Results for 'Rick Deady'

788 found
Order:
  1.  46
    Moral Distress Reconsidered.Joan McCarthy & Rick Deady - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (2):254-262.
    Moral distress has received much attention in the international nursing literature in recent years. In this article, we describe the evolution of the concept of moral distress among nursing theorists from its initial delineation by the philosopher Jameton to its subsequent deployment as an umbrella concept describing the impact of moral constraints on health professionals and the patients for whom they care. The article raises worries about the way in which the concept of moral distress has been portrayed in some (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   82 citations  
  2.  45
    A Market Price for Organs?Rick Thomas - 2013 - The New Bioethics 19 (2):111-129.
    Has not the time fully come to lift the prohibition on a regulated market in organs for transplantation? Is there a price for such a market that would be too high to pay? The author revisits the cases for and against organ markets in the light of cultural shifts in society and asks whether the traditional insistence on altruism represents a hindrance to much needed developments or a safeguard for much valued public goods.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  44
    Is priesthood an adaptive strategy?Denis K. Deady, Miriam J. Law Smith, J. P. Kent & R. I. M. Dunbar - 2006 - Human Nature 17 (4):393-404.
    This study examines the socioeconomic and familial background of Irish Catholic priests born between 1867 and 1911. Previous research has hypothesized that lack of marriage opportunities may influence adoption of celibacy as part of a religious institution. The present study traced data from Irish seminary registries for 46 Catholic priests born in County Limerick, Ireland, using 1901 Irish Census returns and Land Valuation records. Priests were more likely to originate from landholding backgrounds, and with landholdings greater in size and wealth (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Confessions of an Ex-Beauty Queen: Some Simple Lessons For the Profession.Rick Szostak - 2000 - In Craig Freedman & Rick Szostak (eds.), Tales of Narcissus: The Looking Glass of Economic Science. Nova Science Publishers. pp. 237.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. New Materialism: Interviews and Cartographies.Rick Dolphijn & Iris van der Tuin - 2012 - Open Humanities Press.
  6.  24
    Diagnostic hypothesis generation and human judgment.Rick P. Thomas, Michael R. Dougherty, Amber M. Sprenger & J. Isaiah Harbison - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (1):155-185.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  7. The semantic challenge to computational neuroscience.Rick Grush - 2001 - In Peter McLaughlin, Peter Machamer & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. Pittsburgh University Press. pp. 155--172.
    I examine one of the conceptual cornerstones of the field known as computational neuroscience, especially as articulated in Churchland et al. (1990), an article that is arguably the locus classicus of this term and its meaning. The authors of that article try, but I claim ultimately fail, to mark off the enterprise of computational neuroscience as an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the cognitive, information-processing functions of the brain. The failure is a result of the fact that the authors provide no (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  8.  50
    Stranger in a strange land: an optimal-environments account of evolutionary mismatch.Rick Morris - 2020 - Synthese 197 (9):4021-4046.
    In evolutionary medicine, researchers characterize some outcomes as evolutionary mismatch. Mismatch problems arise as the result of organisms living in environments to which they are poorly adapted, typically as the result of some rapid environmental change. Depression, anxiety, obesity, myopia, insomnia, breast cancer, dental problems, and numerous other negative health outcomes have all been characterized as mismatch problems. The exact nature of evolutionary mismatch itself is unclear, however. This leads to a lack of clarity about the sorts of problems that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9. The emulation theory of representation: Motor control, imagery, and perception.Rick Grush - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):377-396.
    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by efference copies in (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   265 citations  
  10.  27
    Immortality, the Good Life and Romantic Love in Groundhog Day and Only Lovers Left Alive.Rick Zinman - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):411-431.
    Groundhog Day (Harold Ramis, 1993) and Only Lovers Left Alive (Jim Jarmusch, 2013) are fantasy films that use the device of practical immortality in order to raise important philosophical questions about what constitutes a good life and to explore the nature of romantic love. Groundhog Day provides fairly conventional answers about how to live a good life by focusing on issues of spiritual redemption, selflessness, and developing one’s human potential. In contrast, Lovers provides a dark portrayal of a civilization on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Explanatory pluralism in cognitive science.Rick Dale, Eric Dietrich & Anthony Chemero - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (2):739-742.
    This brief commentary has three goals. The first is to argue that ‘‘framework debate’’ in cognitive science is unresolvable. The idea that one theory or framework can singly account for the vast complexity and variety of cognitive processes seems unlikely if not impossible. The second goal is a consequence of this: We should consider how the various theories on offer work together in diverse contexts of investigation. A final goal is to supply a brief review for readers who are compelled (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  12. Gaps in Penrose's toiling.Rick Grush & Patricia Smith Churchland - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (1):10-29.
    Using the Godel incompleteness result for leverage, Roger Penrose has argued that the mechanism for consciousness involves quantum gravitational phenomena, acting through microtubules in neurons. We show that this hypothesis is implausible. First the Godel result does not imply that human thought is in fact non-algorithmic. Second, whether or not non-algorithmic quantum gravitational phenomena actually exist, and if they did how that could conceivably implicate microtubules, and if microtubules were involved, how that could conceivably implicate consciousness, is entirely speculative. Third, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  13. Bayesian inference, predictive coding and delusions.Rick A. Adams, Harriet R. Brown & Karl J. Friston - 2014 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 5 (3):51-88.
  14. Brain Time and Phenomenological Time.Rick Grush - 2005 - In Andrew Brook & Kathleen Akins (eds.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge University Press. pp. 160.
    ... there are cases in which on the basis of a temporally extended content of consciousness a unitary apprehension takes place which is spread out over a temporal interval (the so-called specious present). ... That several successive tones yield a melody is possible only in this way, that the succession of psychical processes are united "forthwith" in a common structure.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  15.  26
    Body-centered representations for visually-guided action emerge during early infancy.Rick O. Gilmore & Mark H. Johnson - 1997 - Cognition 65 (1):B1-B9.
  16.  3
    Vasari's Lepanto Frescoes: Apparati, Medals, Prints and the Celebration of Victory.Rick Scorza - 2012 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 75 (1):141-200.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  8
    The Promise and Pitfalls of Algorithmic Governance for Developing Societies.Rick Searle - 2016 - Postmodern Openings 7 (1):171-176.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  13
    The philosophy of matter: a meditation.Rick Dolphijn - 2021 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    The Philosophy of Matter is a journey in thinking through the material fate of the earth itself; its surfaces and undercurrrents, ecologies, environments and irreparable cracks. With figures such as Spinoza, Gilles Deleuze and Michel Serres as philosophical guides and writings on New Materialism, Posthumanism and Affect Theory as intellectual context, Rick Dolphijn proposes a radical rethinking of some of the basic themes of philosophy: subjectivity, materiality, body (both human and otherwise) and the act of living. This rethink is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  7
    Rick Sammon's Digital Photography Secrets.Rick Sammon - 2008 - Wiley.
    Learn the tips and tricks used by a top photographer in the digital photography industry in Rick Sammon's Top Digital Photography Secrets. Filled with beautiful photographs and the techniques Rick Sammon used to capture them, this book offers you motivation to capture stunning photographs and the tools and tricks you need to capture them. With more than 100 techniques for use behind the camera, this book will improve the camera skills of both amateur and experienced photographers. Additionally, this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  25
    Effective aspects of profinite groups.Rick L. Smith - 1981 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 46 (4):851-863.
    Profinite groups are Galois groups. The effective study of infinite Galois groups was initiated by Metakides and Nerode [8] and further developed by LaRoche [5]. In this paper we study profinite groups without considering Galois extensions of fields. The Artin method of representing a finite group as a Galois group has been generalized by Waterhouse [14] to profinite groups. Thus, there is no loss of relevance in our approach.The fundamental notions of a co-r.e. profinite group, recursively profinite group, and the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. Rick Sammon's Canon Eos Digital Rebel Personal Training Photo Workshop.Rick Sammon - 2007 - Wiley.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Rick Sammon's Dvd Guide to Using the Canon Eos Rebel Xsi/450d.Rick Sammon - 2008 - Wiley.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  20
    Rick Sammon's Hdr Secrets for Digital Photographers.Rick Sammon - 2010 - Wiley.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  11
    Michel Serres and the crisis of the contemporary.Rick Dolphijn (ed.) - 2017 - Bloomsbury.
    Michel Serres captures the urgencies of our time; from the digital revolution to the ecological crisis to the future of the university, the crises that code the world today are addressed in an accessible, affirmative and remarkably original analysis in his thought. This volume is the first to engage with the philosophy of Michel Serres, not by writing 'about' it, but by writing 'with' it. This is done by expanding upon the urgent themes that Serres works on; by furthering his (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25. Resemiotization.Rick Iedema - 2001 - Semiotica 2001 (137).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  26.  32
    Research as Affect-Sphere: Towards Spherogenics.Rick Iedema & Katherine Carroll - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (1):67-72.
    This article outlines the main tenets of affect theory and links these to Sloterdijk’s spherology. Where affect foregrounds prepersonal energies and posthuman impulses, spherology provides a lens for considering how humans congregate in constantly reconfiguring socialities in their pursuit of legitimacy and immunity. The article then explores the relevance of “affective spheres” for contemporary social science research. The article’s main argument here is that research of contemporary organisational and professional practices must increasingly be spherogenic, or seeking to build “affective spheres.” (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27. The architecture of representation.Rick Grush - 1997 - Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):5-23.
    b>: In this article I outline, apply, and defend a theory of natural representation. The main consequences of this theory are: i) representational status is a matter of how physical entities are used, and specifically is not a matter of causation, nomic relations with the intentional object, or information; ii) there are genuine (brain-)internal representations; iii) such representations are really representations, and not just farcical pseudo-representations, such as attractors, principal components, state-space partitions, or what-have-you;and iv) the theory allows us to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
  28.  52
    How and Why to Teach Interdisciplinary Research Practice.Rick Szostak - 2007 - Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M17.
    This article addresses the interrelated questions of why it is important to teach students about the nature of interdisciplinarity and how this material might be best communicated to students. It is important to define for students what is meant by disciplines and interdisciplinarity. Having distinguished interdisciplinarity from the disciplinary approach, the advantages and disadvantages of each can be discussed. It is useful to discuss the history of both disciplines and interdisciplinarity. It is also useful to discuss the complex relationship between (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29.  5
    What School Should Be: The Design Elements for Educational Cultures.Rick Ackerly - 2023 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In entertaining stories of teachers, children, parents and principals Ackerly shows leadership in action and defines the elements of educational cultures, how culture is the delivery system for education, and how individuals can be leaders and create the culture of whatever group they are in.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  7
    Impaired Encoding: Calculating, Ordering, and the “Disability Percentages” Classification System.Gaby Admon-Rick - 2014 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 39 (1):105-129.
    Work injury compensation and pensions are often determined according to medical disability rating scales attributing a percentage to each impaired body part or function. Incorporated into central medical–administrative networks of committees and examinations, these produce disability as a calculable space. This article examines the specific case of the Israeli National Insurance regulations regarding work injuries of 1956 and analyzes the shifted order they set. Looking at this system in the specific historical context of transition from the British Mandate workmen’s compensation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  14
    Knowing Emotions: Truthfulness and Recognition in Affective Experience.Rick Anthony Furtak - 2018 - Oup Usa.
    In Knowing Emotions, Furtak argues that it is only through the emotions that we can perceive meaning in life, and only by feeling emotions that we are able to recognize the value or significance of anything whatsoever. Our affective responses and dispositions therefore play a critical role in human existence, and their felt quality is intimately related to the awareness they provide.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  32. Internal models and the construction of time: generalizing from state estimation to trajectory estimation to address temporal features of perception, including temporal illusions.Rick Grush - unknown
    The question of whether time is its own best representation is explored. Though there is theoretical debate between proponents of internal models and embedded cognition proponents (e.g. Brooks R 1991 Artificial Intelligence 47 139–59) concerning whether the world is its own best model, proponents of internal models are often content to let time be its own best representation. This happens via the time update of the model that simply allows the model’s state to evolve along with the state of the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  33.  4
    Revisiting the Winning of the West.Rick Gilliam - 2002 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 22 (2):147-157.
    In 1996, the Land and Water Fund of the Rockies (LAW Fund), a nonprofit environmental lawand policy center based in Boulder, Colorado, released How the West Can Win: A Blueprint for a Clean and Affordable Energy Future. The blueprint found that rapid growth in the West would lead to another round of fossil fuel–fired power plants and the associated environmental impacts unless policy makers changed course toward a more sustainable energy future. The study provided a set of strategies that lawmakers, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  7
    Complexity science at the schoolhouse gate?Rick Ginsberg - 1997 - Complexity 2 (4):9-13.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  42
    The Popularity of.Rick Lyman - 2002 - The Chesterton Review 28 (1/2):231-234.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  14
    The Popularity of "The Lord of the Rings" as a Film.Rick Lyman - 2002 - The Chesterton Review 28 (1-2):231-234.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Teacher Beliefs, Perceptions of Behavior Problems, and Intervention Preferences.Rick Jay Short & Paula M. Short - 1989 - Journal of Social Studies Research 13 (2):28-33.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  19
    Assessing Cross-sectoral and Cross-jurisdictional Coordination for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness.Rick Hogan, Cheryl H. Bullard, Daniel Stier, Matthew S. Penn, Teresa Wall, John Cleland, James H. Burch, Judith Monroe, Robert E. Ragland, Thurbert Baker & John Casciotti - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):36-52.
    A community's abilities to promote health and maximize its response to public health threats require fulfillment of one of the four elements of public health legal preparedness, the capacity to effectively coordinate law-based efforts across different governmental jurisdictions, as well as across multiple sectors and disciplines. Government jurisdictions can be viewed “vertically” in that response efforts may entail coordination in the application of laws across multiple levels, including local, state, tribal, and federal governments, and even with international organizations. Coordination of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  39.  29
    Assessing Cross-sectoral and Cross-jurisdictional Coordination for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness.Rick Hogan, Cheryl H. Bullard, Daniel Stier, Matthew S. Penn, Teresa Wall, John Cleland, James H. Burch, Judith Monroe, Robert E. Ragland, Thurbert Baker & John Casciotti - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (S1):36-41.
    A community's abilities to promote health and maximize its response to public health threats require fulfillment of one of the four elements of public health legal preparedness, the capacity to effectively coordinate law-based efforts across different governmental jurisdictions, as well as across multiple sectors and disciplines. Government jurisdictions can be viewed “vertically” in that response efforts may entail coordination in the application of laws across multiple levels, including local, state, tribal, and federal governments, and even with international organizations. Coordination of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  40.  21
    Assessing Cross-Sectoral and Cross-Jurisdictional Coordination for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness.Rick Hogan, Cheryl H. Bullard, Daniel Stier, Matthew S. Penn, Teresa Wall, Honorable John Cleland, James H. Burch, Judith Monroe, Robert E. Ragland, Honrable Thurbert Baker & John Casciotti - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):36-41.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41. Self, world and space: The meaning and mechanisms of ego- and allocentric spatial representation.Rick Grush - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (1):59-92.
    b>: The problem of how physical systems, such as brains, come to represent themselves as subjects in an objective world is addressed. I develop an account of the requirements for this ability that draws on and refines work in a philosophical tradition that runs from Kant through Peter Strawson to Gareth Evans. The basic idea is that the ability to represent oneself as a subject in a world whose existence is independent of oneself involves the ability to represent space, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  42.  28
    Chronic disease, prevention policy, and the future of public health and primary care.Rick Mayes & Blair Armistead - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):691-697.
    Globally, chronic disease and conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression and cancer are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Why, then, are public health efforts and programs aimed at preventing chronic disease so difficult to implement and maintain? Also, why is primary care—the key medical specialty for helping persons with chronic disease manage their illnesses—in decline? Public health suffers from its often being socially controversial, personally intrusive, irritating to many powerful corporate interests, and structurally designed to be largely (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  80
    The Cognitive Dynamics of Negated Sentence Verification.Rick Dale & Nicholas D. Duran - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (5):983-996.
    We explored the influence of negation on cognitive dynamics, measured using mouse‐movement trajectories, to test the classic notion that negation acts as an operator on linguistic processing. In three experiments, participants verified the truth or falsity of simple statements, and we tracked the computer‐mouse trajectories of their responses. Sentences expressing these facts sometimes contained a negation. Such negated statements could be true (e.g., “elephants are not small”) or false (e.g., “elephants are not large”). In the first experiment, as predicted by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  44. Skill Theory v2.0: Dispositions, Emulation, and Spatial Perception.Rick Grush - 2007 - Synthese 159 (3):389 - 416.
    An attempt is made to defend a general approach to the spatial content of perception, an approach according to which perception is imbued with spatial content in virtue of certain kinds of connections between perceiving organism's sensory input and its behavioral output. The most important aspect of the defense involves clearly distinguishing two kinds of perceptuo-behavioral skills—the formation of dispositions, and a capacity for emulation. The former, the formation of dispositions, is argued to by the central pivot of spatial content. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  45.  49
    The Dynamics of Reference and Shared Visual Attention.Rick Dale, Natasha Z. Kirkham & Daniel C. Richardson - 2011 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
  46. In defense of some "cartesian" assumption concerning the brain and its operation.Rick Grush - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):53-92.
    I argue against a growing radical trend in current theoretical cognitive science that moves from the premises of embedded cognition, embodied cognition, dynamical systems theory and/or situated robotics to conclusions either to the effect that the mind is not in the brain or that cognition does not require representation, or both. I unearth the considerations at the foundation of this view: Haugeland's bandwidth-component argument to the effect that the brain is not a component in cognitive activity, and arguments inspired by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  47.  38
    Free choice and distribution over disjunction.Rick Nouwen - 2018 - Semantics and Pragmatics 11:1-11.
  48. Time and experience.Rick Grush - 2007 - In Philosophie der Zeit: Neue analytische Ansätze. Frankfurt am Main: Klostermann. pp. 27-44.
    Nothing is more obvious than the fact that we are able to experience events in the world such a ball deflecting from the cross-bar of a goal. But what is the temporal relation between these two things, the event, and our experience of the event? One possibility is that the world progresses temporally through a sequence of instantaneous states – the striker’s foot in contact with the ball, then the ball between the striker and the goal, then the ball in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  49. How to, and how n ot to, bridge computational cognitive neuroscience and Husserlian phenomenology of time consciousness.Rick Grush - 2006 - Synthese 153 (3):417-450.
    A number of recent attempts to bridge Husserlian phenomenology of time consciousness and contemporary tools and results from cognitive science or computational neuroscience are described and critiqued. An alternate proposal is outlined that lacks the weaknesses of existing accounts.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  50. On the temporal character of temporal experience, its scale non-invariance, and its small scale structure.Rick Grush - 2016
    The nature of temporal experience is typically explained in one of a small number of ways, most are versions of either retentionalism or extensionalism. After describing these, I make a distinction between two kinds of temporal character that could structure temporal experience: A-ish contents are those that present events as structured in past/present/future terms, and B-ish contents are those that present events as structured in earlier-than/later-than/simultaneous-with relations. There are a few exceptions, but most of the literature ignores this distinction, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
1 — 50 / 788