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  1. Darwinizing Culture: The Status of Memetics as a Science.Robert Aunger (ed.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Darwinizing culture: the status of memetics as a science pits leading intellectuals, , against each other to battle it out, in this, the first debate over 'memes'. With a foreword by Daniel Dennett, and contributions from Dan Sperber, David Hull, Robert Boyd, Susan Blackmore, Henry Plotkin, and others, the result is a thrilling and challenging debate that will perhaps mark a turning point for the field, and for future research.
     
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    The Life History of Culture Learning in a Face‐to‐Face Society.Robert Aunger - 2000 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 28 (3):445-481.
  3.  66
    Kinds of Behaviour.Robert Aunger & Valerie Curtis - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (3):317-345.
    Sciences able to identify appropriate analytical units for their domain, their natural kinds, have tended to be more progressive. In the biological sciences, evolutionary natural kinds are adaptations that can be identified by their common history of selection for some function. Human brains are the product of an evolutionary history of selection for component systems which produced behaviours that gave adaptive advantage to their hosts. These structures, behaviour production systems, are the natural kinds that psychology seeks. We argue these can (...)
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    Culture Evolves Only If There is Cultural Inheritance.Robert Aunger - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):347-348.
    Mesoudi et al. argue that the current inability to identify the means by which cultural traits are acquired does not debilitate their project to draw clear parallels between cultural and biological evolution. However, I suggest that cultural phenomena may be accounted for by biological processes, unless we can identify a cultural “genotype” that carries information from person to person independently of genes. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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    Unintentional Behaviour Change.Robert Aunger & Valerie Curtis - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (4):418.
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    The “Core Meme” Meme.Robert Aunger - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):569-570.
    Differences in mutation rates, transmission chain-length, phenotypic manifestations, or the relative complexity of the mental representations in which they are embedded do not distinguish between “core” (intramodular) and “developing” (intermodular) memes, as Atran suggests. Dividing memes into types seems premature when our knowledge of mental representation is as imprecise as the unit of biological inheritance was in Darwin's time.
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    Acknowledgment: Guest Reviewers.Hervé Abdi, Fred Adams, Shaaron Ainsworth, Erik Altmann, Richard Aslin, Robert Aunger, Jerry Balakrishnan, Dana Ballard, Sieghard Beller & Iris Berent - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28:1041-1043.
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    The Life History of Culture Learning in a Face-to-Face Society.Robert Aunger - 2000 - Ethos 28 (3):445-481.
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    Phenogenotypes Break Up Under Countervailing Evolutionary Pressures.Robert Aunger - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):147-147.
    The phenogenotype, a routinely co-occuring combination of a cultural and genetic trait, is unlikely to survive over time because of the potentially varying evolutionary pressures upon cultural as opposed to genetic traits. This is because the production and evaluation of cultural inputs will themselves be based on information previously acquired culturally. As a result, treating both cultural and genetic inheritance in a single recursion may be problematic.
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  10. Gaining Control: How Human Behavior Evolved.Robert Aunger & Valerie Curtis - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    'Gaining control' tells the story of how human behavioral capacities evolved from those of other animal species. Exploring what is known about the psychological capacities of other groups of animals, the authors reconstruct a fascinating history of our own mental evolution. The result is a provocative and insightful book.
     
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  11. Memes.Robert Aunger - 2009 - In Robin Dunbar & Louise Barrett (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  12. Reflexive Ethnographic Science.Robert Aunger - 2004
     
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