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  1.  58
    Civilization and the Poetics of Slavery.Robbie Shilliam - 2012 - Thesis Eleven 108 (1):99-117.
    Civilizational analysis is increasingly being used to capture the plurality of routes to and through the modern world order. However, the concept of civilization betrays a colonial legacy, namely, a denial that colonized peoples possessed the creative ability to cultivate their own subjecthoods. This denial was especially acute when it came to enslaved Africans in the New World whose bodies were imagined to be deracinated and deculturated. This article proposes that civilizational analysis has yet to fully address this legacy and, (...)
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  2.  4
    Behind the Rhodes Statue: Black Competency and the Imperial Academy.Robbie Shilliam - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (5):3-27.
    Recent criticisms of the Rhodes Must Fall Oxford campaign have problematized the presence of Black bodies within British higher education by reference to an ideal image of the impartial and discerning academy. In this article, I historically and intellectually contextualize the apprehension, expressed in the debates over RMF Oxford, that an intimate Black presence destabilizes the ethos of higher education. Specifically, I argue that much more than Rhodes’ statue implicates the British academy in the Empire’s southern African interests. I excavate (...)
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  3.  10
    Colonial Architecture or Relatable Hinterlands? Locke, Nandy, Fanon, and the Bandung Spirit.Robbie Shilliam - 2016 - Constellations 23 (3):425-435.
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  4. German Thought and International Relations: The Rise and Fall of a Liberal Project.Robbie Shilliam - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
  5.  6
    Indebtedness and the Curation of a Black Archive: Comments on David Goldberg’s Conversation with Achille Mbembe.Robbie Shilliam - 2018 - Theory, Culture and Society 35 (7-8):229-235.
    Addressing Mbembe’s interview with Goldberg and reflecting upon the book – Critique of Black Reason – that the interview probes, the author points to a tension in Mbembe’s thought. Mbembe apprehends black reason as all-at-once ‘reason’s unreason’ and the remaking-reasonable of reason. In this respect, there is a clear sense of a simultaneity of imposition–struggle and destruction–repair. Yet this ethos of simultaneity is in tension with Mbembe’s sequential exposition of the black archive, especially the indebtedness of the ‘response’ by blacks (...)
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  6.  5
    Marxs Path to Capital: The International Dimension of an Intellectual Journey.Robbie Shilliam - 2006 - History of Political Thought 27 (2):349-375.
    This article seeks to contextualize Marx's path to the Capital volumes through what might be called its 'international dimension'. It explores how Marx experienced an array of differentially developed yet related societies through a consciousness of backwardness, and how this consciousness moulded his praxis. In this respect, the article takes issue with the Marxist assumption that the silence in Capital regarding the multi-linear character of modern world development is ultimately non- harmful to the volumes' uni-linear notion of modern world development. (...)
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  7.  5
    On Africa in Oceania: Thinking Besides the Subaltern.Robbie Shilliam - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (7-8):374-381.
    In this text, written in relation to my book The Black Pacific, I introduce the connections of the Black Pacific, especially those by which Māori and Pasifika struggles against land dispossession, settler colonialism and racism connect with the struggles of African peoples against slavery, colonialism and racism. Sociologically, historically and geographically speaking, these connections between colonized and postcolonized peoples appear to be extremely thin, almost ephemeral. But those who critically cultivate these connections know otherwise. In addressing how they might know (...)
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