Search results for 'Rita Nakashima Brock' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  23
    Rita Nakashima Brock (1993). God's Power. Process Studies 22 (1):58-60.
  2.  22
    Rita Brock (1982). Feminism and Process Thought. Process Studies 12 (1):46-50.
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  3.  8
    Joanne Lynn, Joan Teno, Rebecca Dresser, Dan Brock, H. Lindemann Nelson, J. Lindemann Nelson, Rita Kielstein, Yoshinosuke Fukuchi, Dan Lu & Haruka Itakura (1999). Dementia and Advance-Care Planning: Perspectives From Three Countries on Ethics and Epidemiology. Journal of Clinical Ethics 10 (4):271.
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  4. Steen Brock (2016). Steen Brock A Conception of Modern Life as “the Awakening of the Human Spirit, Revisited”: Wittgenstein’s Early Remarks on Frazer as a Philosophy of Culture. In Aidan Seery, Josef G. F. Rothhaupt & Lars Albinus (eds.), Wittgenstein’s Remarks on Frazer: The Text and the Matter. De Gruyter. pp. 175-204.
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  5.  62
    Gillian Brock (2009). Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account. Oxford University Press.
    Gillian Brock develops a model of global justice that takes seriously the moral equality of all human beings notwithstanding their legitimate diverse identifications and affiliations. She addresses concerns about implementing global justice, showing how we can move from theory to feasible public policy that makes progress toward global justice.
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  6.  63
    Dan W. Brock (1993). Life and Death: Philosophical Essays in Biomedical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    How should modern medicine's dramatic new powers to sustain life be employed? How should limited resources be used to extend and improve the quality of life? In this collection, Dan Brock, a distinguished philosopher and bioethicist and co-author of Deciding for Others (Cambridge, 1989), explores the moral issues raised by new ideals of shared decision making between physicians and patients. The book develops an ethical framework for decisions about life-sustaining treatment and euthanasia, and examines how these life and death (...)
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  7.  36
    S. R. Benatar & Gillian Brock (eds.) (2011). Global Health and Global Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction; Part I. Global Health, Definitions and Descriptions: 1. What is global health? Solly Benatar and Ross Upshur; 2. The state of global health in a radically unequal world: patterns and prospects Ron Labonte and Ted Schrecker; 3. Addressing the societal determinants of health: the key global health ethics imperative of our times Anne-Emmanuelle Birn; 4. Gender and global health: inequality and differences Lesley Doyal and Sarah Payne; 5. Heath systems and health Martin McKee; Part (...)
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  8. Gillian Brock & Michael Blake (2015). Debating Brain Drain: May Governments Restrict Emigration? Oup Usa.
    Many of the most skilled and educated citizens of developing countries choose to emigrate. How may those societies respond to these facts? May they ever legitimately prevent the emigration of their citizens? Gillian Brock and Michael Blake debate these questions, and offer distinct arguments about the morality of emigration.
     
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  9.  99
    Soran Reader & Gillian Brock (2004). Needs, Moral Demands and Moral Theory. Utilitas 16 (3):251-266.
    In this article we argue that the concept of need is as vital for moral theory as it is for moral life. In II we analyse need and its normativity in public and private moral practice. In III we describe simple cases which exemplify the moral demandingness of needs, and argue that the significance of simple cases for moral theory is obscured by the emphasis in moral philosophy on unusual cases. In IV we argue that moral theories are inadequate if (...)
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  10.  78
    Gillian Brock (2009). Concerns About Global Justice : A Response to Critics. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):269 – 280.
    A review essay of Gillian Brock Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account (Oxford University Press, 2009).
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  11.  2
    Werner Brock (1935). An Introduction to Contemporary German Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Originally published in 1935, this book charts the development of philosophy in Germany from German Humanism to Heidegger and his contemporaries. Brock also devotes an entire chapter to the lasting impact of Nietzsche and Kierkegaard on German philosophy. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of German philosophy and its presentation before WWII.
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  12.  35
    F. G. Miller, R. D. Truog & D. W. Brock (2010). The Dead Donor Rule: Can It Withstand Critical Scrutiny? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (3):299-312.
    Transplantation of vital organs has been premised ethically and legally on "the dead donor rule" (DDR)—the requirement that donors are determined to be dead before these organs are procured. Nevertheless, scholars have argued cogently that donors of vital organs, including those diagnosed as "brain dead" and those declared dead according to cardiopulmonary criteria, are not in fact dead at the time that vital organs are being procured. In this article, we challenge the normative rationale for the DDR by rejecting the (...)
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  13. Dan W. Brock (2008). Conscientious Refusal by Physicians and Pharmacists: Who is Obligated to Do What, and Why? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):187-200.
    Some medical services have long generated deep moral controversy within the medical profession as well as in broader society and have led to conscientious refusals by some physicians to provide those services to their patients. More recently, pharmacists in a number of states have refused on grounds of conscience to fill legal prescriptions for their customers. This paper assesses these controversies. First, I offer a brief account of the basis and limits of the claim to be free to act on (...)
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  14. Siam Bhayro & Sebastian Brock (2013). The Syriac Galen Palimpsest and the Role of Syriac in the Transmission of Greek Medicine in the Orient. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 89 (1):25-43.
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  15. Dan W. Brock (1995). The Non-Identity Problem and Genetic Harms – the Case of Wrongful Handicaps. Bioethics 9 (3):269–275.
    The Human Genome Project will produce information permitting increasing opportunities to prevent genetically transmitted harms, most of which will be compatible with a life worth living, through avoiding conception or terminating a pregnancy. Failure to prevent these harms when it is possible for parents to do so without substantial burdens or costs to themselves or others are what J call “wrongful handicaps”. Derek Parfit has developed a systematic difficulty for any such cases being wrongs — when the harm could be (...)
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  16. Dan W. Brock (1992). Voluntary Active Euthanasia. Hastings Center Report 22 (2):10-22.
    This article references the following linked citations. If you are trying to access articles from an off-campus location, you may be required to first logon via your library web site to access JSTOR. Please visit your library's website or contact a librarian to learn about options for remote access to JSTOR.
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  17.  10
    David A. Ralston, Carolyn P. Egri, Olivier Furrer, Min-Hsun Kuo, Yongjuan Li, Florian Wangenheim, Marina Dabic, Irina Naoumova, Katsuhiko Shimizu, María Teresa Garza Carranza, Ping Ping Fu, Vojko V. Potocan, Andre Pekerti, Tomasz Lenartowicz, Narasimhan Srinivasan, Tania Casado, Ana Maria Rossi, Erna Szabo, Arif Butt, Ian Palmer, Prem Ramburuth, David M. Brock, Jane Terpstra-Tong, Ilya Grison, Emmanuelle Reynaud, Malika Richards, Philip Hallinger, Francisco B. Castro, Jaime Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Laurie Milton, Mahfooz Ansari, Arunas Starkus, Audra Mockaitis, Tevfik Dalgic, Fidel León-Darder, Hung Vu Thanh, Yong-lin Moon, Mario Molteni, Yongqing Fang, Jose Pla-Barber, Ruth Alas, Isabelle Maignan, Jorge C. Jesuino, Chay-Hoon Lee, Joel D. Nicholson, Ho-Beng Chia, Wade Danis, Ajantha S. Dharmasiri & Mark Weber (forthcoming). Societal-Level Versus Individual-Level Predictions of Ethical Behavior: A 48-Society Study of Collectivism and Individualism. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  18.  6
    Riikka Sievänen, Hannu Rita & Bert Scholtens (2013). The Drivers of Responsible Investment: The Case of European Pension Funds. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):137-151.
    We investigate what drives responsible investment of European pension funds. Pension funds are institutional investors who assure the income of part of the population for a long period of time. Increasingly, stakeholders hold pension funds accountable for the non-financial consequences of their investments and many funds have engaged in responsible investing. However, it appears that there is a wide difference between pension funds in this respect. We investigate what determines pension funds’ responsible investments on the basis of a survey of (...)
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  19. Stuart Brock (2002). Fictionalism About Fictional Characters. Noûs 36 (1):1–21.
    Despite protestations to the contrary, philosophers have always been renowned for espousing theories that do violence to common-sense opinion. In the last twenty years or so there has been a growing number of philosophers keen to follow in this tradition. According to these philosophers, if a story of pure fic-tion tells us that an individual exists, then there really is such an individual. According to these realists about fictional characters, ‘Scarlett O’Hara,’ ‘Char-lie Brown,’ ‘Batman,’ ‘Superman,’ ‘Tweedledum’ and ‘Tweedledee’ are not (...)
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  20. Dan W. Brock (1987). Truth or Consequences: The Role of Philosophers in Policy-Making. Ethics 97 (4):786-791.
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  21. D. Brock, E. J. Emanuel, C. Grady, R. Lie, F. Miller & D. Wendler (2008). Philosophical Justifications of Informed Consent in Research. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  22. Gillian Brock (2008). Taxation and Global Justice: Closing the Gap Between Theory and Practice. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):161–184.
    I examine how reforming our international tax regime could be an important vehicle by which we can begin to realize global justice. For instance, eliminating tax havens, tax evasion, and transfer pricing schemes are all important to ensure accountability and to support democracies. I argue that the proposals concerning taxation reform are likely to be more effective in tackling global poverty than Thomas Pogge's global resources dividend because they target some of the central issues more effectively. I also discuss many (...)
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  23.  91
    Stuart Brock (1993). Modal Fictionalism: A Response to Rosen. Mind 102 (405):147-150.
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  24.  51
    Dan W. Brock (2010). Creating Embryos for Use in Stem Cell Research. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (2):229-237.
    In this paper I will address whether the restriction on the creation of human embryos solely for the purpose of research in which they will be used and destroyed in the creation of human stem cell lines is ethically justified. Of course, a cynical but perhaps accurate reading of the new Obama policy is that leaving this restriction in place was done for political, not ethical, reasons, in light of the apparent public opposition to creating embryos for use in this (...)
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  25.  51
    Gillian Brock (2013). Contemporary Cosmopolitanism: Some Current Issues. Philosophy Compass 8 (8):689-698.
    In this article, we survey some current debates among cosmopolitans and their critics. We begin by surveying some distinctions typically drawn among kinds of cosmopolitanisms, before canvassing some of the diverse varieties of cosmopolitan justice, exploring positions on the content of cosmopolitan duties of justice, and a prominent debate between cosmopolitans and defenders of statist accounts of global justice. We then explore some common concerns about cosmopolitanism – such as whether cosmopolitan commitments are necessarily in tension with other affiliations people (...)
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  26. Gillian Brock (1998). Necessary Goods: Our Responsibilities to Meet Others Needs. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do any needs defensibly make claims on anyone? If so, which needs and whose needs can defensibly do this? What are the grounds for our responsibilities to meet others' needs, when we have such responsibilities? The distinguished contributors to this volume consider these questions as they evaluate the moral force of needs. They approach questions of obligation and moral importance from a variety of different theoretical perspectives, including contractarian, Kantian, Aristotelian, rights-based, egalitarian, liberal, and libertarian perspectives.
     
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  27.  45
    Stuart Brock (2013). The Phenomenological Objection to Fictionalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):574-592.
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  28.  35
    D. W. Brock (2006). Is a Consensus Possible on Stem Cell Research? Moral and Political Obstacles. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (1):36-42.
    Neither of the two central moral and political obstacles to human embryonic stem cell research survives critical scrutinyThis paper argues that neither of the two central moral and political obstacles to human embryonic stem cell research survives critical scrutiny: first, that derivation of HESCs requires the destruction of human embryos which are full human persons or are at least deserving of respect incompatible with their destruction; second, that creation of HESCs using somatic cell nuclear transfer or cloning is immoral. First, (...)
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  29. Stuart Brock (2010). The Creationist Fiction: The Case Against Creationism About Fictional Characters. Philosophical Review 119 (3):337-364.
    This essay explains why creationism about fictional characters is an abject failure. Creationism about fictional characters is the view that fictional objects are created by the authors of the novels in which they first appear. This essay shows that, when the details of creationism are filled in, the hypothesis becomes far more puzzling than the linguistic data it is used to explain. No matter how the creationist identifies where, when and how fictional objects are created, the proposal conflicts with other (...)
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  30.  28
    David A. Ralston, Carolyn P. Egri, Emmanuelle Reynaud, Narasimhan Srinivasan, Olivier Furrer, David Brock, Ruth Alas, Florian Wangenheim, Fidel León Darder, Christine Kuo, Vojko Potocan, Audra I. Mockaitis, Erna Szabo, Jaime Ruiz Gutiérrez, Andre Pekerti, Arif Butt, Ian Palmer, Irina Naoumova, Tomasz Lenartowicz, Arunas Starkus, Vu Thanh Hung, Tevfik Dalgic, Mario Molteni, María Teresa Garza Carranza, Isabelle Maignan, Francisco B. Castro, Yong-Lin Moon, Jane Terpstra-Tong, Marina Dabic, Yongjuan Li, Wade Danis, Maria Kangasniemi, Mahfooz Ansari, Liesl Riddle, Laurie Milton, Philip Hallinger, Detelin Elenkov, Ilya Girson, Modesta Gelbuda, Prem Ramburuth, Tania Casado, Ana Maria Rossi, Malika Richards, Cheryl Deusen, Ping-Ping Fu, Paulina Man Kei Wan, Moureen Tang, Chay-Hoon Lee, Ho-Beng Chia, Yongquin Fan & Alan Wallace (2011). A Twenty-First Century Assessment of Values Across the Global Workforce. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):1-31.
    This article provides current Schwartz Values Survey (SVS) data from samples of business managers and professionals across 50 societies that are culturally and socioeconomically diverse. We report the society scores for SVS values dimensions for both individual- and societal-level analyses. At the individual-level, we report on the ten circumplex values sub-dimensions and two sets of values dimensions (collectivism and individualism; openness to change, conservation, self-enhancement, and self-transcendence). At the societal-level, we report on the values dimensions of embeddedness, hierarchy, mastery, affective (...)
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  31.  95
    Stuart Brock (2004). The Ubiquitous Problem of Empty Names. Journal of Philosophy 101 (6):277 - 298.
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  32.  91
    Franklin G. Miller, Robert D. Truog & Dan W. Brock (2010). Moral Fictions and Medical Ethics. Bioethics 24 (9):453-460.
    Conventional medical ethics and the law draw a bright line distinguishing the permitted practice of withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from the forbidden practice of active euthanasia by means of a lethal injection. When clinicians justifiably withdraw life-sustaining treatment, they allow patients to die but do not cause, intend, or have moral responsibility for, the patient's death. In contrast, physicians unjustifiably kill patients whenever they intentionally administer a lethal dose of medication. We argue that the differential moral assessment of these two practices (...)
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  33.  23
    Dan W. Brock (2001). Some Questions About the Moral Responsibilities of Drug Companies in Developing Countries. Developing World Bioethics 1 (1):33-37.
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  34.  67
    A. Franklin, M. Anderson, D. Brock, S. Coleman, J. Downing, A. Gruvander, J. Lilly, J. Neal, D. Peterson, M. Price, R. Rice, L. Smith, S. Speirer & D. Toering (1989). Can a Theory-Laden Observation Test the Theory? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (2):229-231.
  35.  81
    Gillian Brock (2005). Egalitarianism, Ideals, and Cosmopolitan Justice. Philosophical Forum 36 (1):1–30.
    Cosmopolitans believe that all human beings have equal moral worth and that our responsibilities to others do not stop at borders. Various cosmopolitans offer different interpretations of how we should understand what is entailed by that equal moral worth and what responsibilities we have to each other in taking our equality seriously. Two suggestions are that a cosmopolitan should endorse a 'global difference principle' and a 'principle of global equality of opportunity'. In the first part of this paper I examine (...)
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  36.  20
    Ruth R. Faden, Liza Dawson, Alison S. Bateman‐House, Dawn Mueller Agnew, Hilary Bok, Dan W. Brock, Aravinda Chakravarti, Xiao‐Jiang Gao, Mark Greene, John A. Hansen, Patricia A. King, Stephen J. O'Brien, David H. Sachs, Kathryn E. Schill, Andrew Siegel, Davor Solter, Sonia M. Suter, Catherine M. Verfaillie, Leroy B. Walters & John D. Gearhart (2003). Public Stem Cell Banks: Considerations of Justice in Stem Cell Research and Therapy. Hastings Center Report 33 (6):13-27.
    If stem cell-based therapies are developed, we will likely confront a difficult problem of justice: for biological reasons alone, the new therapies might benefit only a limited range of patients. In fact, they might benefit primarily white Americans, thereby exacerbating long-standing differences in health and health care.
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  37.  15
    Gerald Dworkin, Allen E. Buchanan & Dan W. Brock (1991). Deciding for Others. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (162):118.
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  38. G. Brock (2013). Globalizing Justice: The Ethics of Poverty and Power. Philosophical Review 122 (2):318-322.
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  39. Judith Jarvis Thomson, Dan W. Brock, Paul J. Weithman, Gerald Dworkin, F. M. Kamm, J. David Velleman & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (1999). 10. Uma Narayan, Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism Uma Narayan, Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism (Pp. 668-671). [REVIEW] Ethics 109 (3).
     
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  40. Adrian C. Brock (2012). Review Symposium A Reply to the Reply. History of the Human Sciences 25 (3):148-153.
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  41.  50
    Gillian Brock (2011). Cosmopolitanism Versus Noncosmopolitanism. The Monist 94 (4):455-465.
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  42. Gillian Brock (2005). The Difference Principle, Equality of Opportunity, and Cosmopolitan Justice. Journal of Moral Philosophy 2 (3):333-351.
    What kinds of principles of justice should a cosmopolitan support? In recent years some have argued that a cosmopolitan should endorse a Global Difference Principle. It has also been suggested that a cosmopolitan should support a Principle of Global Equality of Opportunity. In this paper I examine how compelling these two suggestions are. I argue against a Global Difference Principle, but for an alternative Needs-Based Minimum Floor Principle (where these are not co-extensive, as I explain). Though I support a negative (...)
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  43.  7
    Roger Brock & J. Ober (2001). The Athenian Revolution. Essays on Ancient Greek Democracy and Political Theory. Journal of Hellenic Studies 121:198.
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  44.  38
    Dan W. Brock (2000). Broadening the Bioethics Agenda. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (1):21-38.
    : Bioethics has focused principally on ethical issues arising in clinical medicine. When it has addressed justice or equity, it has focused on access to health care and on defending a general moral right to health care. This dual focus on establishing a right to health care and on health care rather than health has left bioethics largely silent on two issues of fundamental importance for a full account of justice and health. First, the focus on establishing a right to (...)
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  45.  42
    Gillian Brock (2008). What Do We Owe Others as a Matter of Global Justice and Does National Membership Matter? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (4):433-448.
    David Miller offers us a sophisticated account of how we can reconcile global obligations and duties to co?nationals. In this article I focus on four weaknesses with his account such as the following two. First, there remains considerable unclarity about the strength of the positive duties we have to non?nationals and how these measure up relative to other positive duties, such as the ones Miller believes we have to co?nationals to implement civil, political, or social rights. Second, just how responsibilities (...)
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  46. Dan W. Brock (2005). Shaping Future Children: Parental Rights and Societal Interests. Journal of Political Philosophy 13 (4):377–398.
  47. Dan W. Brock (2007). Health Care Resource Prioritization and Rationing: Why is It so Difficult? Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (1):125-148.
    Rationing is the allocation of a good under conditions of scarcity, which necessarily implies that some who want and could be benefitted by that good will not receive it. One reflection of our ambivalence towards health care rationing is reflected in our resistance to having it distributed in a market like most other goods—most Americans reject ability to pay as the basis for distributing health care. They do not view health care as just another commodity to be distributed by markets. (...)
     
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  48.  5
    Steven R. Smith & Gillian Brock (2014). Understanding Well-Being in Policy and Practice. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (3):215-217.
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  49.  67
    Gillian Brock (2002). Cosmopolitan Democracy and Justice: Held Versus Kymlicka. Studies in East European Thought 54 (4):325-347.
    There has been much interest in cosmopolitan models of democracy in recent times. Arguably, the most developed of these is the model articulated by David Held, so it is not surprising that it has received the most attention and criticism. In this paper, I outline Held's model of cosmopolitan democracy and consider the objections Will Kymlicka raises to this account. I argue that Kymlicka's objections do not undermine Held's central claims and that Held's cosmopolitanism remains a very promising model that (...)
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  50.  3
    D. W. Brock (2014). Reflections on the Patient Preference Predictor Proposal. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (2):153-160.
    There are substantial data establishing that surrogates are often mistaken in predicting what treatments incompetent patients would have wanted and that supplements such as advance directives have not resulted in significant improvements. Rid and Wendler’s Patient Preference Predictor (PPP) proposal will attempt to gather data about what similar patients would prefer in a variety of treatment choices. It accepts the usual goal of patient autonomy and the Substituted Judgment principle for surrogate decisions. I provide reasons for questioning sole reliance on (...)
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