Results for 'Robert J. Jeske'

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  1. Theory, Method, and Practice in Modern Archaeology.Robert J. Jeske & Douglas K. Charles (eds.) - 2003 - Praeger.
     
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  2.  23
    The Argument From Evil: ROBERT J. RICHMAN.Robert J. Richman - 1969 - Religious Studies 4 (2):203-211.
    The traditional problem of evil is set forth, by no means for the first time, in Part X of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion in these familiar words: ‘Is [God] willing to prevent evil, but not able? then he is impotent. Is he able, but not willing? then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? whence then is evil?’ This formulation of the problem of evil obviously suggests an argument to the effect that the existence of evil in (...)
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  3. Entitlement Theories of Justice: From Nozick to Roemer and Beyond: Robert J. Van der Veen & Philippe Van Parijs.Robert J. van der Veen - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):69-81.
    In Anarchy, State, and Utopia, Robert Nozick contrasts entitlement theories of justice and “traditional” theories such as Rawls', utilitarianism or egalitarianism, and advocates the former against the latter. What exactly is an entitlement theory of justice? Nozick's book offers two distinct characterizations. On the one hand, he explicitly describes “the general outlines of the entitlement theory” as maintaining “that the holdings of a person are just if he is entitled to them by the principles of justice in acquisition and (...)
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  4. The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe.Robert J. Richards - 2002
     
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  5.  24
    Sketch of a Componential Subtheory of Human Intelligence.Robert J. Sternberg - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):573-584.
  6. Beyond IQ: A Triarchic Theory of Human Intelligence.Robert J. Sternberg - 1986 - British Journal of Educational Studies 34 (2):205-207.
  7.  80
    Toward a Triarchic Theory of Human Intelligence.Robert J. Sternberg - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):269.
  8.  25
    Full‐On Stating.Robert J. Stainton - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (4):395-413.
    What distinguishes full-on stating a proposition from merely communicating it? For instance, what distinguishes claiming/asserting/saying that one has never smoked crack cocaine from merely implying/conveying/hinting this? The enormous literature on ‘assertion’ provides many approaches to distinguishing stating from, say, asking and commanding: only the former aims at truth; only the former expresses one's belief; etc. But this leaves my question unanswered, since in merely communicating a proposition one also aims at truth, expresses a belief, etc. My aim is not to (...)
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  9.  41
    Women on Corporate Boards of Directors and Their Influence on Corporate Philanthropy.Robert J. Williams - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (1):1 - 10.
    This study examined the relationship between the proportion of women serving on firms' boards of directors and the extent to which these same firms engaged in charitable giving activities. Using a sample of 185 Fortune 500 firms for the 1991-1994 time period, the results provide strong support for the notion that firms having a higher proportion of women serving on their boards do engage in charitable giving to a greater extent than firms having a lower proportion of women serving on (...)
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  10.  24
    The Things We Mean.Robert J. Stainton - 2003 - Philosophical Review 115 (1):124-127.
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  11.  25
    Visual Imagery for Words: The Hebb Test.Robert J. Weber & Roger Harnish - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (3):409-414.
  12.  77
    Corporate Philanthropy, Criminal Activity, and Firm Reputation: Is There a Link? [REVIEW]Robert J. Williams & J. Douglas Barrett - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 26 (4):341 - 350.
    This study examined the influence of corporate giving programs on the link between certain categories of corporate crime and corporate reputation. Specifically, firms that violate EPA and OSHA regulations should, to some extent, experience a decline in their reputations, while firms that contribute to charitable causes should see their reputations enhanced. The results of this study support both of these contentions. Further, the results suggest that corporate giving significantly moderates the link between the number of EPA and OSHA violations committed (...)
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  13. Self-Knowledge and Self-Reference.Robert J. Howell - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (1):44-70.
    Self-Knowledge and Self-Reference is a defense and reconciliation of the two apparently conflicting theses that the self is peculiarly elusive and that our basic, cogito-judgments are certain. On the one hand, Descartes seems to be correct that nothing is more certain than basic statements of self-knowledge, such as "I am thinking." On the other hand, there is the compelling Humean observation that when we introspect, nothing is found except for various "impressions." The problem, then, is that the Humean and Cartesian (...)
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  14.  17
    Robert J. Fogelin 233.Robert J. Fogelin - 1976 - In J. P. Cleave & Stephan Körner (eds.), Philosophy of Logic: Papers and Discussions. University of California Press. pp. 233.
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  15.  8
    Representation and Process in Linear Syllogistic Reasoning.Robert J. Sternberg - 1980 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 109 (2):119-159.
  16.  88
    Kant and Blumenbach on the Bildungstrieb: A Historical Misunderstanding.Robert J. Richards - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (1):11-32.
  17. The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe.Robert J. Richards - 2002 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):618-619.
     
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  18. The Cambridge Handbook of Wisdom.Robert J. Sternberg & Judith Glück (eds.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a comprehensive review of the psychological literature on wisdom by leading experts in the field. It covers the philosophical and sociocultural foundations of wisdom, and showcases the measurement and teaching of wisdom. The connection of wisdom to intelligence and personality is explained alongside its relationship with morality and ethics. It also explores the neurobiology of wisdom, its significance in medical decision-making, and wise leadership. How to develop wisdom is discussed and practical information is given about how to instil (...)
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  19.  18
    Component Processes in Analogical Reasoning.Robert J. Sternberg - 1977 - Psychological Review 84 (4):353-378.
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  20. Physics, Philosophy, and Theology: A Common Quest for Understanding.Robert J. Russell, William R. Stoeger & George V. Coyne (eds.) - 1988 - University of Notre Dame Press [Distributor].
  21.  11
    Is Visual Image Sequencing Under Verbal Control?Robert J. Weber, Joe Kelley & Susan Little - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):354-362.
  22.  19
    Analysis of Sequential Effects on Choice Reaction Times.Robert J. Remington - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (2):250.
  23.  76
    Justification Through Biological Faith: A Rejoinder. [REVIEW]Robert J. Richards - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (3):337-354.
    Though I have not found enough of the latter to test out this bromide, I am sensible of the value bestowed by colleagues who have taken such exacting care in analyzing my arguments. While their incisive observation and hard objections threaten to leave an extinct theory, I hope the reader will rather judge it one strengthened by adversity. Let me initially expose the heart of my argument so as to make obvious the shocks it must endure. I ask the reader (...)
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  24.  16
    Unities in Inductive Reasoning.Robert J. Sternberg & Michael K. Gardner - 1983 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 112 (1):80-116.
  25.  51
    Meaning and Reference: Some Chomskian Themes.Robert J. Stainton - 2006 - In Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press. pp. 913--940.
    This article introduces three arguments that share a single conclusion: that a comprehensive science of language cannot describe relations of semantic reference, i.e. word–world relations. Spelling this out, if there is to be a genuine science of linguistic meaning, then a theory of meaning cannot involve assigning external, real-world, objects to names, nor sets of external objects to predicates, nor truth values to sentences. Most of the article tries to explain and defend this broad conclusion. The article also presents, in (...)
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  26.  42
    The Innate and the Learned: The Evolution of Konrad Lorenz's Theory of Instinct.Robert J. Richards - 1974 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 4 (2):111-133.
  27. Schopenhauer.Robert J. Wicks - 2008 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This innovative volume presents an insightful philosophical portrait of the life and work of Arthur Schopenhauer. Focuses on the concept of the sublime as it clarifies Schopenhauer’s aesthetic theory, moral theory and asceticism Explores the substantial relationships between Schopenhauer’s philosophy and Buddhism, Hinduism, and Christianity Defends Schopenhauer’s position that absolute truth can be known and described as a blindly striving, all-permeating, universal “Will” Examines the influence of Asian philosophy on Schopenhauer Describes the relationships between Schopenhauer’s thought and that of Hegel, (...)
     
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  28. Indirectly Free Actions, Libertarianism, and Resultant Moral Luck.Robert J. Hartman - 2020 - Erkenntnis 85 (6):1417-1436.
    Martin Luther affirms his theological position by saying “Here I stand. I can do no other.” Supposing that Luther’s claim is true, he lacks alternative possibilities at the moment of choice. Even so, many libertarians have the intuition that he is morally responsible for his action. One way to make sense of this intuition is to assert that Luther’s action is indirectly free, because his action inherits its freedom and moral responsibility from earlier actions when he had alternative possibilities and (...)
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  29.  18
    A Triangular Theory of Love.Robert J. Sternberg - 1986 - Psychological Review 93 (2):119-135.
  30.  67
    Ethics and Regulation of Clinical Research.Robert J. Levine - 1986 - Urban & Schwarzenberg.
    In this book, Dr. Robert J. Levine reviews federal regulations, ethical analysis, and case studies in an attempt to answer these questions.
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  31.  73
    New Proofs for the Existence of God: Contributions of Contemporary Physics and Philosophy.Robert J. Spitzer - 2010 - William B. Eerdmans.
    New Proofs for the Existence of God responds to these glaring omissions. / From universal space-time asymmetry to cosmic coincidences to the intelligibility of ...
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  32.  33
    A Deranged Argument Against Public Languages.Robert J. Stainton - 2016 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 59 (1):6-32.
    Are there really such things as public languages? Are things like English and Urdu mere myths? I urge that, despite an intriguing line of thought which may be extracted from Davidson’s ‘A Nice Derangement of Epitaphs’, philosophers are right to countenance such things in their final ontology. The argument rebutted, which I concede may not have been one which Davidson himself ultimately embraced, is that knowledge of a public language is neither necessary nor sufficient for successful conversational interaction, so that (...)
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  33.  57
    In Defense of Non-Sentential Assertions.Robert J. Stainton - 2005 - In Zoltan Gendler Szabo (ed.), Semantics Versus Pragmatics. Oxford University Press. pp. 383--458.
    In what follows, I introduce a pragmatics-oriented approach to non-sentential speech, and defend it against two recent attacks. Among other things, I will rehearse and elaborate a defense against the idea that much, or even all, of such speech is actually syntactically elliptical—and hence should be treated semantically, rather than pragmatically. The chapter is structured as follows. In Section 1 I introduce the phenomenon, contrast semantic versus pragmatic approaches to it, and explain some of what hinges on which approach is (...)
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  34.  51
    Perceiving, Sensing, and Knowing.Robert J. Swartz (ed.) - 1965 - University of California Press.
    I. PERCEPTION AND THE OBJECTS OF PERCEPTION SOME JUDGMENTS OF PERCEPTION G. E. Moore I want to raise some childishly simple questions as to what we ...
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  35.  46
    Non-Sentential Assertions and Semantic Ellipsis.Robert J. Stainton - 1995 - Linguistics and Philosophy 18 (3):281 - 296.
    The restricted semantic ellipsis hypothesis, we have argued, is committed to an enormous number of multiply ambiguous expressions, the introduction of which gains us no extra explanatory power. We should, therefore, reject it. We should also spurn the original version since: (a) it entails the restricted version and (b) it incorrectly declares that, whenever a speaker makes an assertion by uttering an unembedded word or phrase, the expression uttered has illocutionary force.Once rejected, the semantic ellipsis hypothesis cannot account for the (...)
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  36. Paradoxes of Emotion and Fiction.Robert J. Yanal - 1999 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    How can we experience real emotions when viewing a movie or reading a novel or watching a play when we know the characters whose actions have this effect on us do not exist? This is a conundrum that has puzzled philosophers for a long time, and in this book Robert Yanal both canvasses previously proposed solutions to it and offers one of his own. First formulated by Samuel Johnson, the paradox received its most famous answer from Samuel Taylor Coleridge, (...)
     
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  37. Michael Ruse's Design for Living.Robert J. Richards - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (1):25 - 38.
    The eminent historian and philosopher of biology, Michael Ruse, has written several books that explore the relationship of evolutionary theory to its larger scientific and cultural setting. Among the questions he has investigated are: Is evolution progressive? What is its epistemological status? Most recently, in "Darwin and Design: Does Evolution have a Purpose?," Ruse has provided a history of the concept of teleology in biological thinking, especially in evolutionary theorizing. In his book, he moves quickly from Plato and Aristotle to (...)
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  38. Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science.Robert J. Stainton (ed.) - 2006 - Malden MA: Blackwell.
  39.  61
    Using Non-Sentences: An Application of Relevance Theory.Robert J. Stainton - 1994 - Pragmatics and Cognition 2 (2):269-284.
    Michael Dummett has nicely expressed a rather widespread doctrine about the primacy of sentences. He writes: "you cannot DO anything with a word — cannot effect any conventional act by uttering it — save by uttering some sentence containing that word ...". In this paper we argue that this doctrine is mistaken: it is not only sentences, but also ordinary words and phrases which can be used in isolation. The argument involves two steps. First: we show — using Sperber and (...)
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  40.  57
    Contextualism and Externalism: Trading in One Form of Skepticism for Another.Robert J. Fogelin - 2000 - Noûs 34 (s1):43 - 57.
  41.  31
    Quantifier Phrases, Meaningfulness “in Isolation”, and Ellipsis.Robert J. Stainton - 1998 - Linguistics and Philosophy 21 (3):311 - 340.
  42.  97
    Causality and the Ontology of Disease.Robert J. Rovetto & Riichiro Mizoguchi - 2015 - Applied Ontology 10 (2):79-105.
    The goal of this paper is two-fold: first, to emphasize causality in disease ontology and knowledge representation, presenting a general and cursory discussion of causality and causal chains; and second, to clarify and develop the River Flow Model of Diseases (RFM). The RFM is an ontological account of disease, representing the causal structure of pathology. It applies general knowledge of causality using the concept of causal chains. The river analogy of disease is explained, formal descriptions are offered, and the RFM (...)
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  43.  28
    I Like You, I Like You Not: Understanding the Formation of Context-Dependent Automatic Attitudes.Robert J. Rydell & Bertram Gawronski - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (6):1118-1152.
    (2009). I like you, I like you not: Understanding the formation of context-dependent automatic attitudes. Cognition & Emotion: Vol. 23, No. 6, pp. 1118-1152.
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  44.  22
    Thinking Styles.Robert J. Sternberg - 1991 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 7 (3):1-1.
  45.  52
    Dependent and Independent Reasons.Robert J. Yanal - 1991 - Informal Logic 13 (3).
    How are dependent (or linked) premises to be distinguished from independent (or convergent) premises? Deductive validity, sometimes proposed as a necessary condition for depende'nce, cannot be, for the premises of both inductive and deductive but invalid arguments can be dependent. The question is really this: When do multiple premises for a certain conclusion fonn one argument for that conclusion and when do they form multiple arguments? Answer: Premises are dependent when the evidence they offer for their conclusion is more than (...)
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  46.  58
    4 Darwin on Mind, Morals and Emotions.Robert J. Richards - 2003 - In J. Hodges & Gregory Radick (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Darwin. Cambridge University Press. pp. 92.
  47. The Paradox of Suspense.Robert J. Yanal - 1996 - British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (2):146-158.
    arratives, fictional and factual, commonly raise in their audience suspense. A narrative lays out over time a sequence of events; and because the events of the narrative are not completely told all at once, questions arise for the audience which will be answered only later in the narrative’s telling. Will the transfigured panther-woman pounce on her rival as she walks home alone at night, hearing strange noises around her? Will Sam and Annie ever make their date at the top of (...)
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  48. Darwin's Principles of Divergence and Natural Selection: Why Fodor Was Almost Right.Robert J. Richards - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):256-268.
    In a series of articles and in a recent book, What Darwin Got Wrong, Jerry Fodor has objected to Darwin’s principle of natural selection on the grounds that it assumes nature has intentions.1 Despite the near universal rejection of Fodor’s argument by biologists and philosophers of biology (myself included),2 I now believe he was almost right. I will show this through a historical examination of a principle that Darwin thought as important as natural selection, his principle of divergence. The principle (...)
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  49.  59
    Utterance Meaning and Syntactic Ellipsis.Robert J. Stainton - 1997 - Pragmatics and Cognition 5 (1):51-78.
    Speakers often use ordinary words and phrases, unembedded in any sentence, to perform speech acts—or so it appears. In some cases appearances are deceptive: The seemingly lexical/phrasal utterance may really be an utterance of a syntactically eplliptical sentence. I argue however that, at least sometimes, plain old words and phrases are used on their own. The use of both words/phrases and elliptical sentences leads to two consequences: 1. Context must contribute more to utterance meaning than is often supposed. Here's why: (...)
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  50. Hume and Others on the Paradox of Tragedy.Robert J. Yanal - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):75-76.
    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of J STOR’s Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. J STOR’s Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non—commercial use.
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