Results for 'Risk Communication'

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  1.  84
    Risk Communication and Informed Consent in the Medical Tourism Industry: A Thematic Content Analysis of Canadian Broker Websites. [REVIEW]Kali Penney, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):17-.
    Background: Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing (...)
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  2.  11
    Moral and Instrumental Norms in Food Risk Communication.Peter G. Modin & Sven Ove Hansson - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):313 - 324.
    The major normative recommendations in the literature on food risk communication can be summarized in the form of seven practical principles for such communication: (1) Be honest and open. (2) Disclose incentives and conflicts of interest. (3) Take all available relevant knowledge into consideration. (4) When possible, quantify risks. (5) Describe and explain uncertainties. (6) Take all the public's concerns into account. (7) Take the rights of individuals and groups seriously. We show that each of these proposed (...)
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  3.  27
    Making Sense of Risk. Donor Risk Communication in Families Considering Living Liverdonation to a Child.Mare Knibbe & Marian Verkerk - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):149-156.
    This paper contributes to the growing line of thought in bioethics that respect for autonomy should not be equated to the facilitation of individualistic self determination through standard requirements of informed consent in all healthcare contexts. The paper describes how in the context of donation for living related liver transplantation (LRLT) meaningful, responsible decision making is often embedded within family processes and its negotiation. We suggest that good donor risk communication in families promote “conscientious autonomy” and “reflective trust”. (...)
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  4.  31
    Risk Communication in Assisted Reproduction in Latvia: From Private Experience to Ethical Issues.Signe Mezinska & Ilze Mileiko - 2013 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 6 (2):79-96.
    The aim of this paper is to analyze the process of risk communication in the context of assisted reproduction in Latvia. The paper is based on a qualitative methodology and two types of data: media analysis and 30 semi-structured interviews (11 patients, 4 egg donors, 15 experts). The study explores a broad definition of risk communication and explores three types of risks: health, psychosocial, and moral. We ask (1), who is involved in risk communication, (...)
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  5.  96
    Argumentation and Risk Communication About Genetic Testing: Challenges for Healthcare Consumers and Implications for Computer Systems.Nancy Green - 2012 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 1 (1):113-129.
    As genetic testing for the presence of potentially health-affecting mutations becomes available for more genetic conditions, many people will soon be faced with the decision of whether or not to have a genetic test. Making an informed decision requires an understanding and evaluation of the arguments for and against having the test. As a case in point, this paper considers argumentation involving the decision of whether to have a BRCA gene test, one of the first commercially available genetic tests. First, (...)
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  6.  13
    Probleme der Transparenten Kommunikation Medizinischer Risiken Am Beispiel „Mammographie-Screening“ – Eine Ethische PerspektiveProblems of Transparent Medical Risk Communication Using the Example of Mammography Screening—an Ethical Perspective.Christof Breitsameter - 2011 - Ethik in der Medizin 23 (3):191-200.
    Die spezifischen Anforderungen riskanter Entscheidungslagen stellen die Medizinethik zunehmend vor die Herausforderung, normative Modelle der Risikokommunikation zu etablieren. Dabei geht es freilich nicht nur darum, Informationen über die Wahrscheinlichkeiten, mit denen bestimmte Ereignisse eintreten, bereitzustellen. Zur medizinischen Aufklärung gehört auch, dass Risiken verständlich kommuniziert werden. Andernfalls würde ein Patient zwar über Informationen verfügen, wäre aber nicht in der Lage, sie richtig zu interpretieren und zu bewerten. Der Beitrag stellt am Beispiel von Mammographie-Screenings Probleme der transparenten Kommunikation medizinischer Risiken dar. Diese (...)
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  7.  34
    Resource Effects of Training General Practitioners in Risk Communication Skills and Shared Decision Making Competences.David Cohen, M. F. Longo, Kerenza Hood, Adrian Edwards & Glyn Elwyn - 2004 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):439-445.
  8.  22
    Part III Mediating Technologies of Risk.Rumour Risk - 2000 - In Barbara Adam, Ulrich Beck & Joost van Loon (eds.), The Risk Society and Beyond: Critical Issues for Social Theory. Sage Publications. pp. 136.
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  9. Pharmaceutical Risk Communication: Sources of Uncertainty and Legal Tools of Uncertainty Management.Barbara Osimani - 2010 - Health Risk and Society 12 (5):453-69.
    Risk communication has been generally categorized as a warning act, which is performed in order to prevent or minimize risk. On the other side, risk analysis has also underscored the role played by information in reducing uncertainty about risk. In both approaches the safety aspects related to the protection of the right to health are on focus. However, it seems that there are cases where a risk cannot possibly be avoided or uncertainty reduced, this (...)
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  10.  26
    Risk Communication, Value Judgments, and the Public-Policy Maker Relationship in a Climate of Public Sensitivity Toward Animals: Revisiting Britain's Foot and Mouth Crisis. [REVIEW]Raymond Anthony - 2004 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (4-5):363-383.
    This paper offers some suggestions on, and encouragement for, how to be better at risk communication in times of agricultural crisis. During the foot and mouth epizootic, the British public, having no precedent to deal with such a rapid and widespread epizootic, no existing rules or conventions, and no social or political consensus, was forced to confront the facts of a perceived "economic disease. Foot and mouth appeared as an economic disease because the major push to eradicate it (...)
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  11.  15
    BSE in the UK: Why the Risk Communication Strategy Failed. [REVIEW]Karsten Klint Jensen - 2004 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (4-5):405-423.
    The 2000 BSE Inquiry report points out that the most serious failure of the UK Government was one of risk communication. This paper argues that the government''s failure to communicate the risks BSE posed to humans to a large degree can be traced back to a lack of transparency in the first risk assessment by the Southwood Working Party. This lack of transparency ensured that the working party''s risk characterization and recommendations were ambiguous and thus hard (...)
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  12.  11
    Risk Communication for Nanobiotechnology: To Whom, About What, and Why?Susanna Hornig Priest - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):759-769.
    Regulatory oversight and public communication are intimately intertwined. Oversight failures quickly galvanize media and public attention. In addition, regulations sometimes require that risks and uncertainties be included in communication efforts aimed at non-experts outside of the regulatory and policy communities — whether in obtaining informed consent for novel medical treatments; by including risk information on drug labels, in drug advertisements, or on chemicals used in the workplace; in providing nutritional information on food packages; or by opening environmental (...)
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  13.  13
    Communicating Food Safety: Ethical Issues in Risk Communication[REVIEW]Clifford W. Scherer & Napoleon K. Juanillo - 1992 - Agriculture and Human Values 9 (2):17-26.
    This paper discusses two paradigms of risk communication that guide strategies for communicating food safety issues. Built on the principles of social utility and paternalism, the first paradigm heavily relies on science and technical experts to determine food safety regulations and policies. Risk communication, in this context, is a unidirectional process by which experts from the industry or government regulatory agencies inform or alert potentially affected publics about the hazards they face and the protective actions they (...)
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  14. Understanding Risk in Forest Ecosystem Services: Implications for Effective Risk Management, Communication and Planning.Kristina Blennow, Johannes Persson, Annika Wallin, Niklas Vareman & Erik Persson - 2014 - Forestry 87:219-228.
    Uncertainty, insufficient information or information of poor quality, limited cognitive capacity and time, along with value conflicts and ethical considerations, are all aspects thatmake risk managementand riskcommunication difficult. This paper provides a review of different risk concepts and describes how these influence risk management, communication and planning in relation to forest ecosystem services. Based on the review and results of empirical studies, we suggest that personal assessment of risk is decisive in the management of forest (...)
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  15.  70
    Inductive Risk and the Contexts of Communication.Stephen John - 2015 - Synthese 192 (1):79-96.
    In recent years, the argument from inductive risk against value free science has enjoyed a revival. This paper investigates and clarifies this argument through means of a case-study: neonicitinoid research. Sect. 1 argues that the argument from inductive risk is best conceptualised as a claim about scientists’ communicative obligations. Sect. 2 then shows why this argument is inapplicable to “public communication”. Sect. 3 outlines non-epistemic reasons why non-epistemic values should not play a role in public communicative contexts. (...)
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  16.  13
    Doctor, What Does My Positive Test Mean? From Bayesian Textbook Tasks to Personalized Risk Communication.Gorka Navarrete, Rut Correia, Miroslav Sirota, Marie Juanchich & David Huepe - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  17.  10
    Risk Communication for Nanobiotechnology: To Whom, About What, and Why?Susanna Hornig Priest - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):759-769.
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  18.  47
    Autism Spectrum Disorders, Risk Communication, and the Problem of Inadvertent Harm.John Rossi, Craig Newschaffer & Michael Yudell - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (2):105-138.
    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are an issue of growing public health significance. This set of neurodevelopmental disorders, which includes autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), is characterized by abnormalities in one or more of the following domains: language use, reciprocal social interactions, and/or a pattern of restricted interests or stereotyped behaviors. Prevalence estimates for ASDs have been increasing over the past few decades, with estimates at ~5/10,000 in the 1960s, and current estimates as high (...)
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  19.  11
    Monster Wildfires and Metaphor in Risk Communication.Matlock Teenie, Coe Chelsea & Westerling A. Leroy - 2017 - Metaphor and Symbol 32 (4):250-261.
    This work examines the use and understanding of metaphor in wildfire discourse. We focus on the framing of wildfires as monsters, seen in statements such as “Monster wildfire rages in Colorado” and “Two monster wildfires in Northern California are slowly being tamed,” which reflect a “wildfire is monster” metaphor. Study 1 analyzes how and when this phrase is used in TV news reports of wildfires, and Study 2A and Study 2B investigate how it influences reasoning about risks associated with wildfire. (...)
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  20.  9
    Risk Communication in EPA's Controlled Inhalation Exposure Studies and in Support.David Resnik - 2017 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (1):117-129.
    On March 28, 2017, the national Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine released a much-anticipated report on the Environmental Protection Agency's controlled human inhalation exposure studies. To understand the genesis of the document, a quick review of recent events is in order.Prior to 2006, the EPA adopted the Common Rule for intramural or extramural research funded by the agency.1 Although the EPA did not have a formal policy that applied to research sponsored by private companies, it applied scientific and ethical (...)
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  21.  1
    Probleme der Transparenten Kommunikation Medizinischer Risiken Am Beispiel „Mammographie-Screening“ – Eine Ethische PerspektiveProblems of Transparent Medical Risk Communication Using the Example of Mammography Screening—an Ethical Perspective.Christof Breitsameter - 2011 - Ethik in der Medizin 23 (3):191-200.
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  22.  10
    Review Article: Risk Communication in the Patient‐Health Professional Relationship.Stephen Buetow, Judith Cantrill & Bonnie Sibbald - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (3):261-268.
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  23. Risk, Communication and Health.H. Joffe - 2005 - Hermes 14:121-131.
     
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  24.  6
    Risk Communication in the Patient-Health Professional Relationship.Stephen Buetow, Judith Cantrill & Bonnie Sibbald - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (3):261-268.
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  25.  15
    Japanese Risk Society: Trying to Create Complete Security and Safety Using Information and Communication Technology.Kiyoshi Murata & Yohko Orito - 2010 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (3):38-49.
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  26.  53
    The Ethics of Truth-Telling and the Problem of Risk.Paul B. Thompson - 1999 - Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):489-510.
    Risk communication poses a challenge to ordinary norms of truth-telling because it can easily mislead. Analyzing this challenge in terms of a systematic divergence between expertise and public attitudes fails to recognize how two specific features of the concept of risk play a role in managing daily affairs. First, evaluating risk always incorporates an estimate of the reliability of information. Since risk communication is an effort at providing information, audiences will naturally and appropriately incorporate (...)
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  27.  65
    Public Communication, Risk Perception, and the Viability of Preventive Vaccination Against Communica.Thomas May - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (4):407-421.
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  28.  64
    Communication of Ambiguous Risk Information.W. Kip Viscusi, Wesley A. Magat & Joel Huber - 1991 - Theory and Decision 31 (2-3):159-173.
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  29.  19
    The Technical and Democratic Approaches to Risk Situations: Their Appeal, Limitations, and Rhetorical Alternative. [REVIEW]Katherine E. Rowan - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (4):391-409.
    Because of the increasing number of “man-made” hazards in contemporary life, as well as the growing number of disastrous industrial accidents, interest in risk communication has burgeoned. Consequently, scholars and practitioners need to understand two of the more common responses to risk situations, the technical and democratic. This paper describes these two responses, identifies types of individuals likely to prefer each, and explains why, historically and sociologically, they are so intuitively compelling for many people. Arguing that both (...)
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  30.  19
    Transparent Communication in High Risk Infections: A Bioethical Perspective.Mrinmoy Chakrabarty, Vijay Thawani & Pinki Devi - 2012 - Asian Bioethics Review 4 (2):143-149.
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  31.  26
    A Survey of Physician Training Programs in Risk Management and Communication Skills for Malpractice Prevention.Frank V. Lefevre, Teresa M. Waters & Peter P. Budetti - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):258-266.
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  32.  8
    A Survey of Physician Training Programs in Risk Management and Communication Skills for Malpractice Prevention.Frank V. Lefevre, Teresa M. Waters & Peter P. Budetti - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):258-266.
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  33.  7
    Public Communication, Risk Perception, and the Viability of Preventive Vaccination Against Communicable Diseases.M. A. Y. Thomas - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (4):407–421.
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  34.  36
    Labeling Products of Biotechnology: Towards Communication and Consent.Debra Jackson - 2000 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (3):319-330.
    Both consumers and producers of biotechnology products have insisted that communication between the two be improved. The former demand more democratic participation in the risk assessment process of biotechnology products. The latter seek to correct misinformation regarding alleged risks from these products. One way to resolve these concerns, I argue, is through the use of biotechnology labels. Such labeling fosters consumer autonomy and moves toward more participatory decisionmaking, in addition to ensuring that informed consent from consumers is maintained. (...)
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  35.  74
    Double or Nothing?! Small Groups Making Decisions Under Risk in “Quiz Taxi”.Klemens Keldenich & Marcus Klemm - 2014 - Theory and Decision 77 (2):243-274.
    This paper investigates the behavior of contestants in the game show “Quiz Taxi” when faced with the decision whether to bet the winnings they have acquired on a final “double or nothing” question. The decision in this natural experiment is made by groups of two or three persons. This setup enables the decision-making process to be studied with regard to group and communication characteristics. The contestants show fairly risk averse behavior. There is also a significant heterogeneity in attitude (...)
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  36.  14
    From Risk Factors to Health Resources in Medical Practice.Hanne Hollnagel - 2000 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (3):255-262.
    The healing and preventive powers of people's health resources and self-assessed knowledge have so far been grossly underestimated in medicine. In this article, we call attention to ethical and epistemological dilemmas related to knowledge, values, communication, and autonomy embedded in the prevailing risk-oriented epidemiology, and suggest a patient-centred salutogenetic approach to promote a better balance between resources and risks in medicine. Identification and intervention upon risk factors can provide hypotheses about origins of disease and predict and sometimes (...)
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  37.  70
    Moral Risk and Communicating Consent.Renée Jorgensen Bolinger - 2019 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 47 (2):179-207.
    In addition to protecting agents’ autonomy, consent plays a crucial social role: it enables agents to secure partners in valuable interactions that would be prohibitively morally risk otherwise. To do this, consent must be observable: agents must be able to track the facts about whether they have received a consent-based permission. I argue that this morally justifies a consent-practice on which communicating that one consents is sufficient for consent, but also generates robust constraints on what sorts of behaviors can (...)
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  38. Public Health Communication Interventions Values and Ethical Dilemmas.Nurit Guttman - 2000
     
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  39.  41
    Involving Patients in Decision Making and Communicating Risk: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Doctors' Attitudes and Confidence During a Randomized Trial.Adrian Edwards & Glyn Elwyn - 2004 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):431-437.
  40.  49
    Fishers Weigh In: Benefits and Risks of Eating Great Lakes Fish From the Consumer’s Perspective. [REVIEW]Jennifer Dawson, Judy Sheeshka, Donald C. Cole, David Kraft & Amy Waugh - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):349-364.
    Three decades of concern over consumption of potentially contaminated Great Lakes fish has led government agencies and public health proponents to implement risk assessment and management programs as a means of protecting the health of fishers and their families. While well-meaning in their intent, these programs––and much of the research conducted to support and evaluate them––were not designed to accommodate the understandings and concerns of the fish consumer. Results from a qualitative component of a multi-disciplinary, multi-year research project on (...)
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  41.  24
    Introduction: The Ethical Challenges of Nanotechnologies. [REVIEW]Alan Petersen - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):9-12.
    Nanotechnologies are expected to have a substantial impact on our lives in the future. However, the nanotechnology field is characterised by many uncertainties and debates surrounding the characterisation of technologies, the nature of the applications, the potential benefits and the likely risks. Given the rapid development of nanotechnologies, it is timely to consider what, if any, novel ethical challenges are posed by developments and how best to address these given the attendant uncertainties. The three articles which comprise this symposium consider (...)
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  42.  26
    Strategic Reputation Risk Management.Judy Larkin - 2003 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Reputation is a commercially valuable asset. This book focuses upon how enhanced reputation can contribute to commercial asset management through increased share price premium and competitive performance, while reputation loss can significantly erode the ability of the business to successfully retain market share, maximize shareholder value, raise finance, manage debt, and remain independent. It provides practical models and checklists designed to plan reputation management and risk communication strategies.
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  43.  37
    The Use of 'No Evidence' Statements in Public Health.Louise Cummings - 2015 - Informal Logic 35 (4):32-64.
    Public health communication makes extensive use of a linguistic formulation that will be called the “no evidence” statement. This is a written or spoken statement of the form “There is no evidence that P” where P stands for a proposition that typically describes a human health risk. Danger lurks in these expressions for the hearer or reader who is not logically perspicacious, as arguments that use them are only warranted under certain conditions. The extent to which members of (...)
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  44.  97
    Food Safety and Ethics: The Interplay Between Science and Values. [REVIEW]Karsten Klint Jensen & Peter Sandøe - 2002 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (3):245-253.
    The general public in Europe seems tohave lost its confidence in food safety. Theremedy for this, as proposed by the Commissionof the EU, is a scientific rearmament. Thequestion, however, is whether more science willbe able to overturn the public distrust.Present experience seems to suggest thecontrary, because there is widespread distrustin the science-based governmental controlsystems. The answer to this problem is thecreation of an independent scientificFood Authority. However, we argue thatindependent scientific advice alone is unlikelyto re-establish public confidence. It is muchmore (...)
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  45.  29
    “Conflict Over Risks in Food Production: A Challenge for Democracy”. [REVIEW]Karsten Klint Jensen - 2006 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (3):269-283.
    When it comes to conflict over risk management priorities in food production, a number of observers, including myself, have called for some sort of public deliberation as a means of resolving the moral disagreements underlying such conflicts. This paper asks how, precisely, such deliberation might be facilitated. It is shown that representative democracy and the liberal regulation that most Western democracies adhere to place important constraints on public deliberation. The challenge is to find forums for public deliberation that can (...)
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  46.  13
    Ethical, Legal, and Clinical Considerations When Disclosing a High‐Risk Syndrome for Psychosis.Vijay A. Mittal, Derek J. Dean, Jyoti Mittal & Elyn R. Saks - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (8):543-556.
    There are complex considerations when planning to disclose an attenuated psychosis syndrome diagnosis. In this review, we evaluate ethical, legal, and clinical perspectives as well as caveats related to full, non- and partial disclosure strategies, discuss societal implications, and provide clinical suggestions. Each of the disclosure strategies is associated with benefits as well as costs/considerations. Full disclosure promotes autonomy, allows for the clearest psychoeducation about additional risk factors, helps to clarify and/or correct previous diagnoses/treatments, facilitates early intervention and bolsters (...)
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  47.  41
    Avoiding the Trust Deficit: Public Engagement, Values, the Precautionary Principle and the Future of Nanotechnology. [REVIEW]Margaret Stebbing - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):37-48.
    Debates about the regulatory requirements surrounding the introduction of nanotechnology products have, at least in Australia, remained largely within disciplinary boundaries and industry and academic circles. This paper argues for a more interdisciplinary and inclusive upstream debate about the introduction of ethical, regulatory and legal frameworks that may avoid the loss of public trust that has characterised the introduction of many new technologies in the past. Insights from risk-perception theory and research are used to introduce the notion of (...) as narrative as a framework for action. This paper suggests three main strategies for moving forward; drawing insights from the “trust gap” experiences of other new technologies; the application of the active form of the precautionary principle; and, the creation of nano-futures that meet both community and industry values through effective public engagement. (shrink)
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  48.  15
    Humanized Birth in High Risk Pregnancy: Barriers and Facilitating Factors. [REVIEW]Roxana Behruzi, Marie Hatem, Lise Goulet, William Fraser, Nicole Leduc & Chizuru Misago - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):49-58.
    The medical model of childbearing assumes that a pregnancy always has the potential to turn into a risky procedure. In order to advocate humanized birth in high risk pregnancy, an important step involves the enlightenment of the professional’s preconceptions on humanized birth in such a situation. The goal of this paper is to identify the professionals’ perception of the potential obstacles and facilitating factors for the implementation of humanized care in high risk pregnancies. Twenty-one midwives, obstetricians, and health (...)
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  49.  9
    Statistical Reporting with Philip's Sextuple and Extended Sextuple: A Simple Method for Easy Communication of Findings.Philip Tromovitch - 2012 - Journal of Research Practice 8 (1):Article - P2.
    The advance of science and human knowledge is impeded by misunderstandings of various statistics, insufficient reporting of findings, and the use of numerous standardized and non-standardized presentations of essentially identical information. Communication with journalists and the public is hindered by the failure to present statistics that are easy for non-scientists to interpret as well as by use of the word significant, which in scientific English does not carry the meaning of "important" or "large." This article promotes a new standard (...)
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  50.  34
    Potential Conflicts Between Normatively-Responsible Advocacy and Successful Social Influence: Evidence From Persuasion Effects Research. [REVIEW]Daniel J. O’Keefe - 2007 - Argumentation 21 (2):151-163.
    This article approaches the relationship of normative argumentation studies and descriptive persuasion effects research by pointing to several empirical findings that raise questions or puzzles about normatively-proper argumentative conduct. These findings indicate some complications in the analysis of normatively desirable argumentative conduct – including some ways in which practical persuasive success may not be entirely compatible with normatively-desirable advocacy practices.
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