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Rob Inkpen [3]Robert John Inkpen [2]Robert Inkpen [1]
  1. The Topography of Historical Contingency.Rob Inkpen & Derek Turner - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):1-19.
    Abstract Starting with Ben-Menahem's definition of historical contingency as sensitivity to variations in initial conditions, we suggest that historical events and processes can be thought of as forming a complex landscape of contingency and necessity. We suggest three different ways of extending and elaborating Ben-Menahem's concepts: (1) By supplementing them with a notion of historical disturbance; (2) by pointing out that contingency and necessity are subject to scaling effects; (3) by showing how degrees of contingency/necessity can change over time. We (...)
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    Science, Philosophy and Physical Geography.Robert Inkpen - 2005 - Routledge.
    This accessible and engaging text explores the relationship between philosophy, science and physical geography. It addresses an imbalance that exists in opinion, teaching and to a lesser extent research, between a philosophically enriched human geography and a perceived philosophically ignorant physical geography. Science, Philosophy and Physical Geography , challenges the myth that there is a single self-evident scientific method, that can and is applied in a straightforward manner by physical geographers. It demonstrates the variety of alternative philosophical perspectives. Furthermore it (...)
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    Brill Online Books and Journals.Rob Inkpen & Derek Turner - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):1-19.
    Starting with Ben-Menahem’s definition of historical contingency as sensitivity to variations in initial conditions, we suggest that historical events and processes can be thought of as forming a complex landscape of contingency and necessity. We suggest three different ways of extending and elaborating Ben-Menahem’s concepts: By supplementing them with a notion of historical disturbance; by pointing out that contingency and necessity are subject to scaling effects; by showing how degrees of contingency/necessity can change over time. We also argue that further (...)
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    Explaining the Past in the Geosciences.Giuseppina D'oro, Mark Day, Luke O'sullivan, Jakub Capek, Nick Tosh, Adrian Haddock & Robert John Inkpen - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (4):495-507.
    Abductive reasoning is central to reconstructing the past in the geosciences. This paper outlines the nature of the abductive method and restates it in Bayesian terms. Evidence plays a key role in this working method and, in particular, traces of the past are important in this explanatory framework. Traces, whether singularly or as groups, are interpreted within the context of the event for which they have evidential claims. Traces are not considered as independent entities but rather as inter-related pieces of (...)
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    Explaining the past in the geosciences.Robert John Inkpen - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (4):495-507.
    Abductive reasoning is central to reconstructing the past in the geosciences. This paper outlines the nature of the abductive method and restates it in Bayesian terms. Evidence plays a key role in this working method and, in particular, traces of the past are important in this explanatory framework. Traces, whether singularly or as groups, are interpreted within the context of the event for which they have evidential claims. Traces are not considered as independent entities but rather as inter-related pieces of (...)
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    The Philosophy of Geology.Rob Inkpen - 2008 - In Aviezer Tucker (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophy of History and Historiography. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 318–329.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Identifying Unique Events Representing Events Unique Events and Explanation in Scientific Historiography Illustration of Evidence and Events Conclusion References.
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