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  1.  66
    End-of-Life Decision Making across Cultures.Robert H. Blank - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):201-214.
    Even more so than in other areas of medicine, issues at the end of life elucidate the importance of religion and culture, as well as the role of the family and other social structures, in how these issues are framed. This article presents an overview of the variation in end-of-life treatment issues across 12 highly disparate countries. It finds that many assumptions held in the western bioethics literature are not easily transferred to other cultural settings.
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  2.  26
    End-of-Life Decision Making across Cultures.Robert H. Blank - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):201-214.
    As is evident from the other articles in this special issue, end-of-life treatment has engendered a vigorous dialogue in the United States over the past few decades because decision making at the end of life raises broad and difficult ethical issues that touch on health professionals, patients, and their families. This concern is exacerbated by the high cost related to the end of life in the U.S. Moreover, in light of demographic patterns, progressively scarce health care resources, and an expanding (...)
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  3.  20
    Alzheimer's Disease — Perspective from Political Science: Public Policy Issues.Robert H. Blank - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (3):724-743.
    The paper outlines the policy context and summarizes the numerous policy issues that AD raises from the more generic to the unique. It posits that strong public fears of AD and its future prevalence projections and costs, raise increasingly difficult policy dilemmas. After reviewing the costs in human lives and money and discussing the latest U.S. policy initiatives, the paper presents two policy areas as examples the demanding policy decisions we face. The first focuses on the basic regulatory function of (...)
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  4. Books available for review.Theodor W. Adorno, Bernard Berofsky, Robert H. Blank, Andre L. Bonnicksen, Irene Bloom & Joshua A. Fogel - 1996 - Auslegung 21:159.
     
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  5. Books available.Frederick C. Beiser, Wolfgang Benhabib, John McCole, Bernard Berofsky, Robert H. Blank & Andre L. Bonnicksen - 1996 - Auslegung 21.
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  6.  7
    Cognitive enhancement: social and public policy issues.Robert H. Blank - 2016 - New York, NY: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Rapid advances in cognitive neuroscience and converging technologies have led to a vigorous debate over cognitive enhancement. This book outlines the ethical and social issues, but goes on to focus on the policy dimensions, which until now have received much less attention. As the economic, social and personal stakes involved with cognitive enhancement are so high, and the advances in knowledge so swift, we are likely to see increasing demands for government involvement in cognitive enhancement techniques. The book therefore places (...)
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  7.  7
    Human Genetic Intervention: Portent of a Brave New World?Robert H. Blank - 1989 - Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies 1 (1-2):103-121.
    The centerpiece of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World is state control of the human reproduction process as a means of ensuring social stability. Although written as fiction, recent advances in human genetic and reproductive technology promise to give us more control over our biological destiny, including procreation. Concurrently, they create new social policy dilemmas, challenge prevailing "givens" of the human condition, and, technologically, increase the possibility of centralized control over reproduction. After reviewing the current status of human genetic technology and (...)
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  8.  4
    Human Sterilization: Emerging Technologies and Reemerging Social Issues.Robert H. Blank - 1984 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 9 (3):9-20.
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  9.  40
    Public policy implications of human genetic technology: Genetic screening.Robert H. Blank - 1982 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7 (4):355-374.
    As rapid advances in human genetic research are transferred into new areas of genetic technology, questions relatingto the use of these techniques will escalate. This paper examines some of the policy concerns surrounding recent developments in genetic screening. It discusses the impetus and implications of genetic screening in general, examines various applications, and analyzes the costs and benefits of screening programs currently in existence. Special emphasis is placed on whether or not screening should be considered a matter of public health (...)
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  10.  16
    The medical marketplace and the diffusion of technologies.Robert H. Blank - 1996 - Health Care Analysis 4 (4):321-324.
    This brief review of the efficacy, safety, and costs of IVF demonstrates that this procedure has become accepted medical practice without adequate scientific assessment. Its rapid proliferation especially in the market-oriented USA system, has preceded the type of outcomes research that is essential in order to protect both individual patients and the health care system. In addition, concern over the psychological costs borne by the vast majority of women who unsuccessfully pursue pregnancy through these techniques should warrant a level of (...)
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  11. The wrongful life dilemma: an update.Robert H. Blank - forthcoming - Bioethics Reporter.
     
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  12.  52
    Policy Implications of the New Neuroscience.Robert H. Blank - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (2):169-180.
    The 1990s “Decade of the Brain” stimulated research on many fronts and resulted in considerable advancement in neuroscience. Unfortunately, we have been slow to develop a policy dialogue to anticipate and deal with vast implications. Simply put, our political and social institutions have not kept pace with these advances. At the base, policy issues center on how we interpret the implications of these developments, especially given the complexity of the subject and the speculative nature of much of the evidence to (...)
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  13.  28
    Reproductive Ethics. [REVIEW]C. Keith Boone, R. Snowden, G. D. Mitchell, E. M. Snowden, Robert H. Blank & Michael D. Bayles - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (4):46.
    Book reviewed in this article: Artificial Reproduction: A Social Investigation. By R. Snowden, G.D. Mitchell, and E. M. Snowden. Redefining Human Life: Reproductive Technologies and Social Policy. By Robert H. Blank. Reproductive Ethics. By Michael D. Bayles.
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  14.  37
    Bioethical decisions: The political context and challenges.Robert H. Blank - 1981 - Journal of Medical Humanities 3 (3):163-179.
    Rapid advances in biomedicine, accompanied by changing social values, are thrusting bioethical decision making into the political spectrum. This article examines the forces which are politicizing bioethical decisions and demonstrates the challenges they raise. It also presents an overview of the current political context and concludes that American political institutions and processes are not well-suited for dealing with these intense, sensitive bioethical issues. Although the article reflects skepticism concerning the ability of the political system to fulfill the expansive demands confronting (...)
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  15.  39
    Review of Jean-Pierre Changeux and Paul Ricoeur. 2000. What Makes Us Think? A Neuroscientist and Philosopher Argue about Ethics, Human Nature, and the Brain. [REVIEW]Robert H. Blank - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):69-70.
  16.  21
    Review of Jean-Pierre Changeux and Paul Ricoeur. 2000. What Makes Us Think? A Neuroscientist and Philosopher Argue about Ethics, Human Nature, and the Brain. [REVIEW]Robert H. Blank - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):69-70.