68 found
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  1.  6
    Preparing for the Death of a Loved One.Robert Ginsberg - 2019 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 33 (1).
    It often makes for interesting discussion whether or not knowledge of survival evidence makes one more prepared for the death of a loved one. Raw emotion will almost always win out over intellectual reasoning, so the very notion of being prepared may be nothing more than fanciful thinking. However, a recent occurrence in my life has led me to believe that knowledge and experience can lead to acceptance. After losing my fifteen year old daughter in the blink of an eye (...)
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  2.  34
    Teaching Philosophy Teaches for the Teacher.Robert Ginsberg - 1988 - Philosophie Et Culture: Actes du XVIIe Congrès Mondial de Philosophie 5:491-492.
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  3.  23
    The Future of Interplanetary Ethics.Robert Ginsberg - 1971 - Journal of Social Philosophy 2 (2):5-7.
  4.  12
    Introduction.Robert Ginsberg - 1986 - Journal of Social Philosophy 17 (3):3-6.
  5.  45
    Report From Hiroshima (1).Robert Ginsberg - 1987 - The Acorn 2 (2):13-14.
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  6.  28
    Robert Ginsberg, J.Z. Hubert, Philemon A. Peonides, Dinal V. Picotti C.Robert Ginsberg, J. Z. Hubert, Philemon A. Peonides & Dinal V. Picotti C. - 1988 - Philosophie Et Culture: Actes du XVIIe Congrès Mondial de Philosophie 5:613-613.
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  7.  67
    Kant and Hobbes on the Social Contract.Robert Ginsberg - 1974 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):115-119.
  8.  47
    Retrospective and Prospective.Robert Ginsberg - 1991 - Journal of Value Inquiry 25 (1):1-4.
  9.  37
    The Philosophy of Art.Robert Ginsberg - 1992 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):250-251.
    Unabashedly metaphysical in his treatment of aesthetics, F. W. J. Schelling’s lectures are a bold effort to fill a gap in his system of Idealistic philosophy. He had to treat the philosophy of art because “Philosophy is absolutely and essentially one: it cannot be subdivided”. The titanic system that Schelling insists on bringing on stage to study art is enough to frighten the wits out of current-day aestheticians. The theoretical movement here is downward from the Olympian heights of absolutism through (...)
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  10.  43
    Report From Hiroshima (2).Robert Ginsberg - 1987 - The Acorn 2 (2):18-18.
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  11.  41
    Pascal: Sa Grande Tentation De L’Infini Rèel.Robert Ginsberg - 1992 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):248-249.
    Pascal, the mathematical genius, intellectually explored the curious notion of the mathematically infinite, and Pascal, the saintly mystic, experienced passionately the ineffable presence of the existentially infinite, God. In this ingenious essay, Gabriel Mony traces Pascal’s movement from one infinite to the other. The before and after for Pascal is divided by his “Night of Fire.” Mony argues that before Pascal was tempted by the rationalist vision of understanding all nature through mathematical reasoning. Since God designed the universe mathematically, the (...)
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  12.  32
    Emerson and Tagore: The Poet As Philosopher.Robert Ginsberg - 1992 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):251-252.
    The Indian, Rabindranath Tagore, and the American, Ralph Waldo Emerson, were poets and lecturers with a philosophical bent whose insights sprang from a common grounding in absolute idealism and who played a prominent role as public sages in the cultural renaissance of their countries. They are perfect figures for comparative study. Yeager Hudson pursues that study with appropriate familiarity, willingness to expound the intricacy, and admirably equitable judgment. He doubly rewards the general reader by introducing us to each of the (...)
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  13.  28
    The Ways of Peace: A Philosophy of Peace As Action.Robert Ginsberg - 1988 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):249-249.
    Western civilization since the Renaissance, argues Gray Cox, conceives of material things as objectively knowable and hence manipulable by the detached subject. We knowers are masters of nature. The presuppositions about how things are known and used also color our attitudes concerning human problems. Our culture is conflict centered. When we try to give substance to the concept of peace we draw a blank: peace is the static absence of war. We do not bring peace to fruition because we have (...)
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  14.  32
    Philosophers Look at Science Fiction.Robert Ginsberg - 1984 - Idealistic Studies 14 (2):172-172.
    Smith and Fred D. Miller, Jr., make sweeping claims for the intellectual importance of science fiction, putting heavy weight on its pedagogical and problem-raising values. But these values appear secondary. What if science fiction is primarily a form of fiction—not wisdom-seeking but pleasure-giving? Lee F. Werth pens a “story” which is all discussion about time travel. It is unclear what it proves. Monte Cook offers brilliant and amusing paradoxes on time machines, including the oddity of visiting oneself in the past. (...)
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  15.  21
    The Ways of Peace: A Philosophy of Peace As Action.Robert Ginsberg - 1988 - Idealistic Studies 18 (3):281-282.
    Western civilization since the Renaissance, argues Gray Cox, conceives of material things as objectively knowable and hence manipulable by the detached subject. We knowers are masters of nature. The presuppositions about how things are known and used also color our attitudes concerning human problems. Our culture is conflict centered. When we try to give substance to the concept of peace, we draw a blank: peace is the static absence of war. We do not bring peace to fruition because we have (...)
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  16. Social Contract and the Elimination of War.Robert Ginsberg - 1966 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
     
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  17.  25
    The Law as Literature.Robert Ginsberg - 1991 - Social Philosophy Today 6:249-265.
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  18.  8
    The Philosopher as Writer: The Eighteenth Century.Robert Ginsberg - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):398-399.
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  19.  29
    Human Rights.Robert Ginsberg - 1983 - Idealistic Studies 13 (2):173-174.
    Human rights, the topic of the September 1978 meeting of the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy, is a splendid choice for the high-level multidisciplined focus of that Society, which has generated the Nomos Yearbooks. But this volume does not live up to the reputation of the series. Its contents are uneven in length, scope, polish, and significance. Editing is poor; proofreading is disastrous. Painfully evident are the games professionals play. The undoubted talent here does not live up to (...)
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  20.  5
    Plurality of Worlds: The Origins of the Extraterrestrial Life Debate From Democritus to Kant. [REVIEW]Robert Ginsberg - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (1):129-130.
    That life probably exists on other bodies in the universe is now a commonplace. That intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe--taking for granted its presence on earth--is a widespread hope. Scientific efforts are under way, including space probes, special observations, and broadcast programs, in the systematic search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The question naturally arises whether other human beings are somewhere out there. Fresh avenues of philosophic reflection are opening concerning ethics, theology, and the metaphysics of being human. Imagination has (...)
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  21.  40
    The Value of Philosophy: A Dialogue. [REVIEW]Robert Ginsberg - 1990 - Journal of Value Inquiry 24 (1):31-42.
  22.  33
    Locke, Hobbes, and the Federalist Papers.Robert Ginsberg - 1984 - International Studies in Philosophy 16 (3):101-102.
  23.  33
    The Peace Process.Robert Ginsberg - 1988 - Social Philosophy Today 1:325-332.
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  24.  14
    The Ways of Peace: A Philosophy of Peace As Action. [REVIEW]Robert Ginsberg - 1992 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):249-249.
    Western civilization since the Renaissance, argues Gray Cox, conceives of material things as objectively knowable and hence manipulable by the detached subject. We knowers are masters of nature. The presuppositions about how things are known and used also color our attitudes concerning human problems. Our culture is conflict centered. When we try to give substance to the concept of peace we draw a blank: peace is the static absence of war. We do not bring peace to fruition because we have (...)
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  25.  34
    Countertheses: On Law and Disorder: The Place of Political Philosophy in Politics.Robert Ginsberg - 1970 - World Futures 8 (3):29-53.
  26.  13
    Self and Others: A Reply to Ramon Lemos, “Egoism and Non-Egoism in Ethics”.Robert Ginsberg - 1973 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):254-259.
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  27.  35
    Three Tests for Democracy by David Braybrooke.Laszlo Versenyi, Robert Ginsberg & Joseph Margolis - 1971 - World Futures 9 (1):122-139.
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  28.  18
    Self and Others.Robert Ginsberg - 1973 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):254-259.
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  29. Anthony Wilden, The Rules Are No Game: The Strategy of Communication Reviewed By.Robert Ginsberg - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9 (1):39-42.
     
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  30.  5
    Basic Problems of Philosophy.Robert Ginsberg - 1966 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 26 (4):598-602.
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  31.  10
    Pascal: Sa Grande Tentation De L’Infini Rèel. [REVIEW]Robert Ginsberg - 1992 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):248-249.
    Pascal, the mathematical genius, intellectually explored the curious notion of the mathematically infinite, and Pascal, the saintly mystic, experienced passionately the ineffable presence of the existentially infinite, God. In this ingenious essay, Gabriel Mony traces Pascal’s movement from one infinite to the other. The before and after for Pascal is divided by his “Night of Fire.” Mony argues that before Pascal was tempted by the rationalist vision of understanding all nature through mathematical reasoning. Since God designed the universe mathematically, the (...)
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  32.  10
    Peter T. Manicas "The Death of the State". [REVIEW]Robert Ginsberg - 1975 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (4):581.
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  33.  24
    In Memoriam.Robert Ginsberg - 1990 - Idealistic Studies 20 (1):922 - 923.
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  34.  9
    Emerson and Tagore: The Poet As Philosopher. [REVIEW]Robert Ginsberg - 1992 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):251-252.
    The Indian, Rabindranath Tagore, and the American, Ralph Waldo Emerson, were poets and lecturers with a philosophical bent whose insights sprang from a common grounding in absolute idealism and who played a prominent role as public sages in the cultural renaissance of their countries. They are perfect figures for comparative study. Yeager Hudson pursues that study with appropriate familiarity, willingness to expound the intricacy, and admirably equitable judgment. He doubly rewards the general reader by introducing us to each of the (...)
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  35.  9
    Locke, Hobbes, and the Federalist Papers: An Essay on the Genesis of the American Political Heritage. [REVIEW]Robert Ginsberg - 1984 - International Studies in Philosophy 16 (3):101-102.
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  36.  20
    The Function of the University in Society.Robert Ginsberg - 1992 - Social Philosophy Today 7:139-148.
  37.  19
    Plurality of Worlds.Robert Ginsberg - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (1):129-131.
  38.  20
    In Favor of Crying “Fire!” in a Crowded Theater.Robert Ginsberg - 1972 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):91-98.
  39.  7
    The Peace Process: Peace as Process.Robert Ginsberg - 1988 - Social Philosophy Today 1:325-332.
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  40.  17
    Philosophical Activity and War.Robert Ginsberg - 1972 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 33 (2):174-185.
    What should philosophers do about war? That question has been answered in various ways throughout the history of philosophy, and it appears to still trouble members of this distinguished profession in these times. A reason for the current uneasiness is that while philosophy in our century has largely neglected the problem of the world, it is apparent that there will soon be no world for philosophers to neglect unless an antidote for war is found. Since psychologists, statesmen, religious leaders, and (...)
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  41.  15
    The Limits of Obligation.Robert Ginsberg - 1984 - International Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):95-96.
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  42. Robert C. Solomon and Kathleen M. Higgins, Eds., The Philosophy of (Erotic) Love Reviewed By.Robert Ginsberg - 1993 - Philosophy in Review 13 (1):61-63.
     
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  43.  8
    Warren E. Steinkraus 1922-1990.Robert Ginsberg - 1990 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 63 (7):46 - 47.
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  44.  13
    Ghosts, Demons, and Henry James: "The Turn of the Screw" at the Turn of the Century (Review).Robert Ginsberg - 1990 - Philosophy and Literature 14 (2):412-413.
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  45.  14
    Steps Forward.Robert Ginsberg - 1992 - Journal of Value Inquiry 26 (2):159-162.
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  46.  14
    Eouality and Justice in the Declarstion of Independence.Robert Ginsberg - 1975 - Journal of Social Philosophy 6 (1):6-9.
  47.  14
    The Right to Privacy Vs. Governmental Need to Know.Robert Ginsberg - 1973 - Journal of Social Philosophy 4 (2):5-8.
  48.  12
    Five Problems in the Philosophy of War.Robert Ginsberg - 1978 - Journal of Social Philosophy 9 (3):8-12.
  49.  6
    Experiencing Aesthetically, Aesthetic Experience, and Experience in Aesthetics.Robert Ginsberg - 1986 - In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic. pp. 61--78.
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  50.  8
    Social Aesthetics: The Moonlanding and Teee Imagination.Robert Ginsberg - 1976 - Journal of Social Philosophy 7 (2):1-5.
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