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Robert Cowan [24]Robert P. Cowan [1]
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Robert Cowan
University of Glasgow
  1. Perceptual Intuitionism.Robert Cowan - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (1):164-193.
    In the recent metaethical literature there has been significant interest in the prospects for what I am denoting ‘Perceptual Intuitionism’: the view that normal ethical agents can and do have non-inferential justification for first-order ethical beliefs by having ethical perceptual experiences, e.g., Cullison 2010, McBrayer 2010, Vayrynen 2008. If true, it promises to constitute an independent a posteriori intuitionist epistemology, providing an alternative to intuitionist accounts which posit a priori intuition and/or emotion as sources of non-inferentially justified ethical beliefs. As (...)
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  2. Epistemic Perceptualism and Neo-Sentimentalist Objections.Robert Cowan - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):59-81.
    Epistemic Perceptualists claim that emotions are sources of immediate defeasible justification for evaluative propositions that can sometimes ground undefeated immediately justified evaluative beliefs. For example, fear can constitute the justificatory ground for a belief that some object or event is dangerous. Despite its attractiveness, the view is apparently vulnerable to several objections. In this paper, I provide a limited defence of Epistemic Perceptualism by responding to a family of objections which all take as a premise a popular and attractive view (...)
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  3. Evaluative Perception: Introduction.Anna Bergqvist & Robert Cowan - 2018 - In Anna Bergqvist & Robert Cowan (eds.), Evaluative Perception. Oxford University Press.
    In this Introduction we introduce the central themes of the Evaluative Perception volume. After identifying historical and recent contemporary work on this topic, we discuss some central questions under three headings: (1) Questions about the Existence and Nature of Evaluative Perception: Are there perceptual experiences of values? If so, what is their nature? Are experiences of values sui generis? Are values necessary for certain kinds of experience? (2) Questions about the Epistemology of Evaluative Perception: Can evaluative experiences ever justify evaluative (...)
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  4. Clarifying Ethical Intuitionism.Robert Cowan - unknown
    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in Ethical Intuitionism, whose core claim is that normal ethical agents can and do have non-inferentially justified first-order ethical beliefs. Although this is the standard formulation, there are two senses in which it is importantly incomplete. Firstly, ethical intuitionism claims that there are non-inferentially justified ethical beliefs, but there is a worrying lack of consensus in the ethical literature as to what non-inferentially justified belief is. Secondly, it has been overlooked (...)
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  5. Cognitive Penetrability and Ethical Perception.Robert Cowan - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (4):665-682.
    In recent years there has been renewed philosophical interest in the thesis that perceptual experience is cognitively penetrable, i.e., roughly, the view that the contents and/or character of a subject's perceptual experience can be modified by what a subject believes and desires. As has been widely noted, it is plausible that cognitive penetration has implications for perception's epistemic role. On the one hand, penetration could make agents insensitive to the world in a way which epistemically 'downgrades' their experience. On the (...)
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  6. Rossian Conceptual Intuitionism.Robert Cowan - 2017 - Ethics 127 (4):821-851.
    In this article I assess Rossian Intuitionism, which is the view that the Rossian Principles of Duty are self-evident. I begin by motivating and clarifying a version of the view—Rossian Conceptual Intuitionism—that hasn’t been adequately considered by Rossians. After defending it against a series of significant objections, I show that enthusiasm for Rossian Conceptual Intuitionism should be muted. Specifically, I argue that we lack sufficient reason for thinking that the Rossian Principles are self-evident, and that insisting that they are self-evident (...)
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  7.  43
    Moral Motivation and the Affective Appeal.Jennifer Corns & Robert Cowan - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    Proponents of “the affective appeal” :787–812, 2014; Zagzebski in Philos Phenomenol Res 66:104–124, 2003) argue that we can make progress in the longstanding debate about the nature of moral motivation by appealing to the affective dimension of affective episodes such as emotions, which allegedly play either a causal or constitutive role in moral judgements. Specifically, they claim that appealing to affect vindicates a version of Motivational Internalism—roughly, the view that there is a necessary connection between moral judgment and motivation—that is (...)
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  8.  67
    The Puzzle of Moral Memory.Robert Cowan - 2020 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 17 (2):202-228.
    A largely overlooked and puzzling feature of morality is Moral Memory: apparent cases of directly memorising, remembering, and forgetting first-order moral propositions seem odd. To illustrate: consider someone apparently memorising that capital punishment is wrong, or acting as if they are remembering that euthanasia is permissible, or reporting that they have forgotten that torture is wrong. I here clarify Moral Memory and identify desiderata of good explanations. I then proceed to amend the only extant account, Bugeja’s Non-Cognitivist explanation, but show (...)
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  9. Epistemic Sentimentalism and Epistemic Reason-Responsiveness.Robert Cowan - 2018 - In Anna Bergqvist & Robert Cowan (eds.), Evaluative Perception. Oxford University Press.
    Epistemic Sentimentalism is the view that emotional experiences such as fear and guilt are a source of immediate justification for evaluative beliefs. For example, guilt can sometimes immediately justify a subject’s belief that they have done something wrong. In this paper I focus on a family of objections to Epistemic Sentimentalism that all take as a premise the claim that emotions possess a normative property that is apparently antithetical to it: epistemic reason-responsiveness, i.e., emotions have evidential bases and justifications can (...)
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  10.  8
    Electrophysiology and Structural Connectivity of the Posterior Hypothalamic Region: Much to Learn From a Rare Indication of Deep Brain Stimulation.Bina Kakusa, Sabir Saluja, David Y. A. Dadey, Daniel A. N. Barbosa, Sandra Gattas, Kai J. Miller, Robert P. Cowan, Zepure Kouyoumdjian, Nader Pouratian & Casey H. Halpern - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  11. C.D. Broad on Moral Sense Theories in Ethics.Robert Cowan - 2015 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Virtual Issue: Methods of Ethics (3):168-183.
    C.D. Broad’s Reflections stands out as one of the few serious examinations of Moral Sense Theory in twentieth century analytic philosophy. It also constitutes an excellent discussion of the interconnections that allegedly exist between questions concerning what Broad calls the ‘logical analysis’ of moral judgments and questions about their epistemology. In this paper I make three points concerning the interconnectedness of the analytical and epistemological elements of versions of Moral Sense Theory. First, I make a general point about Broad’s association (...)
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  12.  18
    Evaluative Perception: Introduction.Anna Bergqvist & Robert Cowan (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    In this Introduction we introduce the central themes of the Evaluative Perception volume. After identifying historical and recent contemporary work on this topic, we discuss some central questions under three headings: Questions about the Existence and Nature of Evaluative Perception: Are there perceptual experiences of values? If so, what is their nature? Are experiences of values sui generis? Are values necessary for certain kinds of experience? Questions about the Epistemology of Evaluative Perception: Can evaluative experiences ever justify evaluative judgments? Are (...)
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  13. Moral Perception, by Robert Audi.Robert Cowan - 2014 - Mind 123 (492):1167-1171.
  14.  12
    Purchasing Priam: Bilingual Wordplay at Plautus Bacchides 976–7.Robert Cowan - 2014 - Classical Quarterly 64 (2):844-847.
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  15.  11
    Of Gods, Men and Stout Fellows: Cicero on Sallustius' Empedoclea.Robert Cowan - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):764-771.
    Cicero's letter to his brother Quintus from February 54 is best known for containing the sole explicit contemporary reference to Lucretius’ De rerum natura, but it is also notable as the source of the only extant reference of any kind to another philosophical didactic poem, Sallustius’ Empedoclea .3= SB 14): Lucretii poemata, ut scribis, ita sunt: multis luminibus ingenii, multae tamen artis. sed, cum ueneris. uirum te putabo, si Sallusti Empedoclea legeris; hominem non putabo. Lucretius’ poems are just as you (...)
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  16.  6
    Nothing To Do With Phaedra? Aristophanes, Thesmophoriazusae 497–501.Robert Cowan - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (1):315-320.
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  17.  11
    Virgil's Cucumber Again: Columella 10.378–92.Robert Cowan - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (1):286-.
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  18.  4
    Thrasymennus' Wanton Wedding: Etymology, Genre, And Virtus In Silius Italicus, Punica.Robert Cowan - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (1):226-237.
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  19.  5
    Thrasymennus' Wanton Wedding: Etymology, Genre, and Virtus in Silius Italicus, Punica.Robert Cowan - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (1):226-.
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  20.  2
    How's Your Father? A Recurrent Bilingual Wordplay in Martial.Robert Cowan - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (2):736-746.
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  21.  1
    Virgil's Cucumber Again: Columella 10.378–92.Robert Cowan - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (1):286-289.
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  22.  21
    Critical Thinking: A Concise Guide. 5th Edition.Tracy Bowell, Robert Cowan & Gary Kemp - 2019 - Routledge.
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  23. Boys Will Not Be Boys: Idolizing the Inhuman in Musil’s Törless.Robert Cowan - 2015 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 44 (2):175-192.
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  24. Taliban Poetry for Veterans: On Critical Pedagogy.Robert Cowan - 2018 - In Nicoletta Pireddu (ed.), Reframing Critical, Literary, and Cultural Theories: Thought on the Edge. Springer Verlag. pp. 235-254.
    This essay explores the utility of critical pedagogy by looking at competing definitions and considering the response of Turkish-American Afghanistan War veteran, Eymen, and his Introduction to Poetry classmates to interviews with Afghan Nobel peace laureate Malala Yousafzai and poetry written by Taliban fighters. Students develop profoundly negative feelings about the Taliban through specific sources, if they did not already feel that way; then, are exposed to a sentimental side of these fighters, who use the medieval ghazal poetry form to (...)
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