation in Cognitive and Emotional Meanings: An Evolutionary Analysis.Philip J. Barnard, David J. Duke, Richard W. Byrne & Iain Davidson - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1155-1183.
  5.  11
    Evolution of Primate Cognition.Richard W. Byrne - 2000 - Cognitive Science 24 (3):543-570.
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  6.  82
    Understanding Culture Across Species.Richard W. Byrne, Philip J. Barnard, Iain Davidson, Vincent M. Janik, William C. McGrew, Ádam Miklósi & Polly Wiessner - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (8):341-346.
  7. What's the Use of Anecdotes? Attempts to Distinguish Psychological Mechanisms in Primate Tactical Deception.Richard W. Byrne - 1997 - In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. pp. 134--150.
     
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  8. Animal Cognition in Nature, Edited by Russell P. Balda, Irene M. Pepperberg and Alan C. Kamil.Richard W. Byrne - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):73-73.
  9.  47
    Common Ground on Which to Approach the Origins of Higher Cognition.Richard W. Byrne & Anne E. Russon - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):709-717.
    Imitation research has been hindered by (1) overly molecular analyses of behaviour that ignore hierarchical structure, and (2) attempts to disqualify observational evidence. Program-level imitation is one of a range of cognitive skills for scheduling efficient novel behaviour, in particular, enabling an individual to purloin the organization of another's behaviour for its own. To do so, the individual must perceive the underlying hierarchical schedule of the fluid action it observes and must understand the local functions of subroutines within the overall (...)
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  10. Culture in Great Apes: Using Intricate Complexity in Feeding Skills to Trace the Evolutionary Origin of Human Technical Prowess.Richard W. Byrne - 2007 - In Nathan Emery, Nicola Clayton & Chris Frith (eds.), Social Intelligence: From Brain to Culture. Oxford University Press.
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  11. Evolving Insight: How We Can Think About Why Things Happen.Richard W. Byrne - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    'Insight' is not a very popular word in psychology or biology. Popular terms-like "intelligence", "planning", "complexity" or "cognitive"- have a habit of sprawling out to include everyone's favourite interpretation, and end up with such vague meanings that each new writer has to redefine them for use. Insight remains in everyday usage: as a down-to-earth, lay term for a deep, shrewd or discerning kind of understanding. Insight is a good thing to have, so it's important to find out how it evolved, (...)
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  12. Evolutionary Psychology and Primate Cognition.Richard W. Byrne - 2002 - In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 393--398.
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  13.  14
    Having the Imagination to Suffer, and to Prevent Suffering.Richard W. Byrne - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):15-16.
  14. Novelty in Deceit.Richard W. Byrne - 2003 - In Simon M. Reader & Kevin N. Laland (eds.), Animal Innovation. Oxford University Press.
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  15.  26
    Primate Cognition: Evidence for the Ethical Treatment of Primates.Richard W. Byrne - 1999 - In Francine L. Dolins (ed.), Attitudes to Animals: Views in Animal Welfare. Cambridge University Press. pp. 114--125.
  16.  17
    So Much Easier to Attack Straw Men.Richard W. Byrne - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):116-117.
    Rather than dealing with the important issues in the interpretation of behavioural data, Heyes seems only to reiterate lessons well-learned before she first reviewed the topic of primate deception. She also appears to misrepresent a series of published analyses. Despite her emphatic denials, the commonsense view is the best: informed observations and experiments can both provide evidence of theory of mind.
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  17.  2
    Mate Selection: The Wrong Control Group.Jeff Graves & Richard W. Byrne - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):527-528.
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