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  1.  32
    St. Augustine's Early Theory of Man, A.D. 386-391.Robert J. O'Connell - 2013 - Belknap Press.
  2.  26
    William James on the courage to believe.Robert J. O'Connell - 1984 - New York: Fordham University Press.
    William James’ celebrated lecture on “The Will to Believe” has kindled spirited controversy since the day it was delivered. In this lively reappraisal of that controversy, Father O’Connell contributes some fresh contentions: that James’ argument should be viewed against his indebtedness to Pascal and Renouvier; that it works primarily to validate our “over-beliefs” ; and most surprising perhaps, that James envisages our “passional nature” as intervening, not after, but before and throughout, our intellectual weighing of the evidence for belief.
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  3.  31
    Art and the Christian intelligence in St. Augustine.Robert J. O'Connell - 1978 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    St. Augustine was a consummate artist as well as a great philosopher, and he was deeply concerned with art, beauty and human values. But little attention has been paid to his theory of aesthetics. Now a distinguished Augustine scholar turns to this important subject and offers a book that is at once engaging, comprehensive and complete.
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  4. Art and the Christian Intelligence in St. Augustine.Robert J. O'connell - 1978 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (4):251-252.
     
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  5.  5
    An introduction to Plato's metaphysics.Robert J. O'Connell - 1985 - New York: Fordham University Press.
  6.  6
    Augustine's Philosophy of Mind, and: Original Sin in Augustine's "Confessions" (review).Robert J. O'Connell - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (1):125-127.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:BOOK REVIEWS 125 oped the theory of the swerve and applied it to the problem of voluntary action, also made use of it in his defense of moral responsibility" (l ~9-3o). The distinction Englert has in mind is between to hekousion and to eph' heroin, a distinction he had emphasized in his long chapter 5 on Aristotle, and insisted was important to Epicurus as well. But the promise is (...)
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  7.  3
    Imagination and Metaphysics in St. Augustine.Robert J. O'Connell - 1986
  8.  57
    Isaiah's Mothering God in St. Augustine's Confessions.Robert J. O'Connell - 1983 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 58 (2):188-206.
  9.  2
    Images of Conversion in St. Augustine's Confessions.Robert J. O'Connell - 1996 - Fordham Univ Press.
    Narrowing the focus of his Soundings in St. Augustine's Imagination (1994) O'Connell (philosophy, Fordham U.) analyzes three decisive conversions portrayed in the Confessions: the youthful reading of Cicero, that sparked by the platonist books, and the final capitulation in the Milanese garden. He also compares the conversion imagery with that in the Dialogues of Cassicciacum to shed light on the question of two Augustines. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.
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  10.  7
    Plato on the human paradox.Robert J. O'Connell - 1997 - New York: Fordham University Press. Edited by Robert J. O'Connell.
    A great thinker once said that "all philosophy is merely footnotes to Plato."Through Plato, Father O'Connell provides us here with an introduction to all philosophy. Designed for beginning students in philosophy, Plato on the Human Paradox examines and confronts human nature and the eternal questions concerning human nature through the dialogues of Plato, focusing on the Apology, Phaedo, Books III-VI of the Republic, Meno, Symposium, and O'Connell presents us here with an introduction to Plato through the philosopher's quest to define (...)
  11.  3
    Soundings in St. Augustine's Imagination.Robert J. O'Connell - 1993 - Fordham University Press.
    As a young student in Paris, O'Connell was first enamored of the intriguing artistic imagery of Augustine's works. The imagery continued to impress him as his scholarship continued. Now, after many years of research and regarding study on the topic, a thorough treatment of Augustine's "image clusters" is revealed in this volume, Soundings in St. Augustine's Imagination. That St. Augustine's writings are empowered by use of poetic imagery is of interest to readers of philosophy, theology, as well as language. In (...)
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  12.  21
    Teilhard at Fordham: 1963–1964.Robert J. O'Connell - 1965 - Dialogue 3 (4):382-384.
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  13.  46
    The God of Saint Augustine's Imagination.Robert J. O'Connell - 1982 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 57 (1):30-40.
  14.  2
    Teilhard's Vision of the Past: The Making of a Method.Robert J. O'Connell - 2020 - Fordham University Press.
    The Phenomenon of Man, by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, has been characterized as metaphysics, poetry, and mysticism-virtually everything except what its author claimed it was: a "purely scientific mémoir." Professor O'Connell here follows up on a nest of clues, uncovered first in an early unpublished essay, then in the series of essays contained principally in The Vision of the Past. Those clues all point to Teilhard's intimate familiarity with the philosophy of science propounded by the celebrated Pierre Duhem. It was (...)
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  15.  38
    The Will to Believe" and James's "Deontological Streak.Robert J. O'Connell - 1992 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 28 (4):809 - 831.
    James's ethical thought could frequently be consequentialist, but it could also on occasion show a deontological side, or "streak," as I contended in "William James on the Courage to Believe". This shows up when he speaks of the "strenuous" as against the "easy-going" moral mood, in "The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life," and it preserves the precursive intervention of our "passional natures" in "The Will to Believe" from lapsing into "wishful thinking." Toned down slightly, perhaps, in "Varieties of Religious (...)
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  16.  67
    When Saintly Fathers Feuded.Robert J. O'Connell - 1979 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 54 (4):344-364.